Linguistics

Caroline L. Smith, Chairperson
Humanities Bldg. 526
MSC03 2130, Linguistics
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-6353 FAX (505) 277-6355
e-mail: linguist@unm.edu
Web site: http://ling.unm.edu/

Professors
Melissa Axelrod, Ph.D., University of Colorado (Boulder)
William Croft, Ph.D., Stanford University
Jill P. Morford, Ph.D., University of Chicago
Phyllis Perrin Wilcox, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Sherman E. Wilcox, Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Associate Professors
Holly Jacobson, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Barbara J. Shaffer, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Caroline L. Smith, Ph.D., Yale University

Assistant Professors
J. Christian Koops, Ph.D., Rice University
Paul R. Platero, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Naomi Lapidus Shin, Ph.D., The Graduate Center at the City University of New York
Rosa Vallejos Yopán, Ph.D., University of Oregon

Lecturers
Erin Mares, B.S., University of New Mexico
Dawn Myers, M.S., University of New Mexico
Carole Gomez Uentillie, M.A., The University of Arizona

Professors Emeriti
Garland D. Bills, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
Joan L. Bybee, Ph.D., University of California (Los Angeles)
Eduardo Hernández Chávez, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)
Alan J. Hudson, Ph.D., Yeshiva University
Vera P. John-Steiner, Ph.D., University of Chicago

Adjunct Faculty
Paul Edmunds, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Ian Maddieson, Ph.D., University of California (Los Angeles)
David Margolin, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Daniel Sanford, Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Associated Faculty in Other Departments

LynnDianne Beene, Ph.D., University of Kansas (English)
Philip S. Dale, Ph.D., University of Michigan (Speech and Hearing Sciences)
Richard File-Muriel, Ph.D., Indiana University at Bloomington (Spanish and Portuguese)
Tania Ivanova-Sullivan, Ph.D., Ohio State University (Foreign Languages and Literatures)
George F. Luger, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (Computer Science)
Janet L. Patterson, Ph.D., University of New Mexico (Speech and Hearing Sciences)
Julie Sykes, Ph.D., University of Minnesota (Spanish and Portuguese)
Damián Vergara Wilson, Ph.D., University of New Mexico (Spanish and Portuguese)


Introduction

The Department of Linguistics offers a B.A. major and minor in Linguistics; a B.S. major in Signed Language Interpreting; a minor in Navajo Language and Linguistics; an M.A. and Ph.D. in Linguistics; and contributes to linguistics-related degree programs in other departments and colleges. The Department offers a range of courses in the core areas of phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, and discourse as well as in the interdisciplinary fields of applied linguistics, psycholinguistics, and sociolinguistics. The Department has a theoretical orientation based in functional and cognitive approaches and has teaching and research strengths in the areas of Signed Language Studies, typology, language evolution, sociocultural and interactional studies, Native American Languages, discourse analysis, and experimental inquiry. In addition the Department offers programs of study in linguistics with concentrations in Speech and Hearing Sciences, and Native American Languages of the Southwest. The faculty also participates in the Ph.D. program in Educational Linguistics, sponsored jointly by the Department of Linguistics and the College of Education’s Department of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies. The program in Educational Linguistics focuses on issues in bilingual and multicultural education and in second language learning and pedagogy.


Associated Programs

Undergraduate Program


Graduate Program



Courses

LING 101. Introduction to the Study of Language. (3)



LING 295. Special Topics in Current Language Issues. (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



LING 301. Introduction to Linguistic Analysis. (3)



LING 303. Introduction to Phonetics. (3)



LING 304 / 504. Phonological Analysis. (3)



LING 322 / 522. Grammatical Analysis. (3)



LING 331 / 531. Language in Society. (3)



LING 334 / 534. Language and Gender. (3)



LING 359 / 559. Language and Culture. (3)



LING 367 / 567. Psychology of Language. (3)



LING *401 - 402. Topics: American Indian Languages. (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ, 3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



LING 406 / 506. Introduction to Experimental Phonetics. (3)



LING 412 / 512. Morphosyntax. (3)



LING 413 / 513. Linguistic Field Methods. (3)



LING 415 / 515. Native American Languages. (3)



LING 417 / 517. Typology and Universals. (3)



LING 425 / 525. Semantic Analysis. (3)



LING 429 / 529. Discourse Analysis. (3)



LING 433. Sociolinguistic Variation. (3)



LING 436. Language and Education in Southwest Native American Communities. (3)



LING 440 / 540. Introduction to Linguistics. (3)



LING 441. English Grammars. (3)



LING 446 / 546. Introduction to Language Change. (3)



LING 447 / 547. Old English. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



LING 449. Middle English Language. (3)



LING 460 / 560. Child Language. (3)



LING 469L / 569L. Experimental Psycholinguistics. (3)



LING 490 / 590. Topics in Linguistics. (3, no limit Δ [3 to a maximum of 12 Δ])



LING 495. Undergraduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



LING 498. Reading and Research for Honors. (3)



LING 499. Honors Thesis. (3)



LING 502. Generative Theories of Phonology. (3)



LING 503. Usage-based Phonology. (3)



LING 504 / 304. Phonological Analysis. (3)



LING 506 / 406. Introduction to Experimental Phonetics. (3)



LING 512 / 412. Morphosyntax. (3)



LING 513 / 413. Linguistic Field Methods. (3)



LING 515 / 415. Native American Languages. (3)



LING 517 / 417. Typology and Universals. (3)



LING 519. Cognitive Linguistics. (3)



LING 522 / 322. Grammatical Analysis. (3)



LING 523. Functional Syntactic Theories. (3)



LING 525 / 425. Semantic Analysis. (3)



LING 529 / 429. Discourse Analysis. (3)



LING 531 / 331. Language in Society. (3)



LING 534 / 334. Language and Gender. (3)



LING 539. Seminar in Sociolinguistics. (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



LING 540 / 440. Introduction to Linguistics. (3)



LING 546 / 446. Introduction to Language Change. (3)



LING 547 / 447. Old English. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



LING 548. Grammaticization. (3)



LING 554. Seminar in Linguistic Theory. (3, no limit Δ [3 to a maximum of 12 Δ])



LING 559 / 359. Language and Culture. (3)



LING 560 / 460. Child Language. (3)



LING 565. Seminar in Thought and Language. (3)



LING 567 / 367. Psychology of Language. (3)



LING 568. Seminar in Psycholinguistics. (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



LING 569L / 469L. Experimental Psycholinguistics. (3)



LING 590 / 490. Topics in Linguistics. (1-3, no limit Δ [1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ])



LING 595. Graduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 24 Δ)



LING 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



LING 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



NVJO 101 - 102. Elementary Conversational Navajo for Non-Native Speakers. (3, 3)



NVJO 103. Basic Medical Navajo. (3)



NVJO 105. Introduction to Written Navajo for Native Speakers. (3)



NVJO 201. Intermediate Conversational Navajo I. (3)



NVJO 202. Intermediate Conversational Navajo II. (3)



NVJO 206. Creative Writing and Advanced Reading for Native Speakers. (3)



NVJO 311 / 511. Navajo Verb System I. (3)



NVJO 312. Navajo Verb System II. (3)



NVJO 315 / 515. Advanced Navajo. (3)



NVJO 401 / 501. Navajo Linguistics. (3)



NVJO 495. Undergraduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



NVJO 501 / 401. Navajo Linguistics. (3)



NVJO 511 / 311. Navajo Verb System I. (3)



NVJO 515 / 315. Advanced Navajo. (3)



NVJO 595. Graduate Problems. (1-6)



SIGN 201. Introduction to Signed Language. (3)



SIGN 210. American Sign Language I. (3)



SIGN 211. American Sign Language II. (3)



SIGN 212. Fingerspelling I. (3)



SIGN 214. Lexical Semantics for Transliteration. (3)



SIGN *305. Signed Language Linguistics. (3)



SIGN *310. American Sign Language III. (3)



SIGN 320. American Sign Language IV. (3)



SIGN *352. Language and Culture in the Deaf Community, Part 1. (3)



SIGN 355. Deaf History and Literature. (3)



SIGN *360. The Interpreting Profession. (3)



SIGN 411. Consecutive Interpretation. (3)



SIGN 412. Simultaneous Interpreting. (3)



SIGN 418. Signed Language Interpreting Research. (3)



SIGN 419. Practicum in Signed Language Interpreting. (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ)



SIGN 495. Undergraduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809