Earth and Planetary Sciences

Adrian J. Brearley, Chairperson
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Northrop Hall 141
MSC03 2040
221 Yale Blvd. NE
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
(505) 277-4204
http://epswww.unm.edu

Professors
Carl B. Agee, Ph.D., Columbia University
Yemane Asmerom, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Adrian J. Brearley, Ph.D., University of Manchester (Great Britain)
Laura J. Crossey, Ph.D., University of Wyoming
Maya Elrick, Ph.D., Virginia Tech
Tobias Fischer, Ph.D., Arizona State University
David Gutzler, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Karl E. Karlstrom, Ph.D., University of Wyoming
Leslie D. McFadden, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Grant Meyer, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Louis A. Scuderi, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
Zachary D. Sharp, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Gary A. Smith, Ph.D., Oregon State University

Associate Professors
Peter J. Fawcett, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Joseph Galewsky, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz
Rhian H. Jones, Ph.D., University of Manchester (Great Britain)
Gary Weissmann, Ph.D., University of California, Davis

Assistant Professors
Brandon S Schmandt, Ph.D., University of Oregon
Lindsay Lowe-Worthngton, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Lecturers
Aurora Pun, Ph.D, University of New Mexico
Melvin Strong, Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Senior Research Professors
Roger Y. Anderson, Ph.D., Stanford University
Wolfgang E. Elston, Ph.D., Columbia University
Cornelis Klein, Ph.D., Harvard University
Lee A. Woodward, Ph.D., University of Washington

Research Professors
Horton Newsom, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Charles K. Shearer, Jr., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts
James J. Papike, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Frans Rietmeijer, Ph.D., Rijksuniversiteit-Utrecht (Netherlands)
Jane Selverstone, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Senior Research Scientists III
Viorel Atudorei, Ph.D., University of Lausanne (Switzerland)
Ying Bing Jiang, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Francis McCubbin, Ph.D., Stony Brook University

Senior Research Scientists I
Abdul Mehdi S. Ali, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Victor Polyak, Ph.D., Texas Tech University

Research Scientist II
James Connolly, M.S., University of New Mexico

Research Scientist III
Michael N. Spilde, M.S., South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

Adjunct Faculty
Bruce Allen, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Sidney Ash, Ph.D., University of Reading (England)
W. Scott Baldridge, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
John D. Bloch, Ph.D., University of Calgary
Mark Boslough, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
David Coblentz, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Lawrence Crumpler, Ph.D., University of Arizona, Tucson
Lind S. Gee, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Fraser E. Goff, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz
Adrian Hartley, Ph.D., Aston University, United Kingdom
Charles Hutt,  Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Eric (Rick) Klingel, University of Akron
Joseph McAuliffe, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
Sean McKenna, Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines
Duane M. Moore, Ph.D., University of Illinois
Claudia Mora, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Walter C. Riese, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Charlotte Rowe, Ph.D., New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
John Shomaker, Ph.D., University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
Aviva Sussman, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Jolante Van Wijk, Ph.D., Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Thomas E. Williamson, Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Professors Emeriti
Michael E. Campana, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Rodney C. Ewing, Ph.D., Stanford University
John W. Geissman, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Stephen P. Huestis, Ph.D., University of California San Diego
Barry S. Kues, Ph.D., Indiana University


Introduction

Earth and Planetary Sciences is the study of the Earth and other bodies in the solar system. It involves the study of the formation, composition and history of rocks; the large- and small-scale processes that modify them after they form (including the effects of water, the atmosphere and human activities); and the useful materials (metals, petroleum, coal, etc.) that may be obtained from them. Earth and Planetary Sciences is a multidisciplinary science that utilizes chemistry, physics, biology, meteorology, oceanography and other disciplines to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of our planet and the solar system and to enhance the stewardship of our planet’s natural resources. Prospective majors are encouraged to begin their lower-division requirements in math, chemistry and physics as early as possible and visit with a Departmental Undergraduate Advisor to assist in curriculum planning. The B.S. degree is the recommended route for preparation for graduate study Geology, Geophysics or Planetary Science. B.S. students do not need to select a minor: completion of degree requirements fulfills requirements for a Distributed Minor. Petitions for course substitutions in the degree programs are welcome and should be made in consultation with a department advisor. All majors are encouraged to pursue an undergraduate thesis (493 and 495) in collaboration with a faculty advisor.

Students are advised to check with the department for information on new or changed requirements.


Associated Programs

Undergraduate Program


Graduate Program



Courses

ENVS 101. The Blue Planet. (3)



ENVS 102L. The Blue Planet Laboratory. (1)



ENVS 330. Environmental Systems. (3)



ENVS 430 / 530. Advanced Environmental Science. (4)



ENVS 530 / 430. Advanced Environmental Science. (4)



EPS 101. How the Earth Works - An Introduction to Geology. (3)



EPS 105L. Physical Geology Laboratory. (1)



EPS 110. Topics in the Earth Sciences. (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



EPS 115. Geological Disasters. (3)



EPS 201L. Earth History. (4)



EPS 203. Energy and the Environment. (3)



EPS 225. Oceanography. (3)



EPS 250. Geology of New Mexico. (3)



EPS 251. Meteorology. (3)



EPS 252. Volcanoes!. (3)



EPS **300. Topics in Geology. (1-4, may be repeated once Δ)



EPS **301. Mineralogy/Earth and Planetary Materials. (3)



EPS **302L. Mineralogy Laboratory. (2)



EPS **303L. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. (4)



EPS **304L. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. (4)



EPS **307L. Structural Geology. (4)



EPS 310L. New Mexico Field Geology. (4)



EPS **319L. Introductory Field Geology. (4)



EPS **333. Environmental Geology. (3)



EPS 352. Global Climate Change. (3)



EPS **365. Exploring the Solar System. (3)



EPS *400. Topics in Earth and Planetary Sciences. (1-4, may be repeated once Δ)



EPS 401 / 501. Colloquium. (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



EPS 405L / 505L. Stable Isotope Geochemistry. (3)



EPS 407L / 507L. Thermodynamics and Physical Foundations of Geochemistry. (4)



EPS 410 / 510. Fundamentals of Geochemistry. (3)



EPS *411L. Invertebrate Paleontology. (4)



EPS 415 / 515. Geochemistry of Natural Waters. (3)



EPS 420L / 520L. Topics in Advanced Field Geology [Advanced Field Geology]. (2-4 to a maximum of 8 Δ [4])



EPS 427 / 527. Geophysics. (3)



EPS 428 / 528. Applied Mathematics for Earth and Environmental Sciences. (3)



EPS 433. Statistics and Data Analysis in Earth Science. (3)



EPS 436 / 536. Climate Dynamics. (3)



EPS *439. Paleoclimatology. (3)



EPS 443 / 543. Aquifers and Reservoirs. (3)



EPS 445 / 545. Topics in Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. (1-4, may be repeated 5 times Δ)



EPS 450L / 550L. Volcanology. (4)



EPS 455L / 555L. Computational and GIS Applications in Geomorphology. (3)



EPS 457L / 557L. Mathematical Modeling in the Geosciences. (3)



EPS 462 / 562. Hydrogeology. (3)



EPS 465 / 565. Mars Evolution. (3)



EPS 476 / 576. Physical Hydrology. (3)



EPS 481L / 581L. Geomorphology and Surficial Geology. (4)



EPS 482L / 582L. Geoarchaeology. (3)



EPS 485L / 585L. Soil Stratigraphy and Morphology. (3)



EPS *490. Geologic Presentation. (1)



EPS 491-492. Problems. (1-3, 1-3)



EPS 493. Independent Study. (3)



EPS 495. Senior Thesis. (3)



EPS 501 / 401. Colloquium. (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



EPS 505L / 405L. Stable Isotope Geochemistry. (3)



EPS 507L / 407L. Thermodynamics and Physical Foundations of Geochemistry. (4)



EPS 510 / 410. Fundamentals of Geochemistry. (3)



EPS 513. Planetary Materials and the Evolution of the Solar System. (3)



EPS 515 / 415. Geochemistry of Natural Waters. (3)



EPS 516. Selected Topics in Geomorphology. (3, may be repeated 5 times Δ)



EPS 518L. Electron Microprobe Analysis. (3)



EPS 520L / 420L. Topics in Advanced Field Geology [Advanced Field Geology]. (2-4 to a maximum of 8 Δ [4])



EPS 522. Selected Topics in Geophysics. (3, may be repeated 5 times Δ)



EPS 523. Topics in Tectonics. (3, may be repeated 5 times Δ)



EPS 526L. Advanced Structural Geology. (4)



EPS 527 / 427. Geophysics. (3)



EPS 528 / 428. Applied Mathematics for Earth and Environmental Sciences. (3)



EPS 534. Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry. (3)



EPS 535. Freshwater Ecosystems. (3)



EPS 536 / 436. Climate Dynamics. (3)



EPS 538L. Analytical Electron Microscopy. (3)



EPS 543 / 443. Aquifers and Reservoirs. (3)



EPS 545 / 445. Topics in Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. (1-4, may be repeated 5 times Δ)



EPS 547-548. Seminar. (2-3, 2-3, may be repeated 5 times Δ)



EPS 550L / 450L. Volcanology. (4)



EPS 551-552. Problems. (1-3, 1-3)



EPS 555L / 455L. Computational and GIS Applications in Geomorphology. (3)



EPS 557L / 457L. Mathematical Modeling in the Geosciences. (3)



EPS 558. Geomicrobiology. (3)



EPS 562 / 462. Hydrogeology. (3)



EPS 565 / 465. Mars Evolution. (3)



EPS 576 / 476. Physical Hydrology. (3)



EPS 581L / 481L. Geomorphology and Surficial Geology. (4)



EPS 582L / 482L. Geoarchaeology. (3)



EPS 585L / 485L. Soil Stratigraphy and Morphology. (3)



EPS 587. Advanced Mineralogy. (3)



EPS 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



EPS 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



NTSC 261L. Physical Science. (4)



NTSC 262L. Life Science. (4)



NTSC 263L. Environmental Science. (4)



NTSC *400. Science Topics for Educators. (1-4, may be repeated twice Δ)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809