Physics and Astronomy

Wolfgang Rudolph, Chairperson
Physics and Astronomy Building, Room 100
MSC07 4220
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001
(505) 277-2616, FAX (505) 277-1520
http://panda.unm.edu

University Professor
Murray Gell-Mann, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Distinguished Professors
Carlton M. Caves, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
V. M. Kenkre, Ph.D., State University of New York (Stony Brook)

Regents Professor
Wolfgang Rudolph, Ph.D., University of Jena

Professors
Harjit S. Ahluwalia, Ph.D., University of Gujarat
Bernd Bassalleck, Ph.D., University of Karlsruhe
Kevin E. Cahill, Ph.D., Harvard University
Ivan H. Deutsch, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Jean-Claude Diels, Ph.D., University of Brussels
David H. Dunlap, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Michael S. Gold, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Patricia A. Henning, Ph.D., University of Maryland
Kevin Malloy, Ph.D., Stanford University
John A. J. Matthews, Ph.D., University of Toronto
John T. McGraw, Ph.D., University of Texas
Sudhakar Prasad, Ph.D., Harvard University
Richard J. Rand, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
Sally C. Seidel, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Mansoor Sheik-Bahae, Ph.D., State University of New York (Buffalo)

Associate Professors
Douglas Fields, Ph.D., University of Indiana
Dinesh Loomba, Ph.D., Boston University
Ylva Pihlström, Ph.D., Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
Mousumi Roy, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Gregory B. Taylor, Ph.D., University of California (Los Angeles)
James L. Thomas, Ph.D., Cornell University

Assistant Professors
Rouzbeh Allahverdi, Ph.D., University of Alberta
Huaiyu Duan, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Keith Lidke, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Akimasa Miyake, Ph.D., University of Tokyo 

Lecturers
Boye M. Odom, M.S., University of Texas (El Paso)
Mark Morgan-Tracy, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Jeff Saul, Ph.D., University of Maryland

Jointly Appointed Distinguished Professors
Steven R.J. Brueck, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Jointly Appointed Professors
Hua Guo, Ph.D., Sussex University, Sussex, UK
Philip H. Heintz, Ph.D., University of Washington
Ravinder Jain, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Marek Osinski, Ph.D., Polish Academy of Sciences
Stephan Posse, Ph.D., University of Cologne, Germany

Research Faculty
Susan R. Atlas, Ph.D., Harvard University
Stephen T.P. Boyd, Ph.D., University of California (Los Angeles)
Jayce Dowell, Ph.D., Indiana University (Bloomington)
Luke Emmert, Ph.D., Cornell University
Franco Giuliani, Ph.D., Politecnico di Torino, Italy
Igor Gorelov, Ph.D., Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow
Vasudevan Nampoothiri, Ph.D., Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay
Paul R. Schwoebel, Ph.D., Cornell University
Timothy L. Thomas, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Peter Zimmer, Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Professors Emeriti
Seymour S. Alpert, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Howard C. Bryant, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Colston Chandler, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Byron D. Dieterle, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Daniel Finley, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Stephen A. Gregory, Ph.D., University of Arizona
McAllister H. Hull, Jr., Ph.D., Yale University
David S. King, Ph.D., Indiana University
Christopher P. Leavitt, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
John K. McIver, Ph.D., University of Rochester
J. A. Panitz, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
R. Marcus Price, Ph.D., Australian National University
Derek B. Swinson, Ph.D., University of Alberta
David M. Wolfe, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Michael Zeilik II, Ph.D., Harvard University

National Laboratory Professors
Grant Biedermann, Ph.D., Stanford University
Robin Blume-Kohout, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Malcolm Boshier, D. Phil. (Physics), Oxford University
Kevin Fortier, Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta)
Andrew J. Landahl, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
Peter Schwindt, Ph.D., University of Colorado
Rolando Somma, Ph.D., Instituto Balseiro, Argentina

Affiliated Faculty
Mark R. Ackerman, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
John C. Brandt, Ph.D., University of Chicago
David A. Cardimona, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Stephan M. Carr, Ph.D., Dartmouth College
Stanley Cohen, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Helene R. Dickel, Ph.D., University of Michigan
John Dickel, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Robert V. Duncan, Ph.D., University of California (Santa Barbara)
Robert Eisenstein, Ph.D., Yale University
David Emin, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Evan Evans, Ph.D., University of California (San Diego)
Galen R. Gisler, Ph.D., Cambridge University
Terrance J. Goldman, Ph.D., Harvard University
Peter Goodwin, Ph.D., Cornell University
Michael Hasselbeck, Ph.D., University of Central Florida
Gary H. Herling, Ph.D., Yale University
Michael H. Holzscheiter, Ph.D., Johannes Gutenberg University, Germany
Dan Huang, Ph.D., Fudan University, China
Tony Hull, University of Pennsylvania
Namir Kassim, Ph.D., University of Maryland
Marcus Magnor, Ph.D., Erlagen University, Germany
Cristopher D. Moore, Ph.D., Cornell University
Andrei Pieryatinski, Ph.D., University of Toledo
Lee J. Rickard, Ph.D., University of Chicago
Keith Rielage, Ph.D, Washington University (St. Louis)
Donna Sieriej, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
George Skadron, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Gerard J. Stephenson, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Steven M. Valone, Ph.D., University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill)
Pace VanDevender, Ph.D., University of London, England
Stephan White, Ph.D., University of Sydney
Bernard Zak, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Gordon Zwartz, Ph.D., University of Toronto


Introduction

Students in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of New Mexico find themselves immersed in a stimulating atmosphere arising from their exposure to the teaching and research activities of 29 regular faculty members, another several dozen research, adjunct and part-time faculty members, a dozen postdoctoral research associates, and from their interactions with well over 100 undergraduate majors and over 120 graduate students. The atmosphere is enriched by activities of the Center for Quantum Information and Control, the Consortium of the Americas for Interdisciplinary Science, the New Mexico Center for Particle Physics, and the Institute for Astrophysics, which are housed in the department; by the Center for High Technology Materials, in which physicists and engineers are at work on understanding and developing optoelectronic materials and devices with novel properties; by the New Mexico Center for the Spatiotemporal Modeling of Cell Signaling, a collaborative effort that includes physicists, engineers, mathematicians, and biologists to study complex cell signaling networks, and by the collaborative projects the faculty and students in the department carry out with neighboring laboratories such as Sandia National Laboratories, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory; with local industries, and with institutes, universities and other centers of learning in the USA and elsewhere. Outstanding scientists from all over the world visit the department for periods of a few weeks to as long as a year, while seminars and colloquia feature international experts in their fields each week.

The research atmosphere is equally active, with work being pursued in astrophysics and astronomy, optics and photonics, condensed matter physics, quantum information, atomic and subatomic physics, biomedical physics, general relativity and statistical physics. The research is funded at a high level by various external agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, the National Institutes of Health, and NASA.

Application Procedures

Prospective candidates for both undergraduate and graduate degrees should contact the department’s academic advisor by mail, phone or e-mail at:

Department of Physics and Astronomy
Attn: Coordinator, Program Advisement
MSC07 4220
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
Phone: (505) 277-1514
E-mail: pandainfo@phys.unm.edu

Prospective candidates should also check the department’s website at http://panda.unm.edu.


Courses

ASTR 101. Introduction to Astronomy. (3)



ASTR 101L. Astronomy Laboratory. (1)



ASTR 109. Selected Topics in Astronomy. (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



ASTR 270. General Astronomy. (3)



ASTR 270L. General Astronomy Laboratory I. (1)



ASTR 271. General Astronomy. (3)



ASTR 271L. General Astronomy Laboratory I. (1)



ASTR *421. Concepts of Astrophysics I. (3)



ASTR *422. Concepts of Astrophysics II. (3)



ASTR *423. Radio Astronomy. (3)



ASTR *426. Optics and Instrumentation. (3)



ASTR *427. Topics in Planetary Astronomy. (3)



ASTR *455. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ASTR 456. Honors Problems. (1 to a maximum of 2 Δ)



ASTR 536. Advanced Astrophysics I. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ASTR 537. Advanced Astrophysics II. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ )



PHYC 102. Introduction to Physics. (3)



PHYC 102L. Physics Laboratory. (1)



PHYC 105. Physics and Society. (3)



PHYC 108. Introduction to Musical Acoustics. (3)



PHYC 108L. Musical Acoustics Laboratory. (1)



PHYC 110. Introduction to Applied Physics. (3)



PHYC 151. General Physics. (3)



PHYC 151L. General Physics Laboratory. (1)



PHYC 152. General Physics. (3)



PHYC 152L. General Physics Laboratory. (1)



PHYC 157. Problems in General Physics. (1)



PHYC 158. Problems in General Physics. (1)



PHYC 160. General Physics. (3)



PHYC 160L. General Physics Laboratory. (1)



PHYC 161. General Physics. (3)



PHYC 161L. General Physics Laboratory. (1)



PHYC 167. Problems in General Physics. (1)



PHYC 168. Problems in General Physics. (1)



PHYC 262. General Physics. (3)



PHYC 262L. General Physics Laboratory. (1)



PHYC 267. Problems in General Physics. (1)



PHYC 290. Computational Physics. (3)



PHYC **300. Topics in Physics & Astronomy. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PHYC **301. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (3)



PHYC **302. Introduction to Photonics. (3)



PHYC **302L. Optics Lab. (3)



PHYC **303. Analytical Mechanics I. (3)



PHYC **304. Analytical Mechanics II. (3)



PHYC **307L. Junior Laboratory. (3)



PHYC **308L. Junior Laboratory. (3)



PHYC 311. Problems in Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (1)



PHYC 313. Problems in Analytical Mechanics I. (1)



PHYC 314. AProblems in Analytical Mechanics II. (1)



PHYC **327. Geophysics. (3)



PHYC **330. Introduction to Modern Physics. (3)



PHYC 331. Problems in Introduction to Modern Physics. (1)



PHYC *400. Seminar. (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



PHYC *405. Electricity and Magnetism I. (3)



PHYC *406. Electricity and Magnetism II. (3)



PHYC *410. Chemistry and Physics at the Nanoscale. (3)



PHYC 415. Problems in Electricity and Magnetism I. (1)



PHYC 416. Problems in Electricity and Magnetism II. (1)



PHYC *430. Introduction to Solid State Physics. (3)



PHYC *450. Introduction to Subatomic Physics. (3)



PHYC 451 / 551. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PHYC *452. Research Methods. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PHYC 456. Honors Problems. (1 to a maximum of 2 Δ)



PHYC *463. Advanced Optics I. (3)



PHYC *464. Laser Physics I. (3)



PHYC *466. Methods of Theoretical Physics I. (3)



PHYC *467. Methods of Theoretical Physics II. (3)



PHYC 468. Problems in Methods of Theoretical Physics I. (1)



PHYC 469. Problems in Methods of Theoretical Physics II. (1)



PHYC *476L. Experimental Techniques of Optics. (3)



PHYC *477L. Experimental Techniques of Optics. (3)



PHYC 480. Special Topics in Physics and Astronomy. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PHYC *491. Intermediate Quantum Mechanics I. (3)



PHYC *492. Intermediate Quantum Mechanics II. (3)



PHYC *493L. Contemporary Physics Laboratory. (3)



PHYC *495. Theory of Special Relativity. (3)



PHYC 496. Problems in Intermediate Quantum Mechanics I. (1)



PHYC 497. Problems in Intermediate Quantum Mechanics II. (1)



PHYC 500. Advanced Seminar. (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



PHYC 501. Advanced Seminar. (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



PHYC 503. Classical Mechanics I. (3)



PHYC 505. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics. (3)



PHYC 511. Electrodynamics. (3)



PHYC 521. Graduate Quantum Mechanics I. (3)



PHYC 522. Graduate Quantum Mechanics II. (3)



PHYC 523. Quantum Field Theory I. (3)



PHYC 524. Quantum Field Theory II. (3)



PHYC 529. Condensed Matter I. (3)



PHYC 531. Atomic and Molecular Structure. (3)



PHYC 534. Plasma Physics I. (3)



PHYC 535. Plasma Physics II. (3)



PHYC 536. Advanced Astrophysics I. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PHYC 542. Particle Physics I. (3)



PHYC 545. Introduction to Cosmic Radiation. (3)



PHYC 551 / 451. Problems. (1-4 to a maximum of 16 Δ)



PHYC 552. Problems. (1-4 to a maximum of 16 Δ)



PHYC 554. Advanced Optics II. (3)



PHYC 559. Internship in Optical Science and Engineering. (3)



PHYC 566. Quantum Optics. (3)



PHYC 568. Nonlinear Optics. (3)



PHYC 569. Advanced Topics in Modern Optics. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PHYC 570. Theory of Relativity. (3)



PHYC 571. Quantum Computation. (3)



PHYC 572. Quantum Information Theory. (3)



PHYC 580. Advanced Plasma Physics. (3)



PHYC 581. Advanced Topics in Physics and Astrophysics. (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



PHYC 599. Master’s Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



PHYC 650. Research. (1-12 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



PHYC 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809