Undergraduate Program

Faculty Advisor
Moises Gonzales

School of Architecture and Planning Undergraduate Advisor
Lois Kennedy


Degree Offered

Bachelor of Arts In Environment, Planning and Design


Introduction

The Bachelor of Arts in Environment, Planning and Design (B.A.E.P.D.) at the University of New Mexico is an undergraduate course of study related to the graduate degree in Community and Regional Planning (CRP). Environmental planning encompasses systematic and creative methods used to influence and respond to dynamic changes occurring in neighborhoods, cities, and entire regions throughout the world. Planners assist communities in formulating policies and plans to meet their social, economic, environmental, cultural, and physical needs.

In the American Southwest, human strategies for adapting to arid conditions have been evolving for thousands of years. They represent many different cultural perspectives, complex social histories, and rich practical learning that are vital for current and future survival. The Bachelor of Arts in Environment, Planning and Design offers students the opportunity to engage in socially and environmentally relevant skill building and to address the issues of an evolving social and cultural landscape.

Opportunities for Environmental Planners exist in a variety of governmental, non-profit, and private for-profit settings. Graduates have been hired in tribal, local, state, regional, and national planning and design offices. At the national level, graduates work for the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Resources Conservation Service, the Peace Corps, Los Alamos National Laboratories, the U.S. Department of Transportation, environmental advocacy organizations, and university facility planning departments. Our B.A.E.P.D. graduates may use this degree to advance to a graduate program or to work for state agencies, community-based organizations, community development foundations, or private planning firms concentrating in environmental analysis, geographic information systems, and community health planning.

Students in the B.A.E.P.D. Program take a total of 128 credits. The course of study consists of 37 credits from the University of New Mexico Core plus one extra 1-credit science lab, 36 credits of B.A.E.P.D. core courses, 40 credits of Community and Regional Planning Concentration courses, and 14 credits of electives.


Admissions

Application packets are due in the School of Architecture and Planning undergraduate advisor’s office by April 15 (for Fall admission) or November 15 (for Spring admission) of each year. To apply, a student must have completed a minimum of 26 hours of the UNM Core and/or B.A.E.P.D. Core, including ENGL 102 (with a C or better). The packet consists of an application form, which can be obtained from the School of Architecture and Planning undergraduate advisor, Room 117 in George Pearl Hall, or at the School of Architecture and Planning Web site. Students must also submit a two-page statement of intent indicating how this degree will benefit you, and an unofficial transcript. Transfer students must also include their transfer courses and exam credits from their LoboTrax degree audit in LoboWeb.  Students must have at least a 2.5 GPA. Students are required to either be taking or have taken either CRP 165 Introduction to Community and Regional Planning, or CRP 181 Introduction to Environmental Problems, at the time of their application.


Degree Requirements

Students must complete the UNM Core requirements (37 credit hours) in accordance with the catalog selection options.  Courses taken to fulfill UNM Core requirements may not also be used to fulfill B.A.E.P.D. Core requirements. UNM Core selections must include the following:

Physical and Natural Sciences
2 courses, both including labs 8
Social and Behavioral Sciences
CRP 181 Introduction to Environmental Problems 3
PSY 105 or SOC 101 General Psychology or Introduction to Sociology 3
ARCH 121 Introduction to Architecture 3
Total Credits for UNM Core, plus extra science lab 38
B.A.E.P.D. Core Requirements
CRP 165 Introduction to Community and Regional Planning 3
CRP 376 Human Settlements 3
CRP 482 Graphic Communication 3
ARCH 342 Human Factors and Programming 3
CJ 225 Small Group Communication 3
CRP 483 Introduction to GIS 3
Introduction to Research Methods (from any department) 3
21
Physical World (Select One)
SUST 134 Introduction to Environmental, Social and Economic Health 3
GEOG 195 Humans Role in Changing the Face of the Earth 3
GEOG 352 Global Climate Change 3
GEOG 365 Nature and Society 3
EPS 333 Environmental Geology (Prerequisites, check Catalog) 3
3
Philosophy and Ethics (Select One)
ANTH 340 Topics in Cultural Anthropology 3
CJ 268 Media Theories 3
PHIL 202 Descartes to Kant 3
PHIL 245 Professional Ethics 3
PHIL 363 Environmental Ethics 3
AMST 182 Introduction to Environment, Science and Technology 3
AMST 311 Material Culture in America 3
3
Art and Design (Select One)
ARCH 109 Design Fundamentals 3
ARTH 250 Modern Art 3
ARTS 187 Introduction to Photography 3
ARTS 320 The Phenomena of Color 3
ARTS 141 Introduction to Art and Ecology 3
3
Social and Political Dimensions (Select One)
CRP 435 Community Economics for Planners 3
CRP 470 Sem: Ecotourism and Community Development 3
CRP 487 Political Economy of Urban Development 3
POLS 280 Introduction to Political Analysis 3
POLS 270 Public Policy and Administration 3
3
Ethnic and Gender Studies (Select One)
CRP 428 Gender and Economic Development 3
CRP 473 Planning on Native American Lands 3
CRP 486 Planning Issues in Chicano Communities 3
AMST 333 Gender and Tradition 3
AMST 353 Race Relations in America 3
AMST 354 Social Class and Inequality 3
3
Total Credits for B.A.E.P.D. Core 36
Community and Regional Planning Concentration Requirements:
CRP 265 Community Planning Methods 3
CRP 330 Introduction to Urban Design 3
CRP 420 Environmental Design Studio 4
CRP 427 Watershed Management 3
CRP 433 Foundations of Physical Planning 3
CRP 437 Urban Systems 3
CRP 462
-or-
CRP 484
The Housing Process

Neighborhood Planning
3
CRP 467 Regional Planning Process and Theory 3
CRP 472 Indigenous Planning 3
CRP 474 Cultural Aspects of Community Development Planning 3
CRP 480 Community Growth and Land Use Planning 3
34
One Statistics course in any discipline 3
One of the following:
ECON 105 Introduction to Macroeconomics 3
ECON 106 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
3
Total Credits for CRP Concentration 40
Electives 14
Total Credits for B.A.E.P.D. Degree 128

 


Minor Study

Minor in Community and Regional Planning

Undergraduate students interested in a minor course of study in Community and Regional Planning (CRP) must apply to the program minor. Forms are available at the School of Architecture and Planning Web site, or from the SA+P undergraduate advisor, Room 117 in George Pearl Hall.

The Community and Regional Planning minor consists of 21 CRP credit hours as follows: 165, 181, 265, 376 or 480, 473 or 486, 481 or 482 or 483, and 3 hours of a 300- or 400-level CRP course.


Courses

CRP 165. Community and Regional Planning, Introduction. (3)



CRP 181. Introduction to Environmental Problems. (3)



CRP 203. Society and the Environment. (3)



CRP 265. Community Planning: Concepts and Methods. (3)



CRP 330. Introduction to Urban Design. (3)



CRP 376 / 576. Human Settlements. (3)



CRP 403 / 503. Community-Based Practice. (3)



CRP 416 / 516. The Natural History of Watersheds: A Field Approach. (3)



CRP 420. Environmental Design Studio. (4 [3])



CRP 421. Urban Design Studio. (3)



CRP 425 / 525. Urban Design Theory. (3)



CRP 427 / 527. Watershed Management. (3)



CRP 428 / 528. Gender and Economic Development. (3)



CRP 429 / 551. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



CRP 431 / 531. Foundations of Community Development. (3)



CRP 433 / 533. Foundations of Physical Planning. (3)



CRP 435 / 535. Community Economics for Planners. (3)



CRP 437 / 537. Urban Systems. (3)



CRP 462 / 562. The Housing Process. (3)



CRP 465 / 565. Land Development Economics. (3)



CRP *466. Public Sector Project Analysis. (3)



CRP 467 / 567. Regional Planning Process and Theory. (3)



CRP 470. Seminar. (1-3, no limit Δ)



CRP 472/572. Indigenous Planning. (3)



CRP 473 / 573. Planning on Native American Lands. (3)



CRP 474 / 574. Cultural Aspects of Community Development Planning. (3)



CRP 480 / 580. Community Growth and Land Use Planning. (3)



CRP 481 / 581. Computer Applications for Planning and Administration. (3)



CRP 482 / 582. Graphic Communications. (3)



CRP 483 / 583. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). (3)



CRP 484 / 584. Neighborhood Planning. (3)



CRP 485 / 585. Practice of Negotiation and Public Dispute Resolution. (3)



CRP 486 / 586. Planning Issues in Chicano Communities. (3)



CRP 487 / 587. Political Economy of Urban Development. (3)



CRP 500. Planning Theory and Process. (4)



CRP 503 / 403. Community-Based Practice. (3)



CRP 508. Design and Planning Assistance Center. (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



CRP 510. Planning Communication Workshop . (2)



CRP 511. Analytical Methods for Planning. (4)



CRP 513 / 413. Qualitative Research Methods. (3)



CRP 515. Natural Resources Field Methods. (3)



CRP 516 / 416. The Natural History of Watersheds: A Field Approach. (3)



CRP 520. Planning Studio . (4)



CRP 521. Advanced Planning Studio. (5)



CRP 525 / 425. Urban Design Theory. (3)



CRP 527 / 427. Watershed Management. (3)



CRP 528 / 428. Gender and Economic Development. (3)



CRP 530. Internship. (2)



CRP 531 / 431. Foundations of Community Development. (3)



CRP 532. Foundations of Natural Resources. (3)



CRP 533 / 433. Foundations of Physical Planning. (3)



CRP 535 / 435. Community Economics for Planners. (3)



CRP 536. Social Policy and Planning. (3)



CRP 537 / 437. Urban Systems. (3)



CRP 543. Transportation Planning. (3)



CRP 545. Land Use Controls. (3)



CRP 551 / 429. Problems. (1-3, no limit Δ)



CRP 562 / 462. The Housing Process. (3)



CRP 563. Housing Seminar. (3)



CRP 565 / 465. Land Development Economics. (3)



CRP 567 / 467. Regional Planning Process and Theory. (3)



CRP 568. Advanced Urban Design. (4)



CRP 569. Rural Community Development. (3)



CRP 570. Seminar. (1-3, no limit Δ)



CRP 572/472. Indigenous Planning. (3)



CRP 573 / 473. Planning on Native American Lands. (3)



CRP 574 / 474. Cultural Aspects of Community Development Planning. (3)



CRP 576 / 376. Human Settlements. (3)



CRP 577. Practice of Policy Development. (3)



CRP 578. Latin American Development Planning. (3)



CRP 579. Introduction to Preservation and Regionalism. (3)



CRP 580 / 480. Community Growth and Land Use Planning. (3)



CRP 581 / 481. Computer Applications for Planning and Administration. (3)



CRP 582 / 482. Graphic Communications. (3)



CRP 583 / 483. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). (3)



CRP 584 / 484. Neighborhood Planning. (3)



CRP 585 / 485. Practice of Negotiation and Public Dispute Resolution. (3)



CRP 586 / 486. Planning Issues in Chicano Communities. (3)



CRP 587 / 487. Political Economy of Urban Development. (3)



CRP 588. Professional Project/Thesis Preparation Seminar. (2 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



CRP 589. Professional Project II. (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



CRP 590. Historic Research Methods. (3)



CRP 591. Introduction to Preservation and Regionalism. (3)



CRP 592. Public Works. (3)



CRP 593. Civic Places. (3)



CRP 599. Master’s Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



CRP 691 . Sustainable Settlements. (3)



CRP 692. Urban Outcomes Analysis. (3)



CRP 693. Urban Goals and Components Analysis. (1-3)



CRP 694. Urban Design Methods. (1-3)



ARCH 695. Urban Design Methods. (1-3)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809