Spanish and Portuguese

Anthony J. Cárdenas-Rotunno, Chairperson
Department of Spanish and Portuguese
MSC03 2100
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
(505) 277-5907, FAX (505) 277-3885

Professor
Anthony J. Cárdenas-Rotunno, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin–Spanish

Associate Professors
Richard File-Muriel, Ph.D., Indiana University–Hispanic Linguistics
Jeremy Lehnen, Ph.D., University of New Mexico–Latin American Studies
Leila Lehnen, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University–Spanish and Portuguese
Kimberle López, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)–Spanish
Miguel López, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)–Spanish
Kathryn McKnight, Ph.D., Stanford University–Spanish
Anna Nogar, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin–Hispanic Literature
Mary B. Quinn, Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)–Hispanic Languages and Literature
Susan D. Rivera, Ph.D., University of New Mexico–Spanish
Eva Rodriguez González, Ph.D., University of Kansas–Psycholinguistics
Eleuterio Santiago-Díaz, Ph.D., Brown University–Hispanic Studies
Naomi Lapidus Shin, Ph.D., City University of New York Graduate Center–Linguistics
Rosa Vallejos, Ph.D., University of Oregon–Linguistics
Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara–Hispanic Languages and Literature
Damián Wilson, Ph.D., University of New Mexico–Hispanic Linguistics

Professors Emeriti
Garland D. Bills, Ph.D., University of Texas–Spanish
Pelayo Fernández, Ph.D., Salamanca University–Spanish
Rosa Fernández, Ph.D., University of New Mexico–Spanish
Dick Gerdes, Ph.D., University of Kansas–Spanish
Erlinda Gonzales-Berry, Ph.D., University of New Mexico–Spanish
María Dolores Gonzales, Ph.D., University of New Mexico–Spanish
Tamara Holzapfel, Ph.D., University of Iowa–Spanish
Enrique Lamadrid, Ph.D., University of Southern California–Spanish
Margo Milleret, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin–Portuguese
Tey Diana Rebolledo, Ph.D., University of Arizona–Spanish
Alfred Rodríguez, Ph.D., Brown University–Spanish
Jon M. Tolman, Ph.D., University of New Mexico–Portuguese


Introduction

The mission of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese is to promote quality teaching and research that integrate the languages, literatures, linguistics and cultures of the Spanish-and Portuguese-speaking worlds. We share our expertise with the university community, the city of Albuquerque and the state of New Mexico. We are especially committed to revitalizing the Spanish language in New Mexico and to studying the interactions between cultures in the Southwest.

Faculty and students work together in the classroom, in the community, and in study abroad to develop understanding, sensitive communication and critical thinking about our diverse and interconnected world. The Department prepares its students with the skills, knowledge, and values necessary to lead productive and fulfilling lives as citizens and life-long learners.


Group Requirements

Literature courses in translation are not accepted for fulfillment of foreign language group requirements.

Language Learning Center

Work in the Language Learning Center is assigned in connection with the lower-division language courses and does not carry extra credit.

Spanish Language Instruction Program

Language instruction courses develop grammar, vocabulary, the four language skills–listening, speaking, reading and writing–and culture.

Sabine Ulibarrί Spanish as a Heritage Language (SHL) Program

Spanish classes 111, 112, 211, and 212 are designated for students who have a cultural connection to the Spanish language. This is a comprehensive program that is designed to accommodate students at all phases of learning: from true beginners to those who are more fluent and are polishing their skills. By drawing upon our connection to the language, we make the study of Spanish more relevant to SHL learners; this serves as a significant motivating factor in language learning. A placement evaluation is required before entering these classes.

Spanish as a Second Language (SSL) Program

This program is designed for students of Spanish whose native home language is not Spanish. A placement evaluation is required before entering these classes.

Required Placement Evaluation

All UNM students who choose Spanish to fulfill their language requirement(s) must take a Spanish Placement Evaluation for placement at the appropriate level.

  • Students must print their placement results before logging out of the Web site.
  • If a student looses or misplaces their placement results, they have to re‐take the placement evaluation.
  • Students should bring a printout of their placement results to the first day of class.

Continuing students who are following the sequence of Spanish language courses are not required to take the placement evaluation again, unless, a period of one year or more has passed between Spanish courses.

Continuing students are required to bring an advisement transcript to the first day of class to verify enrollment in the appropriate course.

To Challenge a Course

When a student places into a higher‐level Spanish course, the student not only can advance faster, but also has the option to earn credit for the lower level courses by taking the Spanish language CLEP test. Students also have the option of challenging a course. If a student has earned a grade of B or better in a higher level course, he/she may, upon paying regular tuition for the lower level courses, receive credit for them.


Courses in Spanish (SPAN) are categorized in content areas. The category for each course appears in parenthesis at the end of the course description according to the following legend:

Language (L); Linguistics, Philosophy, and Methodology (LPM); Literature (LT); Peninsular Literature (PL); Spanish American Literature (SA); Southwest Hispanic Studies (SH).


Associated Programs

Undergraduate Program


Graduate Program



Courses

PORT 101. Elementary Portuguese I. (3)



PORT 102. Elementary Portuguese II. (3)



PORT 275. Introduction to Portuguese for Business [Intensive Beginning Portuguese]. (6)



PORT 276. Intensive Intermediate Portuguese. (6)



PORT 277. Intensive Portuguese for Spanish Speakers. (6)



PORT 301. Conversation and Pronunciation. (3)



PORT 311 / 511. Culture and Composition. (3)



PORT 312 / 512. Culture and Conversation. (3)



PORT 335. Brazilian Popular Culture. (3)



PORT 414 / 514. Topics in Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture. (3, no limit Δ)



PORT 416 / 516. Brazilian Cinema. (3)



PORT 417 / 517. Popular Brazilian Music. (3)



PORT 421 / 521. Brazilian Theater. (3)



PORT 457 / 557. Encounters with the New World I. (3)



PORT 458 / 558. Encounters with the New World II. (3)



PORT *461. Topics in Brazilian Literature. (3, no limit Δ)



PORT 497. Undergraduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PORT 498. Reading and Research for Honors. (3)



PORT 499. Honors Essay or Teaching. (3)



PORT 511 / 311. Culture and Composition. (3)



PORT 512 / 312. Culture and Conversation. (3)



PORT 514 / 414. Topics in Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture. (3, no limit Δ)



PORT 516 / 416. Brazilian Cinema. (3)



PORT 517 / 417. Popular Brazilian Music. (3)



PORT 521 / 421. Brazilian Theater. (3)



PORT 551. Graduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



PORT 557 / 457. Encounters with the New World I. (3)



PORT 558 / 458. Encounters with the New World II. (3)



PORT 570. Seminar in Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture. (3, no limit Δ)



PORT 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I. (3)



SPAN 102. Elementary Spanish II. (3)



SPAN 103 - 104. Elementary Spanish Conversation I – Elementary Spanish Conversation II. (1, 1)



SPAN 111. Elementary SHL I. (3)



SPAN 112. Elementary SHL II. (3)



SPAN 200. Intermediate Spanish Abroad. (3)



SPAN 201. Intermediate Spanish I. (3)



SPAN 202. Intermediate Spanish II. (3)



SPAN 203. Spanish Conversation. (3)



SPAN 205. Introduction to Medical Spanish. (3)



SPAN 211. Intermediate SHL I. (3)



SPAN 212. Intermediate SHL II. (3)



SPAN 301. Topics in Hispanic Culture and Language. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 302. Developing Spanish Writing Skills. (3)



SPAN 305. Medical Spanish and Public Health. (3)



SPAN 306. Health and Healing in Hispanic Literature. (3)



SPAN 307. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (3)



SPAN 329. Topics in Health and Culture in the Hispanic World. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



SPAN **350 [**350L]. Introduction to the Sound Patterns of Spanish. (3 [4])



SPAN 351. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics. (3)



SPAN **352. Advanced Grammar. (3)



SPAN 370. Survey of Chicano Literature. (3)



SPAN 371. Spanish of the Southwest. (3)



SPAN 375. Southwestern Hispanic Folklore. (3)



SPAN **411. Survey of Spanish Peninsular Literature I. (3)



SPAN **412. Survey of Spanish Peninsular Literature II. (3)



SPAN *423. Cervantes: The Quijote. (3)



SPAN **429. Topics in Spanish Peninsular Culture and Literature. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN **430. Spanish American Short Story. (3)



SPAN **431. Spanish American Literature Survey I. (3)



SPAN **432. Spanish American Literature Survey II. (3)



SPAN **433. Modern Spanish American Poetry. (3)



SPAN **435. Modern Spanish American Fiction. (3)



SPAN *438. Mexican Literature. (3)



SPAN **439. Topics in Spanish American Culture and Literature. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 445 / 545. The Sound Patterns of Spanish. (3)



SPAN 449. Topics in Hispanic Linguistics. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN **479. Topics in Southwest Folklore-Literature. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 497. Undergraduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



SPAN 498. Reading and Research for Honors. (3)



SPAN 499. Honors Essay. (3)



SPAN 502. Proseminar: Research and Critical Methodology. (3)



SPAN 504. Seminar in Ibero-American Studies. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 515. Spanish Medieval Paleography. (3)



SPAN 519. Medieval Literature. (3)



SPAN 520. Seminar in the Spanish Peninsular Picaresque Novel. (3)



SPAN 522. Seminar in Spanish Peninsular Poetry. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 526. Seminar in Twentieth-Century Spanish Peninsular Theater. (3)



SPAN 529. Spanish Peninsular Post-War Novel. (3)



SPAN 531. The Modernist Movement in Spanish American Poetry. (3)



SPAN 536. Colonial Literature. (3)



SPAN 541. Approaches to Language Teaching Methodology [Recent Research on the Teaching of Spanish]. (3)



SPAN 545 / 445. The Sound Patterns of Spanish. (3)



SPAN 546. Seminar in Hispanic Sociolinguistics. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 547. Seminar in Southwest Spanish. (3)



SPAN 549. Seminar in the Language of Spain or Spanish America. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 551. Graduate Problems. (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



SPAN 578. Topics in Southwest Hispanic Literature. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 579. Topics in Southwest Culture & Folklore. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



SPAN 601. Literary Theory. (3)



SPAN 629. Seminar in Spanish Peninsular Literature. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 639. Seminar in Spanish American Literature. (3, no limit Δ)



SPAN 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809