Cinematic Arts

Susan Dever, Chairperson
Department of Cinematic Arts
CERIA, Room 370
MSC04 2570
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
(505) 277-6262, FAX (505) 277-6314

Associate Professors

Susan Dever, Ph.D., Stanford University
Nina Fonoroff, M.F.A., San Francisco Art Institute
Deborah Fort, M.F.A., San Francisco Art Institute

Assistant Professors
Eva Hayward, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz
James Daniel Stone, Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Professor of Practice
Matthew McDuffie, M.A., University of New Mexico

Adjunct Professors
Katrin Schroeter, Ph.D., Brown University
Mary Tsiongas, M.F.A., California College of Arts

Lecturer
Bryan Konefsky, M.F.A., University of New Mexico

Professors Emeriti
Ed Angel, Ph.D., University of Southern California
Ira Jaffe, Ph.D., University of Southern California
Carl Mora, Ph.D., University of Alabama
Ernest Rose, Ph.D., Stanford University


Fees

Department fees support film and video rentals and purchases in history and criticism courses, plus the purchase, maintenance, and replacement of equipment used in the film and video production courses.

Introduction

The College of Fine Arts’ Department of Cinematic Arts is dedicated to the study and practice of film and video as art. In the hope of understanding and enhancing moving image productions, the curriculum offers students a broad foundation in sound and visual culture. Although one may approach film and video for commercial purposes, our Department emphasizes the value of the aesthetic achievements and cultural contexts of the works we make and critique.

Cinematic Arts students establish ties to the intellectual and creative pursuits of the College of Arts and Sciences as well as to parallel efforts in our own school. Transdisciplinary in nature, our offerings resonate with current practices in history, cultural studies, literary theory, visual and performing arts studies, anthropology, psychology, sociology, political theory, women and gender studies, and science studies. Through these lenses we encourage analysis and thoughtful representation of the way “race,” gender, class, sexuality, age, ability, and other elements of our identities intersect in cinema and video.

Given the global nature of moving images, we also offer students an outlook that is international as well as interdisciplinary. To learn about world cinema is to explore diverse cultures. The Media Arts curriculum includes courses devoted to various national and regional cinemas; students interested in Latino, Hispanic, Chicano, and Latin American cinemas, for instance, can focus their investigations on local cultures vis-à-vis global concerns. In these and in other courses, our department seeks to collaborate with a variety of academic departments such as Spanish and Portuguese or American Studies, where transcultural work is similarly promoted.

Students who major (or minor) in Media Arts are expected to maintain a grade point average in the major (or minor) of 3.0. More details about the major in Media Arts follow.


Courses

MA 110. Introduction to Mass Communication. (3)



MA 111. Technical Introduction to Video Production. (3)



MA 210. Introduction to Film Studies. (3)



MA 212. Beyond Hollywood. (3)



MA 216. Topics in Video Making. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA 310 / *410. Latin American Film. (3)



MA 324. Introduction to Screenwriting. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA 326 / *426. History of Film I: Silent. (3)



MA 327 / *427. History of Film II: Sound. (3)



MA 330. Studies in Film. (3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



MA 331 / *431. Film Theory. (3)



MA 332 / *432. Documentary Film History. (3)



MA 333 / *433. Film Noir. (3)



MA 334 / *434. Teen Rebels. (3)



MA 335 / *435. International Horror Film. (3)



MA 336 / *436. Images of (Wo)men. (3)



MA 337 / *437. Alfred Hitchcock. (3)



MA 339. Russian Culture and History through Film. (3)



MA 390. Topics in the Elements of Filmmaking. (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)



MA 391. 16mm Filmmaking. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA 394. Computer Generated Imagery and Animation. (3)



MA *409. Advanced Video Art. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA *410 / 310. Latin American Film. (3)



MA *412. “Third World” Cinemas: Cultures in Contact. (3)



MA *426 / 326. History of Film I: Silent. (3)



MA *427 / 327. History of Film II: Sound. (3)



MA *429. Topics in Production. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA *430. Topics in Film History. (3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



MA *431 / 331. Film Theory. (3)



MA *432 / 332. Documentary Film History. (3)



MA *433 / 333. Film Noir. (3)



MA *434 / 334. Teen Rebels. (3)



MA *435 / 335. International Horror Film. (3)



MA *436 / 336. Images of (Wo)men. (3)



MA *437. Alfred Hitchcock. (3)



MA *484. Evaluating the Arts. (3)



MA *485. Problems in Interdisciplinary Studies. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA *487. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA *494. Advanced Computer Generated Imaging and Animation. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA 496 / 596. Undergraduate Production Project. (1-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



MA 497 / 597. Undergraduate Independent Study. (2-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



MA 499. Honors Thesis. (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



MA 596 / 496. Graduate Production Project. (1-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



MA 597 / 497. Graduate Independent Study. (2-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809