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Accounting (ACCT)


2110 [MGMT 202]. Principles of Accounting I [Principles of Financial Accounting] (3)

An introduction to financial accounting concepts emphasizing the analysis of business transactions in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), the effect of these transactions on the financial statements, financial analysis, and the interrelationships of the financial statements.

2120 [MGMT 303]. Principles of Accounting II [Managerial Accounting] (3)

An introduction to the use of accounting information in the management decision making processes of planning, implementing, and controlling business activities.  In addition, the course will discuss the accumulation and classification of costs as well as demonstrate the difference between costing systems. Prerequisite: 2110.




Aerospace Studies (AFAS)


120. The Foundation of the United States Air Force (1)

A survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provide an overview of the basic characteristics, missions and organization of the Air Force.

120L. Leadership Laboratory (1)

Development of personal leadership and managerial abilities. Examination and demonstration of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies and standards of discipline and conduct. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 120.

121. The Foundation of the United States Air Force (1)

A survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provide an overview of the basic characteristics, missions and organization of the Air Force.

121L. Leadership Laboratory (1)

Continuation of AFAS 120L. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 121.

250. The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power (1)

Introduces topics on Air Force heritage and leaders, introduction to air and space power through examination of competencies, functions and continued application of communication skills.

250L. Leadership Laboratory (1, may be repeated once Δ)

Application of elements of personal leadership. Demonstration of command, effective communications, individual leadership instruction, physical fitness training and knowledge of Air Force requirements. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 250.

251. The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power (1)

Introduces topics on Air Force heritage and leaders, introduction to air and space power through examination of competencies, functions, and continued application of communication skills.

251L. Leadership Laboratory (1, may be repeated once Δ)

Continuation of AFAS 250L. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 251.

300. Air Force Leadership Studies (3)

Teaches cadets advanced skills and knowledge in management and leadership. Emphasis placed on enhancing leadership skills. Cadets have an opportunity to try out these leadership/management techniques in a supervised environment as juniors and seniors.

300L. Leadership Laboratory (1)

Application of leadership and management theories and concerns through participation in advanced leadership experiences; weight and fitness training. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 300.

301. Air Force Leadership Studies (3)

Teaches cadets advanced skills and knowledge in management and leadership. Emphasis placed on enhancing leadership skills. Cadets have an opportunity to try out these leadership/management techniques in a supervised environment as juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: 300.

301L. Leadership Laboratory (1)

Continuation of AFAS 300L. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 301.

325. Air Force ROTC Directed Studies (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course provides the opportunity for individual directed studies of advanced subjects under supervision of designated AFROTC faculty. This course is only open to AFROTC Cadets. Restriction: permission of department.

329. Active Duty Physical Training Preparation (1, may be repeated eight times Δ)

Course prepares Field Training (FT) Preparation cadets for their roles as military leaders by teaching various ways to conduct military fitness training. Goal is to expose cadets to many training methods while instilling AF physical fitness standards. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of instructor.

350. Air Force ROTC Field Training (3)

Required summer field training program, which is an integral and mandatory part of the AFROTC commissioning process. This course completes the GMC program of study and is only open to AFROTC Cadets. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of department.

400. National Security Affairs-Preparation for Active Duty (3)

A foundation for seniors to understand their role as military officers in American society. An overview of the complex social and political issues facing the military profession. Prerequisite: 301.

400L. Leadership Laboratory (1)

Advanced laboratory experience in practicing leadership and managerial techniques with individuals and groups. Applying effective communications and human relations. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 400.

401. National Security Affairs-Preparation for Active Duty (3)

A foundation for seniors to understand their role as military officers in American society. An overview of the complex social and political issues facing the military profession. Prerequisite: 400.

401L. Leadership Laboratory (1)

Continuation of AFAS 400L. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 401.




Africana Studies (AFST)


101. Swahili I (3)

(Also offered as SWAH 101) Foundation course for all beginning students interested in reading or speaking the language. {Offered upon demand}

102. Swahili II (3)

(Also offered as SWAH 102) This course builds directly upon AFST 101, and is designed to bring the students beyond a novice-intermediate or intermediate level of competence. Prerequisite: 101.

1110 [104]. Introduction to Africana Studies (3)

An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to the histories, cultures, and experiences of global people of African descent.

1120 [109]. Race in the Digital Age [Introduction to Comparative Global and Ethnic Societies] (3)

The digital realm is comprised of storied sites such as commerce, employment, education, therapy, community, political expression, crime, and ideas. Technology has transformed the who, what, where, and why of how we define community and identity in the digital age. However, who you are and where you are still matters, despite the benefits of anonymity in cyberspace. This course will investigate the relevance of race, gender, class, identity, and the “cultural capital” that one can spend in our Digital Age economy. To this end, we will start with critical race scholar, Prof. Derrick Bell’s 1990 sci-fi influenced work which prophesied a 21st century “post-racial” American: entwining over two centuries of racial designations on an ever evolving economic marketplace. This course will approach our present “post-racial” moment as an exceptional period for developing new models for identity formation.

2110 [250]. African American History [Survey of African American History] (3)

Survey of African-American history from the African past to the present. Themes covered are the African background, holocaust of enslavement, emancipation and reconstruction, Jim Crow, civil rights, Black power, and the post-industrial/post civil rights eras.

2140 [255]. Black Women in the African Diaspora [Black Women and the Diaspora] (3)

This survey course reviews the contributions of Black women to the Black Diasporic story.

249. Race and the Black Male (3)

This course explores the historical construction of Black Manhood in America. Students in this class will critically analyze the construction of Black male identity in America within the contexts of education, religion and mass incarceration.

297. Interdisciplinary Topics (1-3)

Special topic courses in specialized areas of African-American Studies. Community Economic Development; Race and American Law; Culture and Personality.

299. Black Leadership (3)

A comparative study of major African-American leaders and their impact on race relations in the United States.

303. Black Liberation and Religion (3)

(Also offered as RELG 303) Students will be introduced to the Black experience, which necessitates the redefinition of God and Jesus Christ in the lives of Black people as the struggle for transcendental and political freedom.

307. African Diaspora in the Southwest [Blacks in the Southwest] (3)

(Also offered as AMST 351) A survey of the lives of Blacks in the American West (1528–1918).

309. Black Politics (3)

(Also offered as POLS 309) A study of the history and diverse educational and political maturation processes of elected American officials and functions of the political process. {Fall}

315. Race and the Law (3)

Explores the historical and contemporary treatment of race in the United States by the courts and the legislature, and the construction of race as a concept and position of identity through the law.

317. Civil Rights Movement (3)

This course surveys the Civil Rights Movement, focusing on legal decisions, events, and consequences of the era. Black radicalism, federal policies, world affairs, the role/impact of gender, and post-Civil Rights America will be explored.

322. Africana Study Abroad (1-6 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

This course surveys the Civil Rights Movement, focusing on legal decisions, events, and consequences of the era. Black radicalism, federal policies, world affairs, the role/impact of gender, and post-Civil Rights America will be explored.

329. Introduction to African Politics (3)

(Also offered as POLS 329) An introductory course in the volatile politics in Africa. The various ideologies that underlie political movements and influence African governments will be explored.

333. Black Political Theory (3)

Survey course of the literature and philosophy of the Black Diaspora.

335. Sociology of Black Communities (3)

This course examines issues and introduces relevant sociological theories and concepts related to Black social life in America and Afro-Latin communities from a historical and contemporary frame of reference.

340. Race and Globalization (3)

This course highlights the intersection and impact of race and globalization on people and communities worldwide and their resistance to the most oppressive consequences of economic, political, and cultural globalization.

345. Foundations in Critical Race Theory (3)

This course interrogates theories related to race, racism, racial power, racialization, white supremacy and anti-black ideology.

360. The Harlem Renaissance (3)

This course introduces the art, literature, and music of the Harlem Renaissance and the development of Black identity. The course will also review the historic roots of the Black Arts Movement and Hip Hop Culture.

380. African Literature (3)

An analytical look at the works of major African writers and their usage of African symbols to portray Africa of the past, present and the future.

381. African-American Literature II (3)

(Also offered as ENGL 366) This is the second phase of a three-part journey through the African-American experience in search of humanity and peace. The vehicle is post-slavery books written by and about African-American people. Issues raised and the characters in the books provide the occasion for in-depth discussion of inhumanity, protests, self definition, race relationships, liberalism, etc.

385. The African World (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Africa; its political and economic geographies; its traditional and new societies; and its politics in global perspectives.

388. Blacks in Latin America (3)

A comprehensive analysis of the plight of Black people in Latin America as compared with their experiences in North America, from the 15th to 19th century.

391. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



395. Education in Colonial Africa [Education and Colonial Africa] (3)

A study of European education and its psychological, sociological and cultural impact on traditional African society. {Fall, Spring}

396. Emancipation and Equality (3)

The course examines the ending of and aftermath of slavery focusing on Silversmith’s The First Emancipation and also the general emancipation of the Civil War era.

*397. Interdisciplinary Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

Special topic courses in specialized areas of African-American Studies. African-American Literature; Sociopolitics: Africa; Politics of Southern Africa; Black Books III, Education and African-American Education and Free Society. {Fall, Spring}

398. Africana Philosophy and Methods (3)

This course draws upon significant philosophical ideas and methodological practices, which outline an Africana worldview.

399. Race, Culture and Education (3)

Analysis of the different child-rearing practices and their effects on the academic performances of children. Analyzes the role of culture in education.

453. African American Art (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 453 / 553) This class provides an overview of African American artists and contextualizes their creativity within the wider framework of U.S. art. What, for example, are the benefits and pitfalls of assigning race to any creative practice?

*495. Topics in Africana Studies (1-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Explorations of a variety of advanced topics in Africana Studies.

497. Advanced Community Organizing (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course serves as one of the possible capstone experiences for Africana Studies majors. Students engage in research and/or community projects.

498. Research Seminar (3)

This course examines several types of research and mixed-methods as tools for understanding the role of theory, research, methods, and practice across disciplines related to Africana Studies.




Arts Leadership and Business (See also: ALBS) (ALB)


*365. Social Media for Arts Marketing (3)

Emphasis on developing a Web presence and using social media tools for arts marketing and promotion. Real world projects and case discussions will assist in understanding social media marketing practices and strategies.

*370. Problems in Arts Leadership and Business (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This problems course rotates areas of study that reflect contemporary trends and issues in Arts Management. Problems include, but are not limited to: creative economy, public arts commissioning, and arts entrepreneurship.

375. Producing for Film and Digital Media (3)

(Also offered as FDMA 375) Students will learn roles of the motion picture producer, acquiring the skills to produce a film or digital media project. Includes choosing a viable project and optioning, developing and preparing for pre-production, production, and post-production.

*410. Arts Entrepreneurship (3)

This course explores a variety of topics about Arts Entrepreneurship, including strategies for determining a path, the evolving definition of "making it", and our own thinking about the relationship between art and business.

*450. Business Planning for the Arts (3)

This course guides students to research and review current theories and trends in the creative economy and how this economic activity is shaping contemporary arts management strategies and practices nationally and globally. Prerequisite: ALBS 2110. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

*451. Non-Profit Arts Administration (3)

The course is designed to prepare students to be successful arts administrators as they apply management principles in an arts environment. Students will develop capacity building strategies and their own professional practice in the arts. Prerequisite: *365 or ALBS 250.

*470. Advanced Topics in Arts Leadership and Business (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Arts Management Practices rotates areas of study that considers current professional practices in allied fields. Practices include, but are not limited to: public arts commissioning, arts funding development, or creative placemaking.

*495. Arts Leadership and Business Internship (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Students are required to complete concurrent online training and 150 internship hours onsite under a mentor's supervision. Prerequisite: ALBS 2110. Restriction: permission of program.




Arts Leadership and Business (See also: ALB) (ALBS)


2110 [ALB 250]. The Business of Being an Artist (3)

Survey of arts management terms and concepts with an emphasis on the creative workforce and economy, business of art, nonprofit management, and arts career development strategies. Students develop a career plan that informs their academic directions.

2120 [ALB 275]. Making The Promotional Video (3)

Fundamentals of promotional video making and providing technical and aesthetic proficiencies used in video communications for public relations and marketing. Includes exposure to industry practices and the expertise of public relations and marketing professionals.




American Studies (AMST)


1110 [182]. Introduction to Environmental and Social Justice (3)

An introduction to the theories of the environment, theories of justice in the context of environmental policy and planning and to histories of poor peoples' struggles around the unequal distribution of toxic waste. (ESJ) {Summer, Fall, Spring}

1120 [183]. Introduction to Gender Studies (3)

This course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of the construction of gender as a category. Readings will span cross-cultural and historical materials, including literary, artistic and popular representations of masculinity and femininity in America. (GS)

1130 [184]. Introduction to American Popular Culture (3)

This course considers a range of theoretical approaches to the study of popular culture, includingcultural studies and feminist theory as well as key concepts and key debates in the study of popularculture. It explores the ways popular culture is implicated in the formation of social determinantssuch as ethnicity, race, gender, class, and sexuality and conversely, how these social determinants areimplicated in the formation of popular culture. The course also considers the ways in which popularculture serves as a site of ongoing political struggle. The aim of the course is to provide students witha critical vocabulary to make sense of broader significance and relevance of popular culture--whypopular culture matters. To accomplish this, we will investigate a number of popular expressiveforms including magazines, fandom, digital music, and hip hop.  (PC)

1140 [185]. Introduction to Race, Class and Ethnicity (3)

This course offers an introduction to the field of American Studies through an interdisciplinary examination of race, class and ethnicity in the United States and in a global context. Using a schedule of keywords, we will engage a range of central themes and concerns. We will examine histories of injustice, and resistance to injustice. Readings and assignments encourage students to notice the privilege and oppression at the core of U.S. society. The class will challenge the widely accepted assumption that we as a nation have moved beyond race and racism. Through readings, films, online sources, and our assignments, this course aims to increase our knowledge of inequality in our society, and the impact of those inequities on various societies and individuals. (RCE) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.  {Summer, Fall, Spring}

1150 [186]. Introduction to Southwest Studies (3)

This course introduces the complex histories, social issues, and cultural experiences of peoples of the southwestern United States. Course materials and discussions also demonstrate the possibilities of interdisciplinary study of regional American culture. It is multicultural in content and multidisciplinary in methodology. We will examine cross-cultural relationships among the peoples of the Southwest within the framework of their expressions and experiences in art, culture, religion; social and political economy. (SS) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.  {Summer, Fall, Spring}

2110 [285]. American Life and Thought [Perspectives in American Studies] (3)

This course introduces students to cultural studies and the alternative interpretations of American history and culture. Particular attention will be paid to indigenous history, country music, tattoos, and American mobilization for war. Course materials and lectures will frequently utilize cultural traditions to explore key concepts and issues. Additionally, this course will require students to assume an analytical and critical perspective on academic interpretive models. We will read texts that exemplify critical Marxist, feminist, and reflexive anthropological approaches. (G) {Fall, Spring}

252. The Native American Experience (3)

(Also offered as NATV 252) Introductory survey of Native American History, culture and contemporary issues. Students read literature by and about Native Americans covering a variety of topics including tribal sovereignty, federal policy, activism, economic development, education and community life. (RCE)

2996 [200]. Topics [Topics in American Studies] (3, no limit Δ)

(G)

303. Law in the Political Community (3)

(Also offered as POLS 303) Introduction to the role of law and legal institutions in politics and society. (C)

309 / 509. Topics in Social Movements (3, may be repeated once Δ)

An interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of social movements, focusing on cultural and social formations of these movements. Topics include: folklore of social movements; labor struggles; peace movements; land conflicts. (C)

310 / 510. Topics in Cultural Studies (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Varying topics undergraduate course. An in-depth study of one subject in the field of interdisciplinary culture studies. Topics may include material culture, folklore, consumerism, public culture, critical theory, cultural identity and language and representation. (C)

311. Youth, Power and Social Movements (3)

This course examines contemporary youth involvement in social movements through the lens of social movement theory focusing in particular on youth activism in the post-Civil Rights era.

320. Topics in Environmental and Social Justice (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

The content of this course varies by semester. Topics may include: environmental justice, social movements, law and justice, race and nature, state violence, environmental social theory. (ESJ) 

321. Science, Nature and Anxiety in the Zombie Films of George Romero (3)

This course will examine the social commentary of George Romero's zombie films. We will consider how Romero's zombies serve as a vehicle to examine social anxieties regarding science, technology, nature, race, class and consumerism.

330 / 530. Topics in Gender Studies (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Varying subjects deriving from the contemporary cultural studies focus on matters of gender. Topics include: feminist theory; gender and nature; the factor of gender in disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies. (GS)

340. Topics in Popular Culture (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Content varies by semester. Topics include: popular music, popular culture of the 1960s; sex and gender in popular culture; chicano/a vernacular culture; black popular culture; popular environmentalism. (PC)

341 [341 / 541]. Topics in Film (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Varying subjects, based in theoretical and/or historical approaches. Topics include: sex and gender in popular film; films of the nuclear age; African-American film; ethnicity in American cinema; film theory. (PC)

343. Urban Legends (3)

This course will examine the origins, transmissions, and embedded meanings within contemporary urban legends, with a specific focus on how these legends both perpetuate and reflect attitudes toward race, gender, and politics. (PC)

346. Religion in New Mexico (3)

(Also offered as RELG 346) This course examines New Mexican religion from the seventeenth century onward, considering how life here shapes religious practice, and how religion factors in how visitors imagine and represent inhabitants.

348. Hip Hop and Ya Don't Stop (3)

This course provides a rigorous historical and theoretical understanding of the emergence of hip hop culture as what many consider the most dynamic youth expressive form emerging from the latter half of the 20th century.

350 / 550. Topics in Race, Class, Ethnicity (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Offers specialized topics on an alternating basis dealing with race, class and ethnicity in the formation of American life and society. Subject areas include immigration, class formation, conquest, colonization, public policy and civil rights. (RCE)

351. Blacks in the Southwest (3)

(Also offered as AFST 307) A survey of the lives of Blacks in the American West (1528–1918). (RCE)

353. Race Relations in America (3)

An interdisciplinary investigation of the development of race as a set of power relations, lived identities and ideas. Pays particular attention to the relationship of race to work, immigration, gender, culture and intellectual life. (RCE)

356 / 556. Topics in Native American Studies (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Topical survey of theoretical approaches, research methodologies and subject areas within the interdisciplinary field of Native American Studies. (RCE)

357 [357 / 557]. Topics in African-American Studies (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Offers topics addressing African-American social, cultural, political and intellectual life. Topics include: black social movements, African-American intellectual history, black cultural studies, slavery in the Americas. (RCE)

358 / 558. Topics in Latino/a Studies (3)

This interdisciplinary topics course examines the fastest growing population in the U.S. and includes Latino intellectual history, political and economic relations, recovery projects, music, film and media representations and environment, community and post-colonial studies. (RCE)

360 / 560. Topics in Southwest Studies (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Offers topics dealing with the social, cultural and technological developments among the people of the Southwest. Topics include folk art and material culture; rural, urban and border communities; traditional healing; travel and tourism; Hispano/Chicanos after 1848. (SS)

363. Chicano/Latino Film (3)

Covers the Chicano/Latino experience through its depiction on film and from the perspective of Latino filmmaking. The course analyzes film as communication, film narration, symbolism and subjectivity. (SS)

385. Theories and Methods of American Studies (3)

Introduces students to interdisciplinary approaches in the study of American culture, focusing on “Race, Ethnicity, Gender and National Identity,” “Media, Popular Culture, and Cultural Studies,” “Critical Regionalism,” and “Environment, Science and Technology.” (G) {Fall}

468. Navajo Expressive Culture (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 468/568, MUS 468/568, THEA 468/568) Examination of contemporary Diné (Navajo) politics and art (music, Navajo language, photography, dance, radio, filmmaking, comedy, weaving, poetry). Weekly guest speakers, readings from ethnomusicology, anthropology, critical indigenous studies. Includes overnight field trip to Navajo Nation. {Fall}

485. Senior Seminar in the Culture of the United States (3)

An analysis of the value of synthesis in liberal scholarship. Focus will be on cooperative interdisciplinary research. (G) {Spring only}

486. Senior Seminar in Southwest Studies (3)

Capstone course for majors/minors in the Southwest Studies that synthesizes current scholarship on critical regionalism: borderlands studies, trans-nationalism, indigeneity, immigration and other topics. Students develop research, analysis and writing to produce an original research paper. (SS)

497. Individual Study (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

(G)

*498. Internship (1-6)

Involves internships in off-campus learning experiences related to the study of American and regional culture and character, such as work in local communities and with relevant institutions. (G)

499. Honors Thesis (3)

Development and writing of senior honors thesis under supervision of Faculty Advisor. (G) Prerequisite: 2110. Restriction: permission of Undergraduate Director. {Spring}

500. American Culture Study Seminar (3)

Examines the basic texts and methods in the field of American studies through discussion and critical/analytical writing assignments. Required for all American Studies graduate students; restricted to graduate students in the department. (G) {Fall}

501. Theories and Methods in American Studies (3)

Introducing students to a range of American Studies theories and methods, this spring seminar is the second in the required sequence of the American Studies core graduate curriculum and builds on the American Studies proseminar. Prerequisite: 500. Restriction: admitted to M.A. American Studies or Ph.D. American Studies.

502. Research Methods Practicum (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This seminar reviews: 1) archival and library research; 2) data collection and fieldwork (plus subsequent analysis and presentation of data); 3) processes of hypotheses and theory building; and 4) development of a research proposal. (G) Prerequisite: 500 and 501. Restriction: admitted to M.A. American Studies or Ph.D. American Studies. {Spring}

509 / 309. Topics in Social Movements (3, may be repeated once Δ)

An interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of social movements, focusing on cultural and social formations of these movements. Topics include: folklore of social movements; labor struggles; peace movements; land conflicts. (C)

510 / 310. Topics in Cultural Studies (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

An in-depth study of one subject in the field of interdisciplinary culture studies. Topics may include material culture, folklore, consumerism, public culture, critical theory, cultural identity and postcolonial studies. (C)

512. Transnational American Studies (3)

Decentering the U.S. from its sense of entitlement to America, this course explores hemispheric relations, the history of the U.S. as an imperial power, and the current context of the transnationalization and globalization of cultures. (C)

517. Visual Culture (3)

This course will investigate the role of visual experience in everyday life. The assigned works represent a variety of interdisciplinary approaches to American visual culture, including photography, film, television, material culture, and public art. (C)

519. Topics in Cultural History (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Graduate seminars; content varies. Topics include: democracy, culture and history; American landscapes; history and narrative. (C)

520. Topics in Environmental and Social Justice (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Graduate study of subjects in Environmental and Social Justice. Content varies by semester and topics may include: science/technology studies, environmental justice, political economy of nature, environmental social movements, race and nature, law and violence. (ESJ)

523. Environmentalism of the Poor (3)

This class examines struggles over life itself from the perspective of poor communities. It considers how people organize against a world in which poor communities lack the basic conditions for a healthy life. 

530 / 330. Topics in Gender Studies (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Varying subjects deriving from the contemporary cultural studies focus on matters of gender. Topics include: feminist theory; gender and nature; the factor of gender in disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies. (GS)

550 / 350. Topics in Race, Class, Ethnicity (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Offers specialized topics on an alternating basis dealing with race, class and ethnicity in the formation of American life and society. Subject areas include immigration, class formation, conquest, colonization, public policy and civil rights. (RCE)

552. Colonialism and Decolonization (3)

This graduate seminar is an interdisciplinary and comparative examination of the histories, practices, and consequences of modern colonialism and the variety of indigenous and anticolonial responses to these conditions.

556 / 356. Topics in Native American Studies (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Seminar offering topical survey of theoretical approaches, research methodologies and subject areas within the interdisciplinary field of Native American Studies. (RCE)

558 / 358. Topics in Latino/a Studies (3)

This interdisciplinary topics course examines the fastest growing population in the U.S. and includes Latino intellectual history, political and economic relations, recovery projects, music, film and media representations and environment, community and post-colonial studies. (RCE)

560 / 360. Topics in Southwest Studies (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Offers topics dealing with the social, cultural and technological developments among the people of the Southwest. Topics include folk art and material culture; rural, urban and border communities; traditional healing; travel and tourism; Hispano/Chicanos after 1848. (SS)

597. Individual Study-Master's Degree (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

(G)

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

(G) Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

697. Individual Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(G) For Ph.D. candidates only.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

(G) Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Anthropology (ANTH)


1115 [101]. Introduction to Anthropology (3)

Anthropology is the systematic study of the humanity both past and present. The course introduces students to the four subfields of anthropology, which include archaeology, biological, linguistic and cultural anthropology. Students will learn about the concepts and methods that anthropologists use to study our species and gain a broader perspective on the human experience. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

1140 [130]. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology [Cultures of the World] (3)

This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization, supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe. Meets New Mexico Lower Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

1155 [110]. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology [Language, Culture and the Human Animal] (3)

Dinwoodie, Gorbet. This is an introductory course which provides an overview of the discipline of Linguistic Anthropology. The course will discuss the implications of language within anthropology, as well as within the sciences and social sciences more generally. The course explores the core concepts and methods of linguistic anthropology, such as the basic structure of language, first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, and social and regional variations that are used to help students understand what it means to be human and the role of language in human societies. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

1170 [160]. Human Life Course (3)

Biology and behavior of the human life course, including the evolution of the life history patterns specific to humans and the impact of population growth and of adaptation to local conditions in promoting human diversity. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 1170L.

1170L [161L]. Computer Laboratory in Human Evolutionary Ecology (1)

Introduces the computer as a tool in biological and social science research, provides first-hand experience in data collection, analysis and modeling behavior. No prior computer experience required. Pre- or corequisite: 1170.

1175 [150]. Evolution and Human Emergence (3)

This course provides a basic introduction to the broad field of biological anthropology. The research interests of biological anthropologists include the history and development of modern evolutionary biology, molecular and population genetics, modern primates, the primate and human fossil record, and modern human biological diversity. Biological Anthropology concentration students are required, and others are encouraged, to enroll concurrently in 1175L. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

1175L [151L]. Evolution and Human Emergence Laboratory [Human Evolution Laboratory] (1)

This laboratory course expand on the topics covered in lecture course and uses scientific methods and principles to examine evidence for the process of evolution, the nature of heredity, human evolutionary history and family tree relationships, primate ecology and behavior, and modern human diversity. Hands-on experience with fossil and skeletal material will be an important part of the learning process. Recommended, but not required, that this be taken concurrently with 1175. Two hours lab.

1211 [120]. Archaeological Method and Theory (3)

This course introduces students to field and laboratory methods and techniques in archeology. Students learn the standards of archeological field recording, excavation techniques and field-related laboratory skills. Fieldwork is required. Corequisite: 1211L.

1211L [122L]. Archaeological Method and Theory Laboratory (1)

Archaeology is the study of the human past through the analysis of material remains humans have left behind. This course explores the basic theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the discipline, as well as the techniques that archaeologists employ to describe the empirical world, produce data, and interpret how people lived in the past. Examples of archaeological research from around the world will be used to increase students’ understanding of concepts presented in lecture. Students will also apply the archeological principles in the laboratory portion of the course. Corequisite: 1211.

1996 [230]. Topics in Current Anthropology (3, no limit Δ)

Experimental courses on topics of current interest.

2175 [220]. World Archaeology (3)

Archaeology is the systematic study of the human past through material remains. This course introduces students to the physical remains of past societies and compares and contrasts archaeological development in different regions. Students will explore the dynamics of the human past and its influences on contemporary society.

2190C [251]. Forensic Anthropology (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the forensic investigation of death. Emphasis will be on current methods and techniques and include the role of the anthropologist as an integral member of the investigation process.

304. Current Research in Anthropology (1-3)

This course familiarizes students with current, active research in Anthropology by the University of New Mexico faculty and visiting scholars. It also teaches students to critically assess and discuss research questions. (A, EV, E)

310. Language and Culture (3)

(Also offered as CJ 319; LING 359) Examination of the interrelations of language and speech with other selected aspects of culture and cognition. (E) Prerequisite: 1155 or LING 2110 or LING 301.

317. Phonological Analysis (3)

(Also offered as LING 304 / 504) Introduction to patterns in sound structure, with an emphasis on problem-solving. Topics include distinctive features, common phonological processes, autosegmental theory and syllable structure. (E) Prerequisite: LING 301 and (LING 302 or LING 303 or SHS *303). {Fall}

*318. Grammatical Analysis (3)

(Also offered as LING 322 / 522) Principles of morphological and syntactic analysis and introduction to functional and formal theories of grammar. Descriptive analysis of grammatical structures and problems from a variety of languages. (E) Prerequisite: LING 301 or SIGN *305 or SPAN 351. {Spring}

320. Strategy of Archaeology (3)

The purpose and theory of the study of archaeology; relates archaeology to anthropological principles and the practice of science. (A) Prerequisite: 1211 and 1211L. {Yearly}

321 / 521. Southwest Archaeology (3)

An intensive survey of Southwest prehistory including discussion of major interpretative problems. Covers the period from 11,000 years ago to historic times. (A)

324 / 524. South American Archaeology (3)

Archaeology of South America from the Paleo-Indian to the European colonial period. Emphasizes the origins and evolution of Andean civilization and associated interpretive problems. (A) {Alternate years}

325 / 525. Stone Age Europe (3)

The prehistory of Europe with emphasis on hunter-gatherer adaptations of the Pleistocene and early Holocene, using primary data sources. (A) Prerequisite: 1115 or (1211 and 1211L) or 2175. {Alternate years}

327 / 527. African Prehistory (3)

The prehistory of Africa from the appearance of the first hominids to the development of complex societies. (A) Prerequisite: 1115 or (1211 and 1211L) or 2175. {Alternate years}

328 / 528. Near Eastern Archaeology (3)

A survey of the Near Eastern culture area from the origins of agriculture to the development of Bronze Age civilization. (A) {Offered periodically}

330. Principles of Cultural Anthropology (3)

Development of ideas and theories in sociocultural anthropology; focus on topics such as integration of human societies, sources of change in economic and cultural systems. (E)

332 / 532. Indigenous Peoples of South America (3)

Culture and history of indigenous peoples of South America. Selected examples from lowland and highland regions. (E) {Offered periodically}

333 / 533. Ritual Symbols and Behavior (3)

Ethnographic studies and a variety of anthropological approaches to ritual are read to examine the defining characteristics of ritual activity and its contemporary significance in peoples' lives. (E) {Offered periodically}

*337. Anthropology of New Mexico (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Topics will vary from instructor to instructor but will deal with specific social and cultural matters of anthropological interest in New Mexico such as folklore and expressive culture; social relations; tourism; environmental issues. (E) {Offered periodically}

339 / 539. Human Rights in Anthropology (3)

A description and analysis of competing theories about the content of human rights; the history, politics and economics of human rights situations. Emphasis on the interplay among power, difference, “culture” and human rights abuses. (E)

340 / 540. Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3, no limit Δ)

Current topics in sociocultural anthropology to be explored in experimental courses. (E)

*350. Human Biology (3)

Human heredity, variation and adaptation within and between different ecological and cultural settings; genetics; quantitative variation; elements of human population biology and human ecology. (EV) Prerequisite: 1175 or BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110C or BIOL 2410C. {Spring}

*351L. Anthropology of the Skeleton (4)

A laboratory course in the identification of human skeletal materials with attention to problems in the evolution of primates. Three lectures, 2 hours lab. (EV) {Fall}

357. Human Origins (3)

The events and processes involved in the emergence and evolution of the human lineage–from the origins of Australopithecus, through the emergence of the genus Homo, to the evolution of early modern humans–based on the human fossil record. (EV) Prerequisite: 1175 or 2175. {Alternate years}

360. Human Behavioral Ecology (3)

Introduces students to the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and their application to human behavior. It surveys current research on human sexuality, mate choice, reproduction and parenting from the perspective of human evolutionary ecology. (EV) Prerequisite: 1170 or 1175 or BIOL 1110.

361 [361 / 661]. Behavioral Ecology and Biology of Sex Roles (3)

Uses the perspective of evolutionary biology to examine the diversity of sex roles played by men and women in the historical and cross-cultural record. (EV) Restriction: junior or senior standing. {Alternate years}

362 / 662. Great Apes: Mind and Behavior (3)

Explores recent research in both captivity and the wild on cognition and behavior of great apes (chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos, orangutans), the closest living relatives of humans. (EV) Restriction: upper-division standing. {Alternate years}

363 / 563. Primate Social Behavior (3)

Special emphasis will be on strategies of survival, reproduction, mating and rearing, in the complex social systems of apes and monkeys. The costs and benefits of alternative strategies are used to understand individual life histories. (EV) Restriction: upper-division standing. {Alternate years}

364. Topics: Human Evolutionary Ecology (3, no limit Δ)

This course offers specific, in-depth discussions of topics of current faculty interests and student demand including collective action, single parenthood and child health, hunter-gatherers, psychological anthropology and conservation of resources. (EV)

*371. Pre-Columbian Cultures of Ancient Mexico (3)

Archaeological survey of the cultures of ancient Mexico from earliest inhabitants to the period of the Spanish Conquest. This course explores environmental, social, and political aspects of the rise and fall of societies across Mexico. (E)

*373. Technical Studies in Archaeology (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Technical course with variable content dealing with such issues as dating, paleoenvironmental and subsistence studies in archaeology. (A) {Offered periodically}

375 / 575. Archaeology Field Session (2-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intensive instruction in archaeological field and laboratory techniques and the opportunity for independent student research. (A) Restriction: permission of instructor.

*376. Maya Prehistory and Archaeology (3)

Surveys the development of the Maya civilizations in Mesoamerica from the origins of agriculture through the Spanish Conquest. The course will explore archaeological, ethno-historical, linguistic, and environmental data and accounts. (A) Prerequisite: 1115 or (1211 and 1211L) or 2175 or 320.

378 / 578. Indigenous Mexico (3)

Introduction to cultural and linguistic diversity of indigenous groups in Mexico, designed to prepare students for study in Oaxaca. Concentration on indigenous peoples of Southern Mexico and Mesoamerica, including Zapotec, Mixtec, Mixe, and Maya groups. Restriction: permission of instructor.

381 / 581. The Anthropology of Heritage (3)

This class explores ethical issues and debates surrounding heritage-making practices and discourses through lens of ethnological, archaeological, and evolutionary anthropology. It problematizes the boundaries between different constructions of the past and present.

383 / 583. Ethnology Field School (3)

Intensive instruction in ethnographic field and analysis techniques and the opportunity for independent student research. Restriction: permission of instructor.

395 / 595. Paleoindians: Colonizing the Americas (3)

Presents and interprets the earliest archeology of North America from the terminal Pleistocene through the early Holocene including relevant archeological evidence from eastern Eurasia and South America. Restriction: permission of instructor.

399. Introduction to Field and Laboratory Research (1-6 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Directed study under the supervision of a faculty member. (A, E, EV) Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

401 / 501. Native American Art I (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 402 / 502) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Arctic Northwest coast and the eastern woodlands of North America. (E) {Fall}

403 / 503. Native American Art II (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 406 / 506) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Plains, Southwest and western regions of North America. (E) {Spring}

410 / 510. Topics in Linguistic Anthropology (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Topics from various areas of anthropological linguistics including, but not limited to, ethnosemantics, the ethnography of communication and the biology of language. (E)

*420. Topics in Archaeology (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Topics of archaeological interest including gender in archaeology, European contact and post-processualism. (A)

445 / 545. Country Music and Cultural Politics (3)

(Also offered as MUS 445 / 545) Investigation of country music from an anthropological and ethnomusicological perspective, utilizing recordings and live performances to put scholarship on country music into conversation with social theory and literature on social class, gender, space/place, racial identities. {Spring}

448 / 548. The Anthropology of Music and Sound (3)

(Also offered as MUS 448 / 548) The cultural study of music and sound. Course materials are drawn from written and audio music ethnographies of contemporary indigenous, diasporic, refugee, exile, and industrial communities. (E)

*450. Topics in Biological Anthropology (3-4 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

(EV)

451 / 651. Bioarcheology (3)

The analysis of the skeletal remains from past human populations, oriented at the mortality, morbidity and genetic affinities of those extinct populations. (EV) Prerequisite: *351L. {Alternate years}

452 / 552. Primate Evolution (3)

This seminar reviews issues in primate taxonomy, functional and behavioral reconstructions, phylogenetic relationships, and macroevolutionary patterns. The intent of this course is to put primates into a broader evolutionary perspective.

453L / 553L. Paleoecology Lab (3)

This course explores reconstruction of paleoecosystems, climates, and ecologies. Students receive laboratory training in techniques including dental microwear and stable isotope analyses. We also examine paleoecological studies through readings of recent literature.

454 / 554. Human Paleopathology (4)

Ancient disease through the study of normal and abnormal bone remodeling processes and dental conditions. Population health evaluated by descriptive and radiologic analyses of human remains. (EV) Prerequisite: *351L. {Alternate years}

455 / 555. Anthropological Genetics (3)

This course examines theory, data and methods used by genetic anthropologists to address questions about human origins and prehistory, race, natural selection, disease, and the social and scientific implications of research in genetic anthropology. (EV) Prerequisite: 1175 or BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110C or BIOL 2410C. {Alternate years}

457 / 557. Paleoanthropology (3)

Events and processes leading from the appearance of the human lineage to the beginnings of agriculture, with discussions of Australopithecus and the genus Homo, through Homo sapiens. (EV) Prerequisite: *351L. {Alternate years}

458 / 558. Dental Anthropology (4)

A laboratory class that explores the application of data from human and non-human dentitions to anthropological questions. Topics covered include dental anatomy, development, evolution, variation, and pathology. Prerequisite: 1175.

459. Advanced Osteology (3)

This course is to further develop the skills of graduate and senior undergraduate students in human osteology and to introduce advanced methods of skeletal analysis. Both lecture and laboratory components. (EV) Prerequisite: *351L.

464 / 564. Human Behavioral Evolution (3)

Behavioral transitions throughout human evolution, including social systems, diet, life history, intelligence and locomotion. Focus on hominid origins, the transition from ape-like to human-like hominid, and the origin of our own species. Prerequisite: 357.

468 / 568. Navajo Expressive Culture (3)

(Also offered as AMST 468, MUS 468/568, THEA 468/568) Examination of contemporary Diné (Navajo) politics and art (music, Navajo language, photography, dance, radio, filmmaking, comedy, weaving, poetry). Weekly guest speakers, readings from ethnomusicology, anthropology, critical indigenous studies. Includes overnight field trip to Navajo Nation. {Fall}

473L / 573L. Archaeological Measurement and Laboratory Analysis (4)

Emphasizes the methods and techniques employed to construct and analyze archaeological materials. Style, function and technology of flaked and ground stone and ceramics are considered. Coursework includes readings, discussions and laboratory exercises. Exercises focus on the construction, analysis and interpretation of data. (A) Prerequisite: 320. {Alternate years}

480 / 580. Ceramic Analysis (3)

Basic concepts, methods and approaches used in the analysis of archaeological pottery. Lectures cover concepts and strategies. Labs give practical experience with techniques of analysis. (A) {Spring}

482L / 582L. Geoarchaeology (3)

(Also offered as EPS 482L / 582L) Application of geological concepts to archaeological site formation with emphasis on pre-ceramic prehistory of the southwestern United States. Quaternary dating methods, paleoenvironment, landscape evolution, depositional environments. Quaternary stratigraphy, soil genesis, sourcing of lithic materials, site formation processes. Required field trip. (A) Prerequisite: 1211 and 1211L and 2175 and GEOL 1110 and GEOL 1110L. Restriction: junior standing. {Alternate years}

484 / 584. Zooarchaeology (3)

Basic concepts, methods and approaches in the analysis of animal remains from archaeological sites. Lectures cover history, theory and current applications of zooarchaeology. Labs provide practical experience in zooarchaeological identification and analysis.

485 / 585. Seminar in Museum Methods (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, MSST 485 / 585) Theoretical and practical work in specific museum problems. May be repeated as subject matter changes. (E) Prerequisite: ARTH 407 or MSST 407. {Offered upon demand}

486 / 586. Practicum: Museum Methods (1-3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, MSST 486 / 586) Practicum in museum methods and management. (E) Prerequisite: ARTH 407 or MSST 407. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

491 / 591. Population Genetics (3)

(Also offered as BIOL 491 / 591) This course investigates how genetic variation is patterned within and between and how these patterns change over time. Topics include neutral theory, population structure, phylogenetics, coalescent theory, molecular clock, and laboratory methods. (EV)

497. Individual Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Directed study of topics not covered in regular courses. (A, E, EV)

498. Honors Seminar (3)

Readings and discussions concerning anthropological research methods, sources, goals and professional ethics. Open to upper-division majors and concentrators whose applications for the honors program have been approved. (A, E, EV) Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

*499. Field Research (2-6 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Field research for qualified advanced undergraduate or graduate students with previous experience in archaeology, biological anthropology, human evolutionary ecology, linguistics or general ethnology. Problems are selected on the basis of student-faculty interest and field research opportunities. (A, E, EV) Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

501 / 401. Native American Art I (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 502 / 402) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Arctic Northwest coast and the eastern woodlands of North America. (E) {Fall}

502. Center for Stable Isotopes Seminar (1, may be repeated eight times Δ)

(Also offered as EPS 502) Students will be exposed to cutting edge isotope-focused interdisciplinary research in a lecturer, discussion and constructive feedback setting. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

503 / 403. Native American Art II (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 506 / 406) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Plains, Southwest and western regions of North America. (E) {Spring}

509. Seminar in Native American Art (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH 559) (E) Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

510 / 410. Topics in Linguistic Anthropology (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Topics from various areas of anthropological linguistics including, but not limited to, ethnosemantics, the ethnography of communication and the biology of language. (E)

514. Seminar: Linguistic Theory (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as LING 554) Current topics and issues in phonology, syntax or semantics. (E)

521 / 321. Southwest Archaeology (3)

An intensive survey of Southwest prehistory including discussion of major interpretative problems. Covers the period from 11,000 years ago to historic times. (A) {Fall}

522. Lithic Analysis (3)

Examines how flaked stone artifacts can be studied and contribute to archaeological research. Includes such topics as raw material procurement; manufacturing technology; tool morphology, function, and style; debitage; and theoretical frameworks. Restriction: admitted to Anthropology graduate program.

523. Quantitative Analysis in Archaeology (3)

Application of quantitative methods to archaeological questions and data. Lectures cover statistical tests common in archaeological analysis and their proper use. Labs provide hands-on experience in quantitative data analysis.

524 / 324. South American Archaeology (3)

Archaeology of South America from the Paleo-Indian to the European colonial period. Emphasizes the origins and evolution of Andean civilization and associated interpretive problems. (A) {Alternate years}

525 / 325. Stone Age Europe (3)

The prehistory of Europe with emphasis on hunter-gatherer adaptations of the Pleistocene and early Holocene, using primary data sources. (A) Prerequisite: 1115 or (1211 and 1211L) or 2175. {Alternate years}

527 / 327. African Prehistory (3)

Straus. The prehistory of Africa from the appearance of the first hominids to the development of complex societies. (A) Prerequisite: 1115 or (1211 and 1211L) or 2175. {Alternate years}

528 / 328. Near Eastern Archaeology (3)

A survey of the Near Eastern culture area from the origins of agriculture to the development of Bronze Age civilization. (A) {Offered periodically}

529. Archaeology of Complex Societies (3)

Comparative approach to origin and development of stratified societies and pristine states as known from the archaeological record. (A)

530. Topics in Ethnology (3, no limit Δ)

Current topics in ethnology to be explored in experimental seminars. (E)

532 / 332. Indigenous Peoples of South America (3)

Culture and history of indigenous peoples of South America. Selected examples from lowland and highland regions. (E) {Offered periodically}

533 / 333. Ritual Symbols and Behavior (3)

Ethnographic studies and a variety of anthropological approaches to ritual are read to examine the defining characteristics of ritual activity and its contemporary significance in peoples' lives. (E) {Offered annually}

537. Seminar: Southwestern Ethnology (3)

Examination of data and theories relevant to study of Indian, Hispanic and dominant society cultures in southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. Student research generated from students professional interests. Non-majors admitted. (E)

539 / 339. Human Rights in Anthropology (3)

A description and analysis of competing theories about the content of human rights; the history, politics and economics of human rights situations. Emphasis on the interplay among power, difference, “culture” and human rights abuses. (E)

540 / 340. Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3, no limit Δ)

Current topics in sociocultural anthropology to be explored in experimental courses. (E)

541. Problems and Practice in Ethnography (3)

A practicum in ethnographic methods and theory. (E)

545 / 445. Country Music and Cultural Politics (3)

(Also offered as MUS 545 / 445) Investigation of country music from an anthropological and ethnomusicological perspective, utilizing recordings and live performances to put scholarship on country music into conversation with social theory and literature on social class, gender, space/place, racial identities. {Spring}

546. Theory in Ethnology I (3)

Early history of anthropology from 19th-century cultural evolutionists to anthropology of the mid-20th century. Contributions of Historical School, Structural Functionalists and Neo-Evolutionists. (E) {Fall}

547. Theory in Ethnology II (3)

Early history of anthropology from 19th-century cultural evolutionists to anthropology of the mid-20th century. Contributions of Historical School, Structural Functionalists and Neo-Evolutionists. (E) {Fall}

548 / 448. The Anthropology of Music and Sound (3)

(Also offered as MUS 448 / 548) The cultural study of music and sound. Course materials are drawn from written and audio music ethnographies of contemporary indigenous, diasporic, refugee, exile, and industrial communities. (E) Restriction: permission of instructor.

550. Topics in Biological Anthropology (3-4 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

(EV)

552 / 452. Primate Evolution (3)

This seminar reviews issues in primate taxonomy, functional and behavioral reconstructions, phylogenetic relationships, and macroevolutionary patterns. The intent of this course is to put primates into a broader evolutionary perspective.

553L / 453L. Paleoecology Lab (3)

This course explores reconstruction of paleoecosystems, climates, and ecologies. Students receive laboratory training in techniques including dental microwear and stable isotope analyses. We also examine paleoecological studies through readings of recent literature.

554 / 454. Human Paleopathology (4)

Ancient disease through the study of normal and abnormal bone remodeling processes and dental conditions. Population health evaluated by descriptive and radiologic analyses of human remains. (EV) Prerequisite: *351L. {Alternate years}

555 / 455. Anthropological Genetics (3)

This course examines theory, data and methods used by genetic anthropologists to address questions about human origins and prehistory, race, natural selection, disease, and the social and scientific implications of research in genetic anthropology. (EV) Prerequisite: 1175 or BIOL 1110 or BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110C or BIOL 2410C. {Alternate years}

557 / 457. Paleoanthropology (3)

Events and processes leading from the appearance of the human lineage to the beginnings of agriculture, with discussions of Australopithecus and the genus Homo, through Homo sapiens. (EV) Prerequisite: *351L. {Alternate years}

558 / 458. Dental Anthropology (4)

A laboratory class that explores the application of data from human and non-human dentitions to anthropological questions. Topics covered include dental anatomy, development, evolution, variation, and pathology. Prerequisite: 1175.

560. Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Anthropology (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Topics of interest including Critical reading, Anthropological economics, Life history strategies, Primate reproductive strategies, Game theory. (EV)

562. Human Life History (3)

In-depth treatment of human life history evolution. Covers basic population demography; mortality, senescence, menopause, mating, reproduction, parental investment with additional focus on brain evolution. Experiences in evaluation and building mathematical models of fitness trade-offs. (EV) Prerequisite: (360 or BIOL 300) and MATH 1220.

563 / 363. Primate Social Behavior (3)

Special emphasis will be on strategies of survival, reproduction, mating and rearing, in the complex social systems of apes and monkeys. The costs and benefits of alternative strategies are used to understand individual life histories. (EV) {Alternate years}

564 / 464. Human Behavioral Evolution (3)

Behavioral transitions throughout human evolution, including social systems, diet, life history, intelligence and locomotion. Focus on hominid origins, the transition from ape-like to human-like hominid, and the origin of our own species. Prerequisite: 357.

567. Human Behavioral Ecology and Life History (3)

This course offers an advanced survey of human behavioral ecology and life history theory and their relationship to evolutionary psychology and cultural evolutionary theory. It describes humans¿ unique behavior and reproduction in evolutionary perspective. Prerequisite: 1170 or 360 or BIOL 300 or BIOL *455.

568 / 468. Navajo Expressive Culture (3)

(Also offered as AMST 468, MUS 568/468, THEA 568/468) Examination of contemporary Diné (Navajo) politics and art (music, Navajo language, photography, dance, radio, filmmaking, comedy, weaving, poetry). Weekly guest speakers, readings from ethnomusicology, anthropology, critical indigenous studies. Includes overnight field trip to Navajo Nation. {Fall}

570. Advanced Topics in Archaeology (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

(A)

572. Science in Archaeology (3)

Advanced seminar on science-based methods of analysis applied to archaeological materials covering analytical units, chronometric and relative dating, taphonomy, zooarchaeology, geochemistry, paleoclimate, paleoecology, paleodiet and other molecular methods.

573. Topics in Advanced Technical Studies in Archaeology (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

(A)

573L / 473L. Archaeological Measurement and Laboratory Analysis (4)

Emphasizes the methods and techniques employed to construct and analyze archaeological materials. Style, function and technology of flaked and ground stone and ceramics are considered. Coursework includes readings, discussions and laboratory exercises. Exercises focus on the construction, analysis and interpretation of data. (A) Prerequisite: 320. {Alternate years}

574. History and Theory of Archaeology (3)

Advanced discussion of concepts and theories within world archaeology. The course emphasizes the structure of archaeological thought in culture history, new archaeology, evolutionary theory and post-modernism. (A) Restriction: admitted to Anthropology graduate program. {Fall}

575 / 375. Archaeology Field Session (2-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intensive instruction in archaeological field and laboratory techniques and the opportunity for independent student research. (A) Restriction: permission of instructor.

576. Seminar: Southwestern Archaeology (3)

In-depth analysis of current research issues and topics in Southwest archaeology. (A)

577. Seminar: European Prehistory (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Explores critical issues and debates in different periods of European prehistory, based on primary sources. (A)

578 / 378. Indigenous Mexico (3)

Introduction to cultural and linguistic diversity of indigenous groups in Mexico, designed to prepare students for study in Oaxaca. Concentration on indigenous peoples of Southern Mexico and Mesoamerica, including Zapotec, Mixtec, Mixe, and Maya groups. Restriction: permission of instructor.

579. Current Debates in Archaeology (3)

Advanced discussion of current theoretical debates in archaeology, including Processual and Post-processual paradigms, formation processes; middle-range, optimal foraging, evolutionary, hunter-gatherer mobility theories; cultural ecology; and origins of agriculture and complex society. (A)

580 / 480. Ceramic Analysis (3)

Basic concepts, methods and approaches used in the analysis of archaeological pottery. Lectures cover concepts and strategies. Labs give practical experience with techniques of analysis. (A)

581 / 381. The Anthropology of Heritage (3)

This class explores ethical issues and debates surrounding heritage-making practices and discourses through lens of ethnological, archaeological, and evolutionary anthropology. It problematizes the boundaries between different constructions of the past and present.

582L / 482L. Geoarchaeology (3)

(Also offered as EPS 582L / 482L) Application of geological concepts to archaeological site formation with emphasis on pre-ceramic prehistory of the southwestern United States. Quaternary dating methods, paleoenvironment, landscape evolution, depositional environments. Quaternary stratigraphy, soil genesis, sourcing of lithic materials, site formation processes. Required field trip. (A) {Alternate years}

583 / 383. Ethnology Field School (3)

Intensive instruction in ethnographic field and analysis techniques and the opportunity for independent student research. Restriction: permission of instructor.

584 / 484. Zooarchaeology (3)

Basic concepts, methods and approaches in the analysis of animal remains from archaeological sites. Lectures cover history, theory and current applications of zooarchaeology. Labs provide practical experience in zooarchaeological identification and analysis.

585 / 485. Seminar in Museum Methods (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, MSST 585 / 485) Theoretical and practical work in specific museum problems. May be repeated as subject matter changes. (E) Prerequisite: ARTH 507 or MSST 507. {Offered upon demand}

586 / 486. Practicum: Museum Methods (1-3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, MSST 586 / 486) Practicum in museum methods and management. (E) Prerequisite: ARTH 507 or MSST 507. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

591 / 491. Population Genetics (3)

(Also offered as BIOL 591 / 491) This course investigates how genetic variation is patterned within and between and how these patterns change over time. Topics include neutral theory, population structure, phylogenetics, coalescent theory, molecular clock, and laboratory methods. (EV)

592. Managing Cultural Resources (3)

Examines the history and philosophy of statutes, regulations, consultation processes, research directions and funding sources underlying management of archaeological sites, traditional cultural properties, historic buildings, cultural and historical landscapes, and museum collections. (A)

595 / 395. Paleoindians: Colonizing the Americas (3)

Presents and interprets the earliest archeology of North America from the terminal Pleistocene through the early Holocene including relevant archeological evidence from eastern Eurasia and South America.

597. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(A, E, EV) Restriction: admitted to M.A. Anthropology or M.S. Anthropology.

598. Advanced Research (3, no limit Δ)

(A, E, EV) Restriction: admitted to M.A. Anthropology or M.S. Anthropology.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. (A, E, EV)

620. Topics in Interdisciplinary Biological and Biomedical Sciences (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as BIOL 520, CS 520, ECE 620, STAT 520) Varying interdisciplinary topics taught by collaborative scientists from UNM, SFI, and LANL.

651 / 451. Bioarcheology (3)

The analysis of the skeletal remains from past human populations, oriented at the mortality, morbidity and genetic affinities of those extinct populations. (EV) Prerequisite: *351L.

662 / 362. Great Apes: Mind and Behavior (3)

Explores recent research in both captivity and the wild on cognition and behavior of great apes (chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos, orangutans), the closest living relatives of humans. (EV) {Alternate years}

663. Human Evolutionary Ecology Research Methods and Design (3)

Provides an overview of research design and methods utilized in the social/behavioral sciences and public health. It introduces a ‘top-down,’ problem-oriented approach to question development, sample selection, design decisions, specific methods, data analysis. (EV) {Alternate years}

675. Anthropological Research Proposals (3)

Exploration and evaluation of practical anthropological research designs. Exhaustive preparation of realistic grant proposals for specific student-generated projects, with intensive group criticism. (A, E, EV)

697. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Limited to graduate majors in the doctoral program. (A, E, EV)

698. Advanced Research (3, no limit Δ)

Limited to graduate majors in the doctoral program. (A, E, EV)

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. (A, E, EV)




Applied Music (APMS)


301. Studio Instruction for the Performance Concentration (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for the junior Bachelor of Music Performance concentration. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the music performance program leading to the Bachelor of Music; exceptions may be made with permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Music. Prerequisite: MUSC 2510. {Fall, Spring}

302. Studio Instruction for the Performance Concentration (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for the junior Bachelor of Music Performance concentration. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the music performance program leading to the Bachelor of Music; exceptions may be made with permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Music. Prerequisite: 301. {Fall, Spring}

319. Studio Instruction for the Non-Performance Concentration (1 or 2 to a maximum of 16 Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for juniors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Music, the Bachelor of Music Education, or the Bachelor of Music concentration in Theory and Composition, String Pedagogy or Jazz Studies. Also for the study of secondary instruments by any undergraduate music major. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Prerequisite: MUSC 2510. {Fall, Spring}

320. Studio Instruction for the Non-Performance Concentration (1 or 2 to a maximum of 16 Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for juniors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Music, the Bachelor of Music Education, or the Bachelor of Music concentration in Theory and Composition, String Pedagogy or Jazz Studies. Also for the study of secondary instruments by any undergraduate music major. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Prerequisite: 319. {Fall, Spring}

391. Junior Recital (0)

For the student pursuing the Bachelor of Music in Performance or Jazz Studies only. Must be taken in conjunction with the appropriate level of Studio Instruction: APMS 301 or 302 for the Performance concentration; APMS 319 or 320 for the Jazz Studies concentration. No extra lesson time is allotted for APMS 391. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Consult the Department of Music Undergraduate Student Handbook for requirements associated with the junior recital. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}

401. Studio Instruction for the Performance Concentration (4, may be repeated twice Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for the senior Bachelor of Music Performance concentration. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the music performance program leading to the Bachelor of Music; exceptions may be made with permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Music. Prerequisite: 302 and 391. {Fall, Spring}

402. Studio Instruction for the Performance Concentration (4, may be repeated twice Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for the senior Bachelor of Music Performance concentration. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the music performance program leading to the Bachelor of Music; exceptions may be made with permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Music. Prerequisite: 401. {Fall, Spring}

403. Vocal Coaching (0, no limit Δ)

Vocal coaching instruction, focusing on diction and style, designed to supplement studio instruction in voice. Student must be enrolled concurrently in applied voice lessons in either APMS 401 or 402. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 302. {Fall, Spring}

419. Studio Instruction for the Non-Performance Concentration (1 or 2 to a maximum of 16 Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for seniors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Music, the Bachelor of Music Education, or the Bachelor of Music concentration in Theory and Composition, String Pedagogy or Jazz Studies. Also for the study of secondary instruments by any undergraduate music major. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Prerequisite: 320. {Fall, Spring}

420. Studio Instruction for the Non-Performance Concentration (1 or 2 to a maximum of 16 Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument for seniors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts in Music, the Bachelor of Music Education, or the Bachelor of Music concentration in Theory and Composition, String Pedagogy or Jazz Studies. Also for the study of secondary instruments by any undergraduate music major. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Prerequisite: 419. {Fall, Spring}

491. Senior Recital (0)

For the student pursuing the Bachelor of Music in Performance, String Pedagogy, Theory and Composition or Jazz Studies, or the Bachelor of Music Education only. Must be taken in conjunction with the appropriate level of Studio Instruction: APMS 401 or 402 for Performance concentration; APMS 419 or 420 for String Pedagogy, Jazz Studies or B.M.E.; APMS 319, 320, 419 or 420 for Theory and Composition. No extra lesson time is allotted for APMS 491. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Consult the Department of Music Undergraduate Student Handbook for requirements associated with the senior recital. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}

501. Studio Instruction in the Principal Area of Concentration (2 or 4, no limit Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument (including voice) for students pursuing the Master of Music concentration in Performance or Collaborative Piano. Studio instruction in the principal area of concentration for students pursuing the Master of Music concentration in Theory and Composition. Enrollment requires instructor's approval. Restriction: admitted to M.Mu. Music. {Fall, Spring}

502. Studio Instruction in the Principal Area of Concentration (2 or 4, no limit Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument (including voice) for students pursuing the Master of Music concentration in Performance or Collaborative Piano. Studio instruction in the principal area of concentration for students pursuing the Master of Music concentration in Theory and Composition. Enrollment requires instructor's approval. Prerequisite: four credit hours of 501. Restriction: admitted to M.Mu. Music. {Fall, Spring}

503. Vocal Coaching (0, no limit Δ)

Vocal coaching instruction, focusing on diction and style, designed to supplement studio instruction in voice. Student must be enrolled concurrently in applied voice lessons in either APMS 501, 502 or 591. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}

519. Studio Instruction Outside the Principal Area of Concentration (1 or 2, no limit Δ)

Studio instruction in instruments (including voice), conducting or composition. For the study of secondary instrument or area by any graduate student in Music, or for the study of the principal instrument by students pursuing the Master of Music concentration in Conducting, Music Education, Theory and Composition, or Music History and Literature. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Restriction: admitted to M.Mu. Music. {Fall, Spring}

520. Studio Instruction Outside the Principal Area of Concentration (1 or 2, no limit Δ)

Studio instruction in instruments (including voice), conducting or composition. For the study of secondary instrument or area by any graduate student in Music, or for the study of the principal instrument by students pursuing the Master of Music concentration in Conducting, Music Education, Theory and Composition, or Music History and Literature. Enrollment requires instructor’s approval. Restriction: admitted to M.Mu. Music. {Fall, Spring}

591. Studio Instruction and Graduate Recital (2 or 4, no limit Δ)

Studio instruction in the principal instrument or area of concentration for students pursuing the Master of Music in Performance, Conducting or Collaborative Piano. Course requirements include successful completion of the graduate recital. Consult the University of New Mexico Catalog and the Department of Music Graduate Student Handbook for requirements associated with the graduate recital. Maximum 4 credit hours allowed in a given instrument (including voice) or area of concentration. Enrollment requires instructor's approval. Prerequisite: 502 or MUS 572. Restriction: admitted to M.Mu. Music. {Fall, Spring}




Arabic (See also: ARBC) (ARAB)


101. Elementary Arabic I (3)

A course in elementary modern Arabic.

102. Elementary Arabic II (3)

A course for those with very minimum exposure to modern Arabic language.

201. Intermediate Arabic I (3)

The course covers the writing system, phonology, vocabulary, morphology and syntax structures of the Arabic language. Students will attend language laboratory to enhance their listening, comprehension and pronunciation skills.

301. Advanced Arabic I (3)

Improves functional use of Arabic language and culture. Class is for students with four years of Arabic study or for heritage speakers. Students will attend language laboratory to enhance their listening, comprehension, and pronunciation skills.

302. Advanced Arabic II (3)

Improves functional use of Arabic language and culture. Class is for students with four semesters of Arabic study or for heritage speakers. Students will attend language laboratory to enhance their listening, comprehension, and pronunciation skills.

320. Arabic Study Abroad (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An introduction to Arabic cultures and language through study abroad. Course locations vary according to course content.

375. Topics in Arabic Literature and Culture in Translation (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course involves the study of Arabic literature and culture in translation. No knowledge of Arabic is required.

475. Topics in Literature and Culture in Arabic (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course involves the study of Arabic literature and culture in the original language. Advanced abilities in Arabic are required.

497. Undergraduate Problems (1-6, may be repeated once Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.




Arabic (See also: ARAB) (ARBC)


1130 [ARAB 111]. Arabic I Intensive [Intensive Elementary Arabic I] (6)

Following this class, students will be able to perform in specific situations at the Novice High to Intermediate Low level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scale. All five modes of communication are addressed (interpersonal, presentational speaking, presentational writing, interpretive reading, and interpretive listening). Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and an Arabic dialect are taught using an integrated approach. Students will continue to develop their understanding of Arabic-speaking cultures.

2130 [ARAB 112]. Arabic II Intensive [Intensive Elementary Arabic II] (6)

Continuation of Arabic 1130. Following this class, students will be able to perform in specific situations at the Intermediate level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency scale. All five modes of communication are addressed (interpersonal, presentational speaking, presentational writing, interpretive reading, and interpretive listening). Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and an Arabic dialect are taught using an integrated approach. Students will continue to develop their understanding of Arabic-speaking cultures.

2140 [ARAB 211]. Intermediate Arabic I Intensive [Intensive Intermediate Arabic I] (6)

Intensive Arabic language course that develops students' Arabic skills to the ACTFL Intermediate Mid level and expands their cultural knowledge of the Arab world.

2150 [ARAB 212]. Intermediate Arabic II Intensive [Intensive Intermediate Arabic II] (6)

Intensive Arabic language course that develops students' Arabic skills to the ACTFL Intermediate High level and expands their cultural knowledge of the Arab world.




Architecture (ARCH)


109. Design Fundamentals (3)

Laboratory, lectures, and exercises to learn two and three-dimensional communication methods. Emphasis is on the use of physical model making to record and communicate architectural topics. 

111. Introduction to Architectural Graphics (3)

Laboratory, lectures, and exercises to learn graphic representation methods. Emphasis is on the use of drawing to record and communicate architectural topics.

1120 [121]. Introduction to Architecture (3)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the tools and vocabulary to analyze, interpret, and discuss the built environment from environmental, social, historical, perceptual and technical aspects. Lectures and assignments will introduce students to the elements of architecture from aesthetic, structural, functional and historical perspectives. The course will also provide students with the people and processes involved in professional issues of architectural practice. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

133. Physics and Math for Designers (3)

An introductory hands-on course. Assignments will help students understand and apply scientific and mathematical concepts in their design work. Topics include motion, stress and moment, structural loads, energy, heat flow, acoustics, descriptive geometry, and statistics.

201. Architectural Design I (5)

Studio analyzing landscape and site through mapping, diagramming, narrative, photography, digital and physical modeling and sectional studies. The relationship between the building program and the context is studied through a series of small building projects. Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

202. Architectural Design II (5)

Studio introduces principles of urban design and planning through an exploration of a series of multi-scaled architectural projects that examine public goals and constraints, urban infrastructure and fabric, sustainability, historical and socio-cultural issues. Prerequisite: 201. Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

211. Architectural Communications I (2, may be repeated once Δ)

This two term lecture/lab introduces architectural representation emphasizing digital visualization, representation and modeling to represent building systems, capture spatial concepts, and analyze the contexts of buildings. This course introduces use of the fabrication lab. Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

2120 [223]. World Architecture I [World Architecture I: History of the Built Environment From Prehistory to 1800 CE] (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 323 / 567) Lecture survey of the architectural and urban traditions of world cultures from prehistory to the Enlightenment. 

2125 [224]. World Architecture II [World Architecture II: History of the Built Environment From 1800 CE to the Present] (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 324) Survey of the architectural and urban traditions of the modern world from the Enlightenment to the present. 

233. Sustainability I (3)

Lectures present the framework for creative analysis, including systems thinking and synergistic integration of the three pillars of sustainability, environments, equity, and economy, and their relationship to building systems.

251. Design Thinking (3)

Lecture course introduces the theory and practice of Design Thinking. Students will explore frameworks and strategies for solving problems and develop an understanding of the disciplines that are influenced by them. 

301. Architectural Design III (5)

Studio investigates issues of private space and ownership emphasizing spatial, programmatic, typological and tectonic architectural issues. Small to medium scale projects range from domestic spaces to institutional or commercial environments.  Prerequisite: 201 and 202 with minimum grades of "C+". Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

302. Architectural Design IV (5)

Studio investigates the development of multi-family housing on an urban site. Students analyze contemporary housing precedents and programming, and address urban contexts, housing types and universal design.  Prerequisite: 301 with minimum grade of "C+". Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

311. Architectural Communication II (2, may be repeated once Δ)

In this two-term lecture/lab course students use narrative, written, and oral communication in the expression of architectural theories, processes, and positions. Readings and precedent studies help shape discussions about architectural theses.

323. Architecture and Context (3)

Combined lecture and lab course that introduces historical and contemporary concepts of architectural context, and develops verbal and graphic skills for analyzing architecture as a practice of place-making.  Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

324 / 624. Architectural Theory (3)

This course is a survey of architectural thought in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be required to read, discuss, and write about architectural ideas, and connect them to contemporary architecture.

331. Construction I (3)

Lab and lectures, introduction of technological aspects of building design and construction.  Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

332 / 532. Architectural Structures I (3)

Lectures present principles of mechanics, equilibrium conditions, properties of structural materials, structural properties of areas, shear and moment, flexural stresses, shearing stresses, deflection, trusses and funicular structures.  Prerequisite: 202. Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

333 / 533. Architectural Structures II (3)

Lectures present structural form and behavior, deflected shapes, approximate and simplified methods of analysis, graphic analysis, trusses, cables and arches, simple beams, columns, continuous structures, three-dimensional structures, structural design issues.  Prerequisite: 332. Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

401. Architectural Design Studio V (6)

Studio investigates urban theories and strategies focusing on civic buildings, urban design, landscape and infrastructural responses and architectural form. Projects are multiple buildings and urban forms in complex urban settings.  Prerequisite: 2125 and (302 with minimum grade of "C+"). Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

402. Architectural Design VI (6, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio explores contemporary architectural topics. Topics will vary. At least one section will engage community clients and may be offered in conjunction with Landscape Architecture and Community and Regional Planning students.  Prerequisite: 2125. Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

427 / 527. Southwest Architecture and Cultural Landscapes (3)

Introduction to the Native, Hispanic, and Anglo American architectural and cultural landscape traditions, and to the social, technological and intellectual forces reshaping them since 1880, especially the railroad and automobile; modernism, regionalism, and globalization. Prerequisite: 2125.

430 / 530. Foundations of Physical Planning (3)

(Also offered as CRP 533) This is an introductory course of physical planning practice for Planning, Architecture and Landscape students. Graphic methods of analysis, field trips, cross-disciplinary projects range from regional plans to design details of the built environment.  Prerequisite: CRP 265. Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture. {Spring} 

433 / 633. Sustainability II (3)

Explores the application of theoretical foundations of sustainability to building and landscape design including concepts of passive solar design, daylighting, water conservation, and green building materials and construction methods. Introduces environmental rating systems such as LEED.  Prerequisite: 233.

450 / 550. Design Leadership (3)

Lecture/seminar course explores the historical and contemporary relationships between political, cultural and economic theories that affect and are affected by built environments, along with the design movements and practices that result.  Prerequisite: 302 with minimum grade of "C+". Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

461 / 661. Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Students wishing to undertake a special study project must have instructor approval.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

462 / 662. Seminar (1-3, no limit Δ)

Individually listed topics vary each semester.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

463. Architecture and Design for Children (3)

A service learning course designed for architecture students and others teaching design education and architecture to teachers, children and others in the community.  Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

465 / 665. Real Estate Development (3)

Lecture course introduces students to the process of real estate through lectures, case studies and hands-on exercises.

472 / 572. Topics in Design Visualization (1-3, may be repeated six times Δ)

Topics course. Credits will vary according to content offered.

500. Graduate Architectural Design I (6)

Studio course introducing architectural design. Investigation of landscape, site and social contexts, private space, programmatic and tectonic issues.  Offered on a CR/NC basis only. 

501. Graduate Architectural Design II (6)

Projects emphasize the design of mid-size buildings with complex programming, and the spaces they compose in the urban realm. Students are introduced to designing within historical and socio-cultural contexts, sustainable design, and universal design.  Prerequisite: 500. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

502. Graduate Architectural Design III (6)

Projects emphasize the design of civic buildings, addressing theories and precedents in urban or rural sites, and developing knowledge and deployment of building tectonics and construction materiality.  Prerequisite: 501. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

523. World Architecture I: History of the Built Environment From Prehistory to 1800 CE (3)

(Also offered as ARTH 567 / 323) Lecture survey of the architectural and urban traditions of world cultures from prehistory to the Enlightenment.

524. World Architecture II: History of the Built Environment From 1800 CE to the Present (3)

Survey of the architectural and urban traditions of the modern world from the Enlightenment to the present. 

527 / 427. Southwest Architecture and Cultural Landscapes (3)

Introduction to the Native, Hispanic, and Anglo American architectural and cultural landscape traditions, and to the social, technological and intellectual forces reshaping them since 1880, especially the railroad and automobile; modernism, regionalism, and globalization. Prerequisite: 524.

530 / 430. Foundations of Physical Planning (3)

(Also offered as CRP 533) This is an introductory course of physical planning practice for Planning, Architecture and Landscape students. Graphic methods of analysis, field trips, cross-disciplinary projects range from regional plans to design details of the built environment. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture. {Spring}

531. Graduate Construction I (3)

Lab and lectures, introduction of technological aspects of building design and construction. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

532 / 332. Architectural Structures I (3)

Lectures present principles of mechanics, equilibrium conditions, properties of structural materials, structural properties of areas, shear and moment, flexural stresses, shearing stresses, deflection, trusses and funicular structures. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

533 / 333. Architectural Structures II (3)

Lectures present structural form and behavior, deflected shapes, approximate and simplified methods of analysis, graphic analysis, trusses, cables and arches, simple beams, columns, continuous structures, three-dimensional structures, structural design issues. Prerequisite: 532.

550 / 450. Design Leadership (3)

Lecture/seminar course explores the historical and contemporary relationships between political, cultural and economic theories that affect and are affected by built environments, along with the design movements and practices that result.  Prerequisite: 302 with minimum grade of "C+". Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

570. Introduction to Visualization (1)

Seminar/lab introduces issues of architectural representation with an emphasis on digital visualization, representation and modeling as it relates to design process and presentation. Offered on a CR/NC basis only,

572 / 472. Topics in Design Visualization (1-3, may be repeated six times Δ)

Topics course. Credits will vary according to content offered.

590. Historic Research Methods (3)

(Also offered as CRP 590, LA 590) An introduction to the methods for the documentation, research and analysis of historic built environments as preparation for historic preservation and contemporary regional design.

591. Introduction to Preservation and Regionalism (3)

(Also offered as CRP 591, LA 591) An introduction to the history, theory and professional practices of historic preservation and regional contemporary design and planning.

596. Project/Thesis Preparation (3-6, no limit Δ)

Foundational independent study where thesis or final project dimensions are explored, program or project principles established and search for available and manageable information completed. Feasibility of proceeding with the project is decided with faculty advisor(s). Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of Director.

597. Master's Project (6)

Development of an advanced architectural project based on research and program developed in ARCH 596. Once initiated, continuous enrollment is required (excluding summer) until project is approved by faculty committee. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 551 and 596. Restriction: permission of instructor.

599. Master's Thesis (6, no limit Δ)

Development of a research project reflective of advanced inquiry into an architectural topic. Plan I only. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 596 and (602 or 603). Restriction: permission of Director.

601. Masters Architectural Design I (6)

Studio investigates building tectonics, structure, technical documentation, sustainability and construction. The medium size designs will initiate investigations into net-zero building strategies, while developing a theoretical framework for contemporary integrated design.  Prerequisite: 502. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

602. Masters Architectural Design II (6, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio explores contemporary architectural topics. Topics will vary. At least one section will typically engage community stakeholders and may be offered in conjunction with Landscape Architecture and/or Community and Regional Planning students.  Prerequisite: 601. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

603. Masters Architectural Design III (6, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio developing an integrated design project that must be clearly resolved and highly articulated. Students must integrate building systems and content from prior coursework. Projects should demonstrate excellence in critical thinking craft, and visual presentation. Prerequisite: 602. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

604. Masters Architectural Design IV (6, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio developing an integrated design project. Projects must be clearly resolved and highly articulated. Students should integrate building systems content from prior course work. Projects should demonstrate excellence in critical thinking, craft and visual presentation.  Prerequisite: 603. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

605. Masters Architectural Design V (6, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio investigation of architectural process, practice and design in a contemporary context.  Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 604. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

619. Built Environment Teaching Colloquium (1, may be repeated once Δ)

This course presents an introduction to teaching. Through practice, observation, reading, and discussion, students gain familiarity with a range of techniques and styles of teaching. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of instructor.

621. Research Methodology (3)

Lecture/seminar studies principles and types of design research. Approaches to refining a research question and developing a research strategy will be introduced.  Prerequisite: 502. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

623. Architectural Analysis (3)

Seminar introduces the range of categories and contexts specific to the production and representation of architecture. Open only to students in the 3 1/2 year program.  Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

624 / 324. Architectural Theory (3)

This course is a survey of architectural thought in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be required to read, discuss, and write about architectural ideas, and connect them to contemporary architecture.

633 / 433. Sustainability II (3)

Explores the application of theoretical foundations of sustainability to building and landscape design including concepts of passive solar design, daylighting, water conservation, and green building materials and construction methods. Introduces environmental rating systems such as LEED. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

634. Systems Integration I (3)

Lecture course examines aesthetic stances and technical approaches to the integration of building systems. Emphasis is placed on structure, material selection and construction detailing.  Prerequisite: 533. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

635. Systems Integration II (3)

Lecture course presents a comprehensive and integrative process to examine the interrelationship of the properties of materials, building envelope, environmental systems, and construction technology, as they influence design decision making.  Prerequisite: 634. Restriction: admitted to M.Arch. Architecture.

651. Professional Practice (3)

An overview of practice including the architectural profession, licensure, and ethics; the organization and management of the professional office; contracts; and the fundamentals of project management and delivery.  Prerequisite: 602.

652. Pre-Design and Architectural Programming (3)

Seminar explores components necessary to prepare a comprehensive architectural program that includes assessing client/user needs and site conditions, determining space requirements, identifying relevant codes, standards, sustainability requirements, and estimating pre-design project costs.  Restriction: admitted to B.A.A. Architecture.

661 / 461. Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Students wishing to undertake a special study project must have instructor approval. Restriction: permission of instructor.

662 / 462. Seminar (1-3, no limit Δ)

Individually listed topics vary each semester. Restriction: permission of instructor.

665 / 465. Real Estate Development (3)

Lecture course introduces students to the process of real estate through lectures, case studies and hands-on exercises.

691. Sustainable Settlements (3)

(Also offered as CRP 691, LA 691) Urban design history, goals and theory with emphasis on cultural and ecological vibrancy. Restriction: admitted to a graduate program in the School of Architecture and Planning.

692. Urban Outcomes Analysis (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

Seminar on the definition, measurement, and prediction of urban design outcomes. Specific topics will vary. This course will be organized as three modules. Restriction: admitted to a graduate program in the School of Architecture and Planning.

694. Urban Design Methods (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

(Also offered as CRP 694, LA 694) Topics will vary but may include design of public space, streets, transit districts, tactical urbanism. This course will be organized as three modules. Restriction: admitted to a graduate program in the School of Architecture and Planning.

695. Urban Development and Regulation (1-3)

Seminar on methods for urban development and regulation. Topics vary but may include design codes, pattern books, and curatorial reports. Organized as three modules. Restriction: admitted to a graduate program in Architecture and Planning.

696. Master's Project or Thesis Documentation and Dissemination (3)

Documentation and dissemination of Master's Project or Master's Thesis.  Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 597 or 599.




Arts and Sciences (ARSC)


198. Freshman Seminar Topics (3)

Variable content in an academic discipline. Through study of topic, develops academic skills including scholarship, research, comprehension, analysis, synthesis, evaluation, application, critical thinking, and communication of ideas. Most sections require coregistration in a specified "linked" course. Restriction: freshman standing. {Fall, Spring}




Art Education (ARTE)


2214 [214]. Art in Elementary and Special Classrooms [Art in Elementary and Special Classrooms I] (3)

Understanding the art process as it relates to the growth and development of children. Experiences, methods and curriculum for art education in the elementary school. Special fee required.

305 / 505. Introduction to Art Education (3)

This is an entry-level course for licensure-track art education students and non-major students interested in exploring materials and methods, pedagogical theories, instructional practices, and professional opportunities within the visual arts.

310. Teaching Art in the Elementary School with Field Lab (4)

Philosophical, psychological, theoretical, and practical concepts about teaching art in elementary school, including observation and teaching in field-lab. Screening course requiring a minimum grade of "B-" for admission into the Art Education program.  Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in ARTH and 12 credit hours in ARTS. 

320. Teaching Art in Secondary School with Field Lab (4)

Philosophical, psychological, theoretical and practical concepts about teaching art in a secondary school, including observation and teaching in field lab. Screening course requiring a minimum grade of "B-" for admission into the Art Education program.  Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in ARTH and 12 credit hours in ARTS. 

391 / 591. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Individual problems are studied and researched under the supervision of a faculty member. Permission of faculty member involved is required. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

400. Elementary School Student Teaching in Art (4-6)

Directed and supervised student teaching in art at an elementary school and participation in a seminar concerning theory and practice relevant to elementary school art. Minimum grade of "B-" required.  A maximum of 15 hours of student teaching combined (all levels) is allowed. Prerequisite: 310 and 320. Restriction: permission of instructor.

410 / 510. Curriculum Development in Art Education (3)

Diverse art historical, philosophical, and psychological bases for theories and models of curriculum development as they apply to teaching art in a planned curriculum. Students must earn a grade of "B-" or better in this course.  Prerequisite: 310 or 320.

432 / 532. Technology in Art Education [Studio Art in Schools: Digital Arts] (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio course exploring technology in teaching elementary and secondary art. Students learn creative computer use through simple digital editing software programs. Special fee required.

433 / 533. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Printmaking for artists/teachers in school settings. Processes for elementary and secondary students including stamping, linocuts, Styrofoam cuts, collagraphs, intaglio, monotypes. Special fee required.

434 / 534. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking Advanced Secondary Level (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Advanced printmaking techniques for secondary and post-secondary levels. In-depth exploration of intaglio (solar gravuere plates) and monotype printmaking. Special fee required.

435 / 535. Studio Art in Schools: Drawing, Painting, Collage (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio experience in drawing, painting, collage for students preparing to teach art at elementary and secondary levels. Special fee required.

436 / 536. Studio Art in Schools: Textile Arts (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio experience in using textile arts, including weaving and felting, in teaching art at elementary and secondary levels. Special fee required.

437 / 537. Studio Art in Schools: Clay (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio experience in ceramic arts, including wheel-throwing and hand-building, for people preparing to teach art at elementary and secondary levels. Special fee required.

438 / 538. Studio Art in Schools: Sculpture (3)

This course merges creative practice and the exploration of modifications in sculptural materials and methods appropriate to teaching in a K-12 environment.

461. Secondary School Student Teaching in Art (5-6)

Directed and supervised student teaching in art at a secondary school and participation in a seminar concerning art teaching theory and practice. Minimum grade of "B-" required.  A maximum of 15 hours of student teaching combined (all levels) is allowed. Prerequisite: 310 and 320. Restriction: permission of instructor.

465 / 565. Art and the Exceptional Child (3)

Designed to acquaint teachers with the value and therapeutic uses of art in special education classrooms and to acquaint art education majors with adaptations of art to various exceptional cases. Special fee required.

466 / 566. Art With At-Risk Students (3)

A studio-based course in theory and practice of working with diverse students at risk for factors including socioeconomics, language, behavior, psychiatric diagnoses. Ten hours fieldwork. Special fee required.

472. Art Criticism and Aesthetics Teacher (3)

An exploration of art criticism and aesthetics as part of a comprehensive art education curriculum with practical application in a K-12 setting. Special fee required.

477 / 577. Social Justice Issues in Art Education (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Experiences for developing knowledge and competency in K-12 art curricula engaged with contemporary art and critical social issues in art education and grounded in the lives and concerns of all students in the art classroom.

493 / 593. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

Courses on a wide variety of topics about art education are offered according to interest and need. Different sections indicate different topics. Special fee required.

500. History and Philosophies of Art Education (3)

An introduction to major historical beliefs, values, philosophies and practices that inform contemporary art and art education programs and practices. Special fee required.

505 / 305. Introduction to Art Education (3)

This is an entry-level course for licensure-track art education students and non-major students interested in exploring materials and methods, pedagogical theories, instructional practices, and professional opportunities within the visual arts.

510 / 410. Curriculum Development in Art Education (3)

Diverse art historical, philosophical, and psychological bases for theories and models of curriculum development as applied to teaching art in a planned curriculum. Students must earn a grade of "B-" or better in this course.  Prerequisite: 310 or 320.

532 / 432. Technology in Art Education [Studio Art in Schools: Digital Arts] (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio course exploring technology in teaching elementary and secondary art. Students learn creative computer use through simple digital editing software programs. Special fee required.

533 / 433. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Printmaking for artists/teachers in school settings. Processes for elementary and secondary students including stamping, linocuts, Styrofoam cuts, collagraphs, intaglio, monotypes. Special fee required.

534 / 434. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking Advanced Secondary Level (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Advanced printmaking techniques for secondary and post-secondary levels. In-depth exploration of intaglio (solar gravuere plates) and monotype printmaking. Special fee required.

535 / 435. Studio Art in Schools: Drawing, Painting, Collage (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio experience in drawing, painting, collage for students preparing to teach art at elementary and secondary levels. Special fee required.

536 / 436. Studio Art in Schools: Textile Arts (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio experience in using textile arts, including weaving and felting, in teaching art at elementary and secondary levels. Special fee required.

537 / 437. Studio Art in Schools: Clay (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Studio experience in ceramic arts, including wheel-throwing and hand-building, for people preparing to teach art at elementary and secondary levels. Special fee required.

538 / 438. Studio Art in Schools: Sculpture (3)

This course merges creative practice and the exploration of modifications in sculptural materials and methods appropriate to teaching in a K-12 environment.

565 / 465. Art and the Exceptional Child (3)

Study of the special use of art activities with exceptional children along with practicum experience in field situations. Special fee required.

566 / 466. Art With At-Risk Students (3)

A studio-based course in theory and practice of working with diverse students at risk for factors including socioeconomics, language, behavior, psychiatric diagnoses. Ten hours fieldwork. Special fee required.

568. Image and Imagination in Art Education (3)

Metaphorical aspects of art, art in the construction of self and realities, and image making. Examines relationships among image and imagination, art and art education. Special fee required.

572. Art Criticism and Aesthetics for Teachers (3)

An exploration of art criticism and aesthetics as part of a comprehensive art education curriculum with practical application in a K-12 setting. Special fee required.

577 / 477. Social Justice Issues in Art Education (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Experiences for developing knowledge and competency in K-12 art curricula engaged with contemporary art and critical social issues in art education and grounded in the lives and concerns of all students in the art classroom.

585. Research Applied to Art Education (3)

Examination of the assumptions, methods, results and applications of research in art education. Special fee required.

590. Contemporary Issues in Art Education [Current Trends and Issues in Art Education] (3)

Examination of the contemporary developments, trends and issues in the field of art education as they relate to society, education and art. Special fee required.

591 / 391. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Individual research into an area in art education proposed by the student and conducted under the direction of a professor. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

593 / 493. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

Specialized courses about a particular topic in art education. A wide variety of topic courses is offered according to demand. Different sections indicate different topic content. Special fee required.

595. Advanced Field Experiences (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Individual observation, teaching, residency in an art education field situation under the supervision of a professor. Restriction: permission of instructor.

598. Directed Readings in Art Education (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of instructor.




Art History (ARTH)


1120 [101]. Introduction to Art (3)

A beginning course in the fundamental concepts of the visual arts; the language of form and the media of artistic expression. Readings and slide lectures supplemented by museum exhibition attendance. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. {Fall, Spring}

2110 [201]. History of Art I (3)

This survey course explores the art and architecture of ancient pre-historic cultures through the end of the fourteenth century. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. {Fall}

2120 [202]. History of Art II (3)

This survey course will explore the architecture, sculpture, ceramics, paintings, drawings, and glass objects from the 14th century to the modern era. While focused primarily on the art of the Western civilizations, this course will also provide insights into the works of other major cultures in order to provide alternate views of art and history. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual, and cultural movements that affect and are affected by their creation and development. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. {Spring}

2130 [250]. Modern Art (3)

This course is an overview of European and American art and architecture during the Modern era. Students will analyze the various movements in art as they relate to the historical settings in which the works were created. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of artworks to political, social, spiritual, intellectual and cultural movements as they affected and were affected by their creation and development. {Summer, Fall}

2245 [210]. History of Photography (3)

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental working knowledge of the major trends in the aesthetic, conceptual, and technical aspects of photography from its beginnings in the 1830's to the recent practices of photographers and artists working with photographic technologies. Together we will investigate photography’s role as an artistic medium as a central focus, as well as its broader role in our visual, political, and social culture. Textbook readings, online lectures, discussions boards, exams, and other activities will assist students in gaining a critical understanding of photography. {Offered upon demand}

252. Contemporary Art and New Media (3)

This course surveys the roots and evolution of what is now regarded as New Media and Contemporary Art, those pioneering new forms and technologies that often blur the boundaries between art, science, and technology.

310. Global Photographies (3)

An examination of photography from a global perspective, this course sketches the role the medium has played as an engine of globalization. The course focuses on photography from Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Oceania.

318 / 518. History of Design, 1800-1960: From the Industrial Revolution to Pop Culture (3)

The course introduces the history of modern design. Students explore the relationship between design disciplines and the fine arts. Design theories, design principles and ideas will be discussed in aesthetic, sociopolitical, and historical contexts.

321. Medieval Art 400-1100 CE: Metalwork and Manuscripts [Early Medieval Art, 500-1000 CE] (3)

Survey of the visual cultures (architecture, luxury objects, book illumination and illustration) of the Medieval World, including northern and Mediterranean Europe and the Islamic World, from 500 to 1000 CE. {Offered upon demand}

322. Medieval Art 1000-1400 CE: Reliquaries and Cathedrals [High Medieval Art, 1000-1200 CE] (3)

Survey of the visual cultures (architecture, luxury objects, book illumination and illustration) of the Medieval World, including northern and Mediterranean Europe and the Islamic World, from 1000 to 1200 CE. {Offered upon demand}

323 / 567. World Architecture I: History of the Built Environment from Prehistory to 1800 CE (3)

Lecture survey of the architectural and urban traditions of world cultures from prehistory to the Enlightenment. {Fall}

324. World Architecture II: History of the Built Environment From 1800 CE to the Present (3)

Survey of the architectural and urban traditions of the modern world from the Enlightenment to the present. {Spring}

*340. Baroque Art (3)

Painting, sculpture and architecture of the 17th-century European masters, such as Bernini, Rubens, Velasquez, Poussin and Rembrandt, are examined against their background of religious and political conflict, theoretical dispute and the rise of modern science.

351. Artistic Traditions of the Southwest (3)

Interrelationships of Native American, Hispanic and Anglo cultures from prehistoric times to the present, emphasizing the major forms of expression–pottery, textiles, jewelry, architecture, painting and photography. Slide lectures supplemented by museum exhibits. {Offered upon demand}

372 / 572 [472 / 572]. American Art: 1675-1875 (3)

Buick. Visual culture from colonial times through the Civil War including works by West, Greenough, Duncanson and Homer. Topics include various genres, artistic training and the market and art’s relationship to ethnic, gender and national identity.

379 / 579. American Art: 1876-1940 (3)

Buick. Visual culture from Reconstruction to World War II including works by Eakins, Stieglitz, Douglas and O’Keeffe. Traces the emergence of American Impressionism, early Modernism and Regionalism and explores their engagement with political, cultural and social debates.

389. Topics in Art History (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Coursework determined by specific student requests or by the professor's current research.

402 / 502. Native American Art I (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 401 / 501) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Arctic Northwest coast and the eastern woodlands of North America. {Fall}

406 / 506. Native American Art II (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 403 / 503) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Plains, Southwest and western regions of North America. {Spring}

407 / 507. Museum Practices (3)

(Also offered as MSST 407 / 507) History, philosophy and purposes of museums. Techniques and problems of museum administration, education, collection, exhibition, conservation and public relations. {Offered upon demand}

411 / 511. Pre-Columbian Art: Mesoamerica (3)

The art of Mexico and Central America prior to the 16th century. {Fall}

412 / 512. Pre-Columbian Art: South America (3)

Arts of the Andean region prior to the 16th century. {Spring}

413 / 513. Pre-Columbian Art: Central America, Northern South America and the Caribbean (3)

Contextualizes artistic traditions of Pre-Columbian Central America, northern South America and the Caribbean. Geographically occupying a critical juncture between major continents and famous empires, these cultures developed visual traditions uniquely divergent from their more well-known neighbors.

415 / 515. Modern and Contemporary Native American Art (3)

Late 19th century through the present, includes painting and photography as well as media more often termed traditional. Examines historical background and current critical issues including the impact of stereotypes and the marketplace. {Offered periodically}

416 / 516. Southwestern Native Ceramics (3)

Szabo This course examines Native Southwestern ceramics from the archaeological past to the present. Regional developments, changes in ceramics made for internal use and for outside sale, as well as issues of the contemporary market are investigated. {Offered periodically}

417 / 517. Seminar in Souvenir Native American Arts (3)

Long undervalued, Native arts made for outside sale provide multi-voiced narratives. Seminar-format will examine the intrinsic, aesthetic value of these complex arts, their roles and their importance to creators, purchasers and various audiences.

420 / 520. History of Prints I (3)

History of European prints from its inception in the early 15th century to its technical perfection and market success in the 18th century. Presenting printmaking as an expression of artistic and intellectual pursuit.

421 / 521. History of Prints II (3)

Printmaking, printing and artists’ books from Goya to present. Including the graphic arts and photography, the rise of the ideas of the original print, 20th-century mixed media and the relationship between words and images. {Spring}

425 / 525. 19th-Century Photography (3)

An in-depth study of historical, critical, and theoretical issues in American and European photographic visual culture from its inception to approximately 1914. {Offered upon demand}

426 / 526. 20th-Century Photography (3)

An in-depth study of historical, critical, and theoretical issues in American and European photographic visual culture from 1914 to approximately 1980. {Offered upon demand}

427 / 527. Contemporary Photography (3)

An in-depth study of recent photographic visual culture, from approximately 1980 to the present. Emphasis on how images are deployed and understood as efforts to explore artistic, cultural, political, social, and theoretical issues. {Offered upon demand}

429. Topics in Art History (1-3, no limit Δ)

Course work determined by specific students’ request or by the professor’s current research. {Offered upon demand}

431 / 531. Byzantine Art and Architecture (3)

This course will explore the worship and display of art and architecture from the Byzantine Empire with a specific emphasis on the cross-cultural connections among Byzantium, Medieval Europe, the Islamic world, and the Armenian Kingdom.

432 / 532. Islamic Art and Architecture (3)

An introduction to the visual culture of the Islamic world from its foundations in the seventh century on the Arabian Peninsula to its flowering under Ottoman and Mughal rule in the seventeenth century.

449 / 549. Art of Spain (3)

Survey of Spanish art and civilization. {Offered upon demand}

450 / 550. Ibero-American Colonial Arts and Architecture (3)

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the period of Spanish colonization and the relation of these art forms to both the Spanish and the native Indian traditions. {Offered upon demand}

453 / 553. African American Art (3)

(Also offered as AFST 453) Buick. This class provides an overview of African American artists and contextualizes their creativity within the wider framework of U.S. art. What, for example, are the benefits and pitfalls of assigning race to any creative practice?

464 / 564. European Art 1750-1830 (3)

Painting, sculpture and architecture in France, England, Spain and Germany from the twilight of Absolutism through the Industrial and French Revolutions.

481 / 595. European Art 1830-1900 (3)

Painting and sculpture in France, England and Germany from Courbet’s Realism and the Victorian Pre-Raphaelites through Impressionism and the late works of Cezanne and Monet.

485 / 585. Seminar in Museum Methods (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH, MSST 485 / 585) Theoretical and practical work in specific museum problems. May be repeated as subject matter changes. Prerequisite: 407 or MSST 407. {Offered upon demand}

486 / 586. Practicum: Museum Methods (1-3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH, MSST 486 / 586) Practicum in museum methods and management. Prerequisite: 407 or MSST 407. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

487 / 587. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as DANC, MUS, THEA 487 / 587; FDMA *487) Analyzes major instances of interdisciplinary influence and collaboration in the present day. Restriction: permission of instructor.

490. Muralism in the Americas- 19th and 20th Centuries and Beyond (3)

Murals are an ancient and global phenomenon. This course studies the multiplicity of forms, topics, issues, contexts, aesthetic programs, and effects associated with those murals painted throughout the Americas from the 19th century to the present. {Offered upon demand}

491 / 591. Late 20th-Century to 21st-Century Art (3)

Painting and sculpture, 1940 to the present. Prerequisite: 2130.

492 / 592. American Landscapes (3)

Buick The class provides an examination of how densely populated American environments were reinterpreted by Europeans upon contact in the process of designing and implementing various systems for their habitation, exploitation, and consumption.

496. Undergraduate Tutorial (3, no limit Δ)

Individual investigation or reading under faculty direction. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

498. Art History Capstone (0)

Art History Capstone course allows the student to demonstrate skill at art historical research and writing. Students work with professors, producing a final paper articulating the results of their findings, correctly revised and edited. Prerequisite: one 400-level ARTH course. Restriction: permission of instructor and senior standing. 

499. Honors Thesis (3-6)

Directed independent study in a field of special interest culminating in a written thesis. Open only by invitation to departmental honors candidates. {Fall, Spring}

500. Philosophy and Methods of Art History (3)

A seminar for graduate students in art history stressing the history of the discipline and the methodology of research. Open to graduate students in art history. Restriction for others: permission of instructor. {Fall}

502 / 402. Native American Art I (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 501 / 401) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Arctic Northwest coast and the eastern woodlands of North America. {Fall}

506 / 406. Native American Art II (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 503 / 403) Archaeological and historic art forms of the Plains, Southwest and western regions of North America. {Spring}

507 / 407. Museum Practices (3)

(Also offered as MSST 507 / 407) History, philosophy and purposes of museums. Techniques and problems of museum administration, education, collection, exhibition, conservation and public relations. {Offered every academic year}

511 / 411. Pre-Columbian Art: Mesoamerica (3)

The art of Mexico and Central America prior to the 16th century. {Fall}

512 / 412. Pre-Columbian Art: South America (3)

Arts of the Andean region prior to the 16th century. {Spring}

513 / 413. Pre-Columbian Art: Central America, Northern South America and the Caribbean (3)

Contextualizes artistic traditions of Pre-Columbian Central America, northern South America and the Caribbean. Geographically occupying a critical juncture between major continents and famous empires, these cultures developed visual traditions uniquely divergent from their more well-known neighbors.

515 / 415. Modern and Contemporary Native American Art (3)

Late 19th century through the present, includes painting and photography as well as media more often termed traditional. Examines historical background and current critical issues including the impact of stereotypes and the marketplace. {Offered periodically}

516 / 416. Southwestern Native Ceramics (3)

Szabo This course examines Native Southwestern ceramics from the archaeological past to the present. Regional developments, changes in ceramics made for internal use and for outside sale, as well as issues of the contemporary market are investigated. {Offered periodically}

517 / 417. Seminar in Souvenir Native American Arts (3)

Long undervalued, Native arts made for outside sale provide multi-voiced narratives. Seminar-format will examine the intrinsic, aesthetic value of these complex arts, their roles and their importance to creators, purchasers and various audiences.

518 / 318. History of Design, 1800-1960: From the Industrial Revolution to Pop Culture (3)

The course introduces the history of modern design. Students explore the relationship between design disciplines and the fine arts. Design theories, design principles and ideas will be discussed in aesthetic, sociopolitical, and historical contexts.

520 / 420. History of Prints I (3)

History of European prints from its inception in the early 15th century to its technical perfection and market success in the 18th century. Presenting printmaking as an expression of artistic and intellectual pursuit.

521 / 421. History of Prints II (3)

Printmaking, printing and artists’ books from Goya to present. Including the graphic arts and photography, the rise of the ideas of the original print, 20th-century mixed media and the relationship between words and images. {Spring}

525 / 425. 19th-Century Photography (3)

An in-depth study of historical, critical, and theoretical issues in American and European photographic visual culture from its inception to approximately 1914. {Offered upon demand}

526 / 426. 20th-Century Photography (3)

An in-depth study of historical, critical, and theoretical issues in American and European photographic visual culture from 1914 to approximately 1980. {Offered upon demand}

527 / 427. Contemporary Photography (3)

An in-depth study of recent photographic visual culture, from approximately 1980 to the present. Emphasis on how images are deployed and understood as efforts to explore artistic, cultural, political, social, and theoretical issues. {Offered upon demand}

529. Topics in Art History (1-3, no limit Δ)

{Offered upon demand}

531 / 431. Byzantine Art and Architecture (3)

This course will explore the worship and display of art and architecture from the Byzantine Empire with a specific emphasis on the cross-cultural connections among Byzantium, Medieval Europe, the Islamic world, and the Armenian Kingdom.

532 / 432. Islamic Art and Architecture (3)

An introduction to the visual culture of the Islamic world from its foundations in the seventh century on the Arabian Peninsula to its flowering under Ottoman and Mughal rule in the seventeenth century.

549 / 449. Art of Spain (3)

Survey of Spanish art and civilization. {Offered upon demand}

550 / 450. Ibero-American Colonial Arts and Architecture (3)

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the period of Spanish colonization and the relation of these art forms to both the Spanish and the native Indian traditions. {Offered upon demand}

551 / 552. Problems (2-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

{Fall, Spring}

553 / 453. African American Art (3)

Buick This class provides an overview of African American artists and contextualizes their creativity within the wider framework of U.S. art. What, for example, are the benefits and pitfalls of assigning race to any creative practice?

559. Seminar in Native American Art (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH 509) Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

560. Seminar in Pre-Columbian Art (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Aspects of Pre-Columbian art, architecture, and culture in Mesoamerica and South America are examined in depth. Prerequisite: 511 and 512. {Offered upon demand}

564 / 464. European Art 1750-1830 (3)

Painting, sculpture and architecture in France, England, Spain and Germany from the twilight of Absolutism through the Industrial and French Revolutions.

567 / 323. World Architecture I: History of the Built Environment From Prehistory to 1800 CE (3)

(Also offered as ARCH 523) Lecture survey of the architectural and urban traditions of world cultures from prehistory to the Enlightenment. {Fall}

572 / 372 [572 / 472]. American Art: 1675-1875 (3)

Buick. Visual culture from colonial times through the Civil War including works by West, Greenough, Duncanson and Homer. Topics include various genres, artistic training and the market and art’s relationship to ethnic, gender and national identity.

579 / 379. American Art: 1876-1940 (3)

Buick. Visual culture from Reconstruction to World War II including works by Eakins, Stieglitz, Douglas and O’Keeffe. Traces the emergence of American Impressionism, early Modernism and Regionalism and explores their engagement with political, cultural and social debates.

580. Seminar in Spanish Colonial Art (3, no limit Δ)

Prerequisite: 450. {Offered upon demand}

582. Seminar in 20th-Century Art (3, no limit Δ)

Prerequisite: 491. {Offered upon demand}

583. Seminar in Modern/Contemporary Latin American Art History (3, no limit Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

584. Problems in Interdisciplinary Studies (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as FDMA *485; MUS 584)  An independent study in either critical studies or studio, beyond the scope of the Fine Arts interdisciplinary courses, which may occur within or outside the College of Fine Arts. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

585 / 485. Seminar in Museum Methods (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH, MSST 585 / 485) Theoretical and practical work in specific museum problems. May be repeated as subject matter changes. Prerequisite: 507 or MSST 507. {Offered upon demand}

586 / 486. Practicum: Museum Methods (1-3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH, MSST 586 / 486) Practicum in museum methods and management. Prerequisite: 507 or MSST 507. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

587 / 487. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as DANC, MUS, THEA 587 / 487; FDMA *487) Analyzes major instances of interdisciplinary influence and collaboration in the present day. {Spring}

591 / 491. Late 20th-Century to 21st-Century Art (3)

Painting and sculpture, 1940 to the present. Prerequisite: 2130.

592 / 492. American Landscapes (3)

Buick The class provides an examination of how densely populated American environments were reinterpreted by Europeans upon contact in the process of designing and implementing various systems for their habitation, exploitation, and consumption.

595 / 481. European Art 1830-1900 (3)

Painting and sculpture in France, England and Germany from Courbet’s Realism and the Victorian Pre-Raphaelites through Impressionism and the late works of Cezanne and Monet.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}




Art Studio (ARTS)


1220 [125]. Art Practices I (3)

This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of LIGHT, FRAME, and MARK while developing an understanding of the elements and principles of design. {Fall, Spring}

1230 [126]. Art Practices II (3)

This course introduces the exploration of processes, ideas, and diverse media of visual arts. It addresses the thematic concepts that are central to the nature of art making today, with emphasis given to issues of MOTIVE and CHANGE while developing concepts, techniques, and processes involved in working in the third dimension. Prerequisite: 1220. {Fall, Spring}

1240 [121]. Design I [Two-dimensional Design] (3)

This course introduces the fundamentals of two-dimensional design as it applies to fine art and commercial contexts. Emphasis will be on basic color theory, elements of dynamic composition, vocabulary of visual arts and design, and development of visual conceptual skills. Students will use a variety of materials and techniques. {Fall, Spring}

1310 [168]. Introduction to Ceramics (3)

This course introduces the technical processes and conceptual concerns of working with ceramic material. Various methods of forming functional and expressive works out of clay are explored. Methods used include handbuilding and throwing, basic clay bodies, slip and glaze, and atmospheric firing. {Fall, Spring}

1320 [268]. Ceramics I [Ceramics: Materials and Aesthetics] (3)

An introduction to the medium of clay incorporating hand building and wheel throwing to introduce the student to both the sculptural and utilitarian uses of clay. The student will also be introduced to a variety of glazing and firing techniques. Prerequisite: 1310. {Fall, Spring}

141. Introduction to Art and Ecology (3)

This course introduces the student to three basic skills of an ecological art practice: research, making, and an immersion in ecological systems through poetic thinking, subversive action, and creative fabrication. {Fall, Spring}

1410 [187]. Introduction to Photography (3)

This course introduces the making of photographic images from a broad viewpoint to consider both as an art practice and as a cultural practice. The course covers technical information on camera use and functionality, composition and visual design, digital workflow and editing, professional functions of manipulating and enhancing images, and printing correctly and effectively. The historical aspects of photography are also covered. Foundation course designed to prepare students for ARTS 2420. {Fall, Spring}

1510 [130]. Introduction to Electronic Arts [Introduction to Electronic Art] (3)

This course will be an introduction to the computer as a medium and fine art tool. The course will explore the history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with electronic art practice, as well as introduce students to the basic tools and associated technologies. This studio course will introduce simple electronics, software and ideas for working with sound, video, and the Internet to create artwork. {Fall, Spring}

1610 [106]. Drawing I (3)

This course introduces the basic principles, materials, and skills of observational drawing. Emphasis is placed on rendering a 3-D subject on a 2-D surface with visual accuracy. Other topics include historical and contemporary references as well as an investigation of linear perspective, line, value, shape, space & composition. {Fall, Spring}

1630 [207]. Painting I (3)

This course introduces the tradition of painting as a medium for artistic expression. Students will investigate materials, tools, techniques, history and concepts of painting. Emphasis is placed on developing descriptive and perceptual skills, color theory, and composition. Prerequisite: 1610. {Fall, Spring}

1710 [274]. Introduction to Printmaking (3)

This course provides direct experience of exploring basic printmaking processes, including relief, intaglio, and monoprint processes, as well as the investigation of materials/media, tools, techniques, history, and concepts of printmaking. Emphasis is given to solving problems through thematic development while producing a portfolio of prints. Prerequisite: 1610. {Fall, Spring}

1810 [157]. Jewelry and Small Metal Construction I [Small Scale Metal Construction I] (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course introduces the basic techniques, materials, and tools traditionally used in the creation of jewelry and/or small-scale sculptural objects. {Fall, Spring}

1830 [123]. Shop Foundation [Shop Foundations] (2)

This course provides an introduction to the proper use of shop facilities with an emphasis on the safety procedures required for their proper use. The course will provide the student with a foundation of technical skills for use in the production of their work in subsequent classes. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}

1840 [213]. Sculpture I (3)

This course introduces the student to a variety of medium and techniques used in the production of sculpture; along with the historic, conceptual, and esthetic foundations of the sculptural process. Prerequisite: 1830. {Fall, Spring}

2410 [287]. Black and White Photography (3)

This course introduces the fundamental techniques of black and white photography, which includes camera functions and use, exposure techniques and film processing, traditional darkroom printing, and presentation of work. {Offered upon demand}

2413. Black and White Photography II (3)

Students will create work that deeply explores analog image creation from rigorous traditional image making to highly experimental engagement with light sensitive materials. While technique is emphasized, conceptual engagement with that technique is paramount. Prerequisite: 2410.

2420 [188]. Visualizing Ideas [Visualizing Ideas Using Photography] (3)

The course is dedicated to teaching how to visualize ideas within the photographic medium by combining theoretical content and aesthetic form to create a conceptually rich body of work. It explores advanced digital photography, including perfecting use of the camera and relevant digital software, and honing inkjet printing skills. We will explore new techniques and workflows, and use them to respond to a variety of themes and concerns. We will look at a number of contemporary photographic practitioners, and discuss a multitude of historical and contemporary approaches to the same ideas we will be probing. Prerequisite: 1410.

2522 [289]. Digital Imaging Techniques (3)

Techniques and aesthetics of digital imaging using a variety of software programs and hardware. Prerequisite: 2420. {Offered upon demand}

2523 [231]. Video Art I (3)

An investigation of video as a medium within a fine art context. Course will explore history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with video art practice as well as develop student's mastery of technical skills. Prerequisite: 1510.

2610 [205]. Drawing II (3)

This course introduces color and colored media as an element of composition while emphasizing descriptive and perceptual drawing skills and conceptual approaches to contemporary drawing. Prerequisite: 1610. {Fall, Spring}

2630 [208]. Painting II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course focuses on the expressive and conceptual aspects of painting, building on the observational, compositional, technical, and critical skills gained previously. Students will investigate a variety of approaches to subject matter, materials, and creative processes through in-class projects, related out-of-class assignments, library research or museum/gallery attendance, written responses, and critiques. Prerequisite: 1630. {Fall, Spring}

2810 [257]. Jewelry and Small Metal Construction II [Small Scale Metal Construction II] (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Fabrication skills are further developed and refined while additional advanced fabrication methods are introduced. Emphasis is placed on developing a deeper understanding of form and content as it relates to creating on an intimate scale. Prerequisite: 1810. {Fall, Spring}

2892 [232]. Sound Art I (3)

An investigation of sound as a medium within a fine art context. Course will explore history, theory, and contemporary art issues associated with sound art and develop student's skills in sound editing/recording technology. Prerequisite: 1510.

305. Drawing III (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Continued exploration of drawing concepts and techniques presented in prerequisite. Emphasis on expressive drawing, working from imagination as well as from observation. Prerequisite: 2610. {Fall, Spring}

308. Painting III (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Extension of the concepts presented in prerequisite, emphasizing experimentation with materials and techniques. Individual in-depth projects are assigned to encourage independent thinking with regard to contemporary painting issues. Prerequisite: 2630. {Fall, Spring}

310. Figure Drawing (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Study of the human figure as the primary vehicle for addressing formal and conceptual drawing problems. Prerequisite: 2610.

313. Intermediate Sculpture (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This class encourages the student to develop personal direction with an emphasis on expanding sculptural possibilities. Topically appropriate assignments will be given according to the instructor’s individual expertise as well as the current theoretical discourse. Prerequisite: 1840. {Fall, Spring}

320. The Phenomena of Color (3, may be repeated once Δ)

An intensive study of color through assigned problems designed to develop greater awareness of and sensitivity to the use and function of color in the arts.

330. Intermediate Electronic Art (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Course emphasizes art making using evolving computer based tools. Class draws on current work and theory, combined with classroom critique. Students must have a basic understanding of video and digital imaging techniques to take course. {Fall, Spring}

331. Video Art II (3)

This intermediate course advances techniques and conceptual foundations learned in Video Art I. Through technical demonstrations and assignments, students develop their video work while investigating a variety of formats and presentations in video art. Prerequisite: 1510.

333. Introduction to 3D Printing (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Course serves as an introduction to using the 3D printer as a tool for creating artwork. Students gain technical understanding of fused filament fabrication 3D printers with focus on creating artwork and troubleshooting design issues. Prerequisite: 1510.

337. Intaglio Printmaking I (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Exploration of intaglio processes. Includes lecture, demonstration, studio practice, and critique. Emphasis on technical considerations and the development of a personal aesthetic.  Prerequisite: 1710. {Fall, Spring}

338. Lithography Printmaking (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Fundamental techniques of drawing and painting on and from lithographic stones and metal plates, primarily in black and white. Includes lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and practical experience.  Prerequisite: 1710. {Fall, Spring}

341. Intermediate Studio in Art and Ecology (3)

This course builds on the ecological practice of art, emphasizing background research, collaboration, and public interaction. Prerequisite: 141. {Fall, Spring}

345. Serigraphy (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Introduction to techniques, history, aesthetics and creative aspects of screen printing. Prerequisite: 1710. {Offered upon demand}

357. Small Scale Casting (3, may be repeated once Δ)

De Jong. Introduction to the fundamentals of small scale metal casting in bronze and silver through the lost wax process. Additional metal related techniques such as soldering and patination will be explored. Prerequisite: 1810.

367. Advanced Ceramics: Professional Practices Studio Arts Intensive I (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Encourages personal interest in making art while gaining understanding of traditions, innovations, concepts, history, techniques, critical thinking, material sensibility, and community engagements that underline international ceramics practice. Open-ended projects and self-directed work. Prerequisite: 1320. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

370. Arita Porcelain Vessels (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Arita, Japan method of creating wheel thrown porcelain vessels: processes, materials, history, and philosophy. {Fall, Spring}

386 / 586. The Exhibition Print (3)

Focusing on all aspects of digital workflow, this course is for students with advanced digital imaging skills to further hone and perfect the processes of advanced photographic manipulation and the creation of exhibition-quality prints. Prerequisite: 2420 and (ARTH 2245 or ARTH 425 or ARTH 426 or ARTH 427).

387. Intermediate Photography (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Salinger, Stone. Students will begin to develop their own work based on individual interests and contemporary issues, in-class critiques, and readings. Prerequisite: 2420 and (ARTH 2245 or ARTH 425 or ARTH 426 or ARTH 427). {Offered upon demand}

388 / 588 [388]. Photographic Lighting (3)

Students work toward a complete understanding of the qualities of light, both natural and artificial, on photographs. Intensive studio practice explores the use of artificial light. Prerequisite: 2420 and (ARTH 2245 or ARTH 425 or ARTH 426 or ARTH 427).

389. Topics in Studio Art (1-3, no limit Δ)

Concentrated practical and historical study of specified concerns in studio art. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

394. Computer Generated Imagery and Animation (3)

(Also offered as CS 394) Introduction to story boarding, modeling, rendering, animation and dynamics. Class uses high-level commercial animation software. Course emphasizes both the development of technical skills and the aesthetic aspects of computer imagery. Not allowed for graduate credit for computer science majors, nor as a technical elective for undergraduate computer science majors.

405. Advanced Drawing (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Emphasis on contemporary drawing issues. Students are encouraged to initiate their own projects and to develop a personal direction. Individual and group critiques. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Prerequisite: 305. {Fall, Spring}

407. Advanced Painting (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Emphasizes contemporary painting issues. Students are encouraged to initiate their own projects and to develop a personal direction. Individual and group critiques. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Prerequisite: 308. {Fall, Spring}

408. Outdoor Studio (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)

This is a nature based, field study class. Sites are visited which inspire artists to develop projects with an interrelated media approach. Formal and conceptual issues regarding several environments will be addressed. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula and majors in Art enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

413. Advanced Sculpture (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Allows students to pursue their own individual concepts and techniques. Emphasis will be on independent projects. Prerequisite: 1840. {Fall, Spring}

417. Advanced Painting and Drawing Studio (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Focuses on issues important to the theory and practice of contemporary painting and drawing. Class time will include open studio hours, seminar style discussions, and group critiques. Prerequisite: two semesters of 305 and/or 308. Restriction: permission of instructor.

429. Undergraduate Topics in Studio Art (1-6 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

Coursework determined by specific student need or by the professor’s current research. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

431 / 531. Advanced Time-Based Media (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Explores advanced technical, theoretical and conceptual essentials of time-based media. Designed for students with continued interest in using sound, moving images, and performance for their art-making practice. Challenges students to create novel time-based work. Prerequisite: 331.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

432 / 532. Special Projects in Electronic Art I (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Course is based on the integration of nascent technologies in electronic / digital media art practice. Works will be created in conjunction with concurrent investigation of digital media art history and contemporary theoretical discourses. Part I. Restriction: permission of instructor.

433 / 533. Special Projects in Electronic Art II (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Course is based on integration of nascent technologies in electronic / digital media art practice. Works will be created in conjunction with concurrent investigation of digital media, art history, and contemporary theoretical discourses. Part II. Restriction: permission of instructor.

434 / 534. Immersive Media (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Fine Art production for the Immersive Fulldome. This emerging medium comes out of planetarium technology. We will investigate the nature of immersive media through historical and theoretical readings and discussions alongside the creative process. Prerequisite: 330.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

435 / 535. The Art of Transmission (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This class will focus on network and wireless, communication and control technologies. Students will experiment with streaming and analog broadcasting as well as installation based approaches to working with tools that manipulate the electromagnetic spectrum. Prerequisite: 330.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

437. Intaglio Printmaking II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

A continuation of 337 with the exploration of multiple plate and color printing processes. Greater emphasis is given to technical considerations and the development of a personal aesthetic.  Prerequisite: 337. {Fall, Spring}

438. Advanced Lithography (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Continuation of 338 with particular emphasis on color printing and special processes, including photo reproduction. Emphasis on personal aesthetic and technical concepts. Prerequisite: 338. {Fall, Spring}

440 / 540. Art and Ecology: Grant and Proposal Writing (3)

This course focuses on skills for researching, designing and writing effective grant applications and proposals for art-based solicitations. Students shape ideas for small and large-scale projects into proposals following requirements of real-world calls for entry.

441 / 541. Art and Ecology: Computational Sustainability (3)

An interdisciplinary field course in aesthetically visualizing information from computer science, operations research, and applied mathematics to articulate environmental, economic, and societal needs for sustainability. Hands-on projects, theoretical, and field research. {Offered periodically}

442 / 542. Art and Ecology: Sculptural Infrastructure (3)

This course will investigate site-based, low-tech, infrastructure as art. We will design and build experimental sculptures to create an aesthetic for functional works and understand challenges to scaling. {Offered periodically}

444 / 544. Art and Ecology: Creating Change (3, may be repeated once Δ)

The course uses art and design to respond to global and local challenges. Modules led by faculty from Art and Ecology offer students skills of collaboration, community process, site-based plans of action, and economic value.

445 / 545. Text and Image: Graphic Design for Artists (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Course addresses fundamentals of graphic design through a series of art projects. Students study examples from a variety of sources and develop language for using text and image in installation, print, and online publication.

446 / 546. The Politics of Performance (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Course explores the politics of performance and how artists investigate constructions of race, gender, sexuality, and class. Combines seminar discussion with group workshop and critique sessions. Students develop performance pieces or critical scholarship.

451 / 551. Land Arts of the American West: Research (3)

This course will investigate research methodologies for field-based artists and facilitate the development and implementation of students' individualized artistic research projects through primary source materials, creative processes, critical reflection, and textual production. Corequisite: 452 and 453 and 454. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

452 / 552. Land Arts of the American West: Field Investigations (3)

This course will immerse students in field-based studio practice across numerous econiches, habitation sites, and conceptions of "Place." Students will work individually and collaboratively to investigate these field sites through artistic processes and projects. Corequisite: 451 and 453 and 454. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

453 / 553. Land Arts of the American West: Creative Production (3)

This course will engage and transform field-based, artistic research and practice into the production process of interdisciplinary studio art projects culminating in both experimental and finished art works. Corequisite: 451 and 452 and 454. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

454 / 554. Land Arts of the American West: Presentation and Dissemination (3)

This course will investigate the context of art through various presentation methodologies, engagement locations, consideration for audience reception, and media dissemination. Students will develop presentation strategies and work collaboratively to prepare a public exhibition. Corequisite: 451 and 452 and 453. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

457. Advanced Casting and Construction (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

DeJong. Students must develop an individual program of studies in consultation with the instructor. Group critiques are scheduled regularly. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula and majors in Art enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Prerequisite: 357. {Spring}

458 / 558. Nature and Technology (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Cook. This course addresses what constitutes authentic experience in an era profoundly shaped by electronic media. Travel to locations in New Mexico where work is produced on site with digital video and other imaging tools. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

469 / 569. Pueblo Pottery (3)

A cross-cultural approach designed to expose students to the Puebloan pottery tradition. The course combines a hands-on approach to pottery-making with an analytical investigation of material culture and ethnoaesthetics.  Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

470 / 570. Advanced Arita Porcelain Vessels (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

In-depth practices of the Arita, Japan method of creating wheel thrown porcelain vessels: forming techniques, aesthetics, surface design, glazing, and firing.  Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

474. Advanced Printmaking (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Concentrated exploration of various concepts and methods of printmaking including multiple processes. Course content varies but emphasizes the development of personalized direction and the establishment of high professional standards. Individual and group critiques. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula and majors in Art enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Prerequisite: 336 or 374.

487. Advanced Photography [Advanced Interdisciplinary Portfolio] (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Salinger, Stone. Emphasis on photo-based media, but open to advanced students in all areas of studio art. Will encourage cross-media critique and help students prepare for the professional world upon graduation. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

495. Independent Study (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Advanced, individually directed study in areas of special interest not normally covered in advanced level courses. Open only to undergraduates enrolled in the Pre-professional curricula of the College of Fine Arts. Students in Art Education curricula may enroll with permission of the department chairperson. Restriction: permission of department.

498. Senior Seminar: Art Studio Capstone (3 [2])

Art Studio Capstone will focus on preparing B.F.A. seniors on topics pertaining to professional practices and critical discourse for visual artists. Students will learn to present their work verbally and visually in a professional manner. Restriction: permission of instructor.

499. Honors Thesis (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Directed independent study in a field of special interest, culminating in an exhibition and written thesis. Open only by invitation to departmental honors candidates. May be repeated for credit towards degree to a maximum of 6 hours. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}

502. Interdisciplinary Seminar (3)

Study of relationships between theory and practice. Course examines contemporary theories of art as viewed in the context of the student’s own work. Open only to studio graduate students in the Department of Art and Art History. {Fall}

505. Graduate Drawing and Painting (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

508. Graduate Outdoor Studio (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)

This is a nature based, field study class. Sites are visited which inspire artists to develop projects with an interrelated media approach. Formal and conceptual issues regarding several environments will be addressed. {Fall}

513. Graduate Sculpture (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Student is required to produce four projects, an artist’s statement, a portfolio of the semester’s work and give a slide lecture on a contemporary topic. {Fall, Spring}

520. Graduate Phenomena of Color (3)

Production of finished works based upon current research and studio practice incorporating concepts such as one color as two, two color as one, transparency/illusion, saturation/shadow, descriptive/local color, optical mixtures, unity, anomaly, psychological color, electronic color.

529. Graduate Topics in Studio Art (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Course work determined by specific student need or by the professor's current research. {Fall, Spring}

531 / 431. Advanced Time-Based Media (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Explores advanced technical, theoretical and conceptual essentials of time-based media. Designed for students with continued interest in using sound, moving images, and performance for their art-making practice. Challenges students to create novel time-based work. Prerequisite: 331.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

532 / 432. Special Projects in Electronic Art I (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Course is based on the integration of nascent technologies in electronic / digital media art practice. Works will be created in conjunction with concurrent investigation of digital media art history and contemporary theoretical discourses. Part I. Restriction: permission of instructor.

533 / 433. Special Projects in Electronic Art II (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Course is based on integration of nascent technologies in electronic / digital media art practice. Works will be created in conjunction with concurrent investigation of digital media, art history, and contemporary theoretical discourses. Part II. Restriction: permission of instructor.

534 / 434. Immersive Media (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Fine Art production for the Immersive Fulldome. This emerging medium comes out of planetarium technology. We will investigate the nature of immersive media through historical and theoretical readings and discussions alongside the creative process. Prerequisite: 330.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

535 / 435. The Art of Transmission (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This class will focus on network and wireless, communication and control technologies. Students will experiment with streaming and analog broadcasting as well as installation based approaches to working with tools that manipulate the electromagnetic spectrum. Prerequisite: 330.  Restriction: permission of instructor.

540 / 440. Art and Ecology: Grant and Proposal Writing (3)

This course focuses on skills for researching, designing and writing effective grant applications and proposals for art-based solicitations. Students shape ideas for small and large-scale projects into proposals following requirements of real-world calls for entry.

541 / 441. Art and Ecology: Computational Sustainability (3)

An interdisciplinary field course in aesthetically visualizing information from computer science, operations research, and applied mathematics to articulate environmental, economic, and societal needs for sustainability. Hands-on projects, theoretical, and field research. {Offered periodically}

542 / 442. Art and Ecology: Sculptural Infrastructure (3)

This course will investigate site-based, low-tech, infrastructure as art. We will design and build experimental sculptures to create an aesthetic for functional works and understand challenges to scaling. {Offered periodically}

544 / 444. Art and Ecology: Creating Change (3, may be repeated once Δ)

The course uses art and design to respond to global and local challenges. Modules led by faculty from Art and Ecology offer students skills of collaboration, community process, site-based plans of action, and economic value.

545 / 445. Text and Image: Graphic Design for Artists (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Course addresses fundamentals of graphic design through a series of art projects. Students study examples from a variety of sources and develop language for using text and image in installation, print, and online publication.

546 / 446. The Politics of Performance (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Course explores the politics of performance and how artists investigate constructions of race, gender, sexuality, and class. Combines seminar discussion with group workshop and critique sessions. Students develop performance pieces or critical scholarship.

551 / 451. Land Arts of the American West: Research (3)

This course will investigate research methodologies for field-based artists and facilitate the development and implementation of students' individualized artistic research projects through primary source materials, creative processes, critical reflection, and textual production. Corequisite: 552 and 553 and 554. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

552 / 452. Land Arts of the American West: Field Investigations (3)

This course will immerse students in field-based studio practice across numerous econiches, habitation sites, and conceptions of "Place." Students will work individually and collaboratively to investigate these field sites through artistic processes and projects. Corequisite: 551 and 553 and 554. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

553 / 453. Land Arts of the American West: Creative Production (3)

This course will engage and transform field-based, artistic research and practice into the production process of interdisciplinary studio art projects culminating in both experimental and finished art works. Corequisite: 551 and 552 and 554. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

554 / 454. Land Arts of the American West: Presentation and Dissemination (3)

This course will investigate the context of art through various presentation methodologies, engagement locations, consideration for audience reception, and media dissemination. Students will develop presentation strategies and work collaboratively to prepare a public exhibition. Corequisite: 551 and 552 and 553. Restriction: permission of instructor. 

557. Graduate Casting and Construction (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Small scale metal casting in bronze and silver through the lost wax process. Included are additional metal related techniques such as soldering and patination. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

558 / 458. Nature and Technology (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Cook. This course addresses what constitutes authentic experience in an era profoundly shaped by electronic media. Travel to locations in New Mexico where work is produced on site with digital video and other imaging tools. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

569 / 469. Pueblo Pottery (3)

A cross-cultural approach designed to expose students to the Puebloan pottery tradition. The course combines a hands-on approach to pottery-making with an analytical investigation of material culture and ethnoaesthetics.  Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

570 / 470. Advanced Arita Porcelain Vessels (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

In-depth practices of the Arita, Japan method of creating wheel thrown porcelain vessels: forming techniques, aesthetics, surface design, glazing, and firing. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

574. Graduate Printmaking (3, may be repeated four times Δ)



586 / 386. The Exhibition Print (3)

Focusing on all aspects of digital workflow, this course is for students with advanced digital imaging skills to further hone and perfect the processes of advanced photographic manipulation and the creation of exhibition-quality prints. Prerequisite: 2420 and (ARTH 2245 or ARTH 525 or ARTH 526 or ARTH 527).

587. Graduate Visual Art Seminar (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Concentration on student’s individual art production in any area of studio art, with special attention given to developing critical acuity toward photo-based media. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

588 / 388. Photographic Lighting (3)

Students work toward a complete understanding of the qualities of light, both natural and artificial, on photographs. Intensive studio practice explores the use of artificial light. Prerequisite: 2420 and (ARTH 2245 or ARTH 525 or ARTH 526 or ARTH 527).

593. Seminar in Studio Art (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Consideration of theoretical, critical and historical issues in the context of studio disciplines. Course content determined by student request or professor’s current research. {Fall, Spring}

595. Graduate Tutorial (1-9 to a maximum of 21 Δ)

Advanced, individually directed study. Open to graduate students only. {Fall, Spring}

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Fall, Spring}




Arts and Sciences Cooperative Education Program (ASCP)


105. Arts and Sciences Co-op Work Phase (0, may be repeated four times)

A mechanism for registered work phase students from the College of Arts and Sciences as full-time students while working. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Astronomy (ASTR)


1115 [101]. Introduction to Astronomy (3)

This course surveys observations, theories, and methods of modern astronomy. The course is predominantly for non-science majors, aiming to provide a conceptual understanding of the universe and the basic physics that governs it. Due to the broad coverage of this course, the specific topics and concepts treated may vary. Commonly presented subjects include the general movements of the sky and history of astronomy, followed by an introduction to basic physics concepts like Newton’s and Kepler’s laws of motion. The course may also provide modern details and facts about celestial bodies in our solar system, as well as differentiation between them – Terrestrial and Jovian planets, exoplanets, the practical meaning of “dwarf planets”, asteroids, comets, and Kuiper Belt and Trans-Neptunian Objects. Beyond this we may study stars and galaxies, star clusters, nebulae, black holes, clusters of galaxies and dark matter. Finally, we may study cosmology -- the structure and history of the universe. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

1115L [101L]. Introduction to Astronomy Laboratory [Astronomy Laboratory] (1)

Introduction to Astronomy Lab will include hands-on exercises that work to reinforce concepts covered in the lecture, and may include additional components that introduce students to the night sky. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Pre- or corequisite: 1115.

1996 [109]. Selected Topics [Selected Topics in Astronomy] (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Designed as a follow-up course to 1115. This course will focus on one topic in astronomy for an in-depth investigation of its core concepts and implications. May be repeated, but topics must be substantially different from semester to semester. Prerequisite: 1115. {Offered upon demand}

2110 [270]. General Astronomy I [General Astronomy] (3)

An introductory course covering the basics of the night sky, relevant physics, and the Solar System. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. First of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250.  Pre- or corequisite: Any physics course numbered 1200 or higher. {Fall}

2110L [270L]. General Astronomy I Laboratory [General Astronomy Laboratory I] (1)

Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with ASTR 2110. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2110. {Fall}

2115 [271]. General Astronomy II [General Astronomy] (3)

An introductory course covering the Sun, stars, the Milky Way, galaxies and cosmology. The level of math is trigonometry and pre-calculus. Second of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: MATH 1230 or MATH 1250.  Pre- or corequisite: Any physics course numbered 1200 or higher. {Spring}

2115L [271L]. General Astronomy II Laboratory [General Astronomy Laboratory I] (1)

Students learn how to carry out astronomical observations using actual telescopes. Students learn the basics of the celestial sphere, telescope design and characteristics planning observations, astronomical data reduction, how to make measurements from astronomical data, interpreting results, and writing reports. The topics of the lab are aligned with ASTR 2115. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2115. {Spring}

*421. Concepts of Astrophysics I (3)

Gravitation, radiation, relativity, stellar atmospheres, structure, and evolution. Prerequisite: PHYC **330. {Fall}

422 / 538. Concepts of Astrophysics II (3)

Applications of advanced astrophysical concepts to the interstellar medium, star formation, the Milky Way, external galaxies, and cosmology. Prerequisite: *421. {Spring}

423 / 539. Radio Astronomy (3)

Single dish and aperture synthesis radio observations; emission processes at radio wavelengths: synchrotron radiation, thermal bremsstrahlung. Prerequisite: PHYC **330. {Alternate Springs}

426 / 526. Optics and Instrumentation (3)

Principles of optics and quantum physics applied to modern astronomical instrumentation (over a wide range of electromagnetic wavelengths), data acquisition and processing. {Offered upon demand}

*427. Topics in Planetary Astronomy (3)

Planetary physics; planetary investigation using space vehicles; optical properties of planetary atmospheres. {Offered upon demand}

*455. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



456. Honors Problems (1, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as PHYC 456) Independent studies course for students seeking departmental honors.

526 / 426. Optics and Instrumentation (3)

Principles of optics and quantum physics applied to modern astronomical instrumentation (over a wide range of electromagnetic wavelengths), data acquisition and processing. {Offered upon demand}

536. Advanced Astrophysics I (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Astrophysical problems illustrating E&M and classical/statistical mechanics: expansion of the universe; dark matter; big-bang nucleosynthesis; stellar interiors; neutron stars; supernovae. May be repeated when topics are different. {Alternate Falls}

537. Advanced Astrophysics II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Astrophysical problems as illustrations of quantum mechanics: atoms; molecules; spectral lines; ionized regions surrounding stars; centers of active galaxies; Lyman-alpha forest. May be repeated when topics are different. Prerequisite: PHYC 521. {Alternate Springs}

538 / 422. Concepts of Astrophysics II (3)

Applications of advanced astrophysical concepts to the interstellar medium, star formation, the Milky Way, external galaxies, and cosmology. Prerequisite: *421. {Spring}

539 / 423. Radio Astronomy (3)

Single dish and aperture synthesis radio observations; emission processes at radio wavelengths: synchrotron radiation, thermal bremsstrahlung. Prerequisite: PHYC **330. {Alternate Springs}




Business Computer and Information Systems (BCIS)


1110 [CS 150L]. Introduction to Information Systems [Computing for Business Students] (3)

Students will use personal computers in campus laboratories to learn use of a word processor, a spreadsheet and a database management program. The course will also cover access to the World Wide Web and other topics of current importance to business students. Course cannot apply to major or minor in Computer Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1215 or (MATH 1215X and MATH 1215Y and MATH 1215Z) or MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522.




Biochemistry (BIOC)


*423. Introductory Biochemistry (3)

Introductory course into metabolic reactions within the cell with emphasis on a chemical understanding of the way the cell integrates and controls intermediary metabolism; also included are quantitative problems in pH control, enzyme kinetics and energetics. BIOC 423 should not be taken by students who anticipate majoring in Biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM **302. {Fall, Spring}

445 / 545. Intensive Introductory Biochemistry I (4)

An intensive introduction to the physical and chemical properties of proteins and enzymes; enzymatic catalysis; signal transduction; structure, synthesis and processing of nucleic acids. Prerequisite: BIOL 2410C and CHEM **302. Restriction: admitted to B.A. or B.S. Biochemistry. {Fall}

446. Intensive Introductory Biochemistry II (4)

An intensive introduction to intermediary metabolism and hormonal control of catabolic and anabolic pathways.  Prerequisite: 445. {Spring}

448L. Biochemical Methods (3)

Biochemical and molecular biology laboratory course including authentic exposure to: cell culture; nucleic acid and protein purification; bioinformatics.  Prerequisite: 446. Restriction: admitted to B.A. Biochemistry or B.S. Biochemistry. {Fall, Spring}

451. Physical Biochemistry (3)

A quantative physical chemical approach to analyzing macromolecular structure and function; electrophoretic and hydrodynamic methods; mass spectrometry; optical and vibrational spectroscopic methods; nuclear magnetic resonance; diffraction methods; and computational techniques. Prerequisite: 445 and (CHEM **311 or CHEM **315). {Fall}

463 / 563. Biochemistry of Disease I (3)

Four four-week topics, each designed to develop advanced understanding of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology in the context of human health and disease. Prerequisite: 446. {Fall}

464 / 564. Biochemistry of Disease II (3)

Four four-week topics, each designed to develop advanced understanding of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology in the context of human health and disease.  Prerequisite: 446. {Spring}

*465. Biochemistry Education (3)

Seminars and readings in current methods of Biochemistry education. The course includes a practical experience in Biochemistry education techniques and practices. Prerequisite: 446 (minimum grade of "B"). Restriction: permission of instructor.

495. Topics in Biochemistry (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course will build upon knowledge obtained from the Biochemistry core courses designed for undergraduate majors in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Specific topics may vary by semester. Prerequisite: 446. {Spring} 

497. Senior Honors Research (3)

Senior thesis based on independent research. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall}

498. Senior Honors Research (3)

Senior thesis based on independent research. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring}

499. Undergraduate Research (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ [1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ])

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

545 / 445. Intensive Introductory Biochemistry I (4)

An intensive introduction to the physical and chemical properties of proteins and enzymes; enzymatic catalysis; signal transduction; structure, synthesis and processing of nucleic acids. {Fall}

563 / 463. Biochemistry of Disease I (3)

Four four-week topics, each designed to develop advanced understanding of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology in the context of human health and disease. Prerequisite: 446. {Fall}

564 / 464. Biochemistry of Disease II (3)

Four four-week topics, each designed to develop advanced understanding of biochemistry, cell and molecular biology in the context of human health and disease.  Prerequisite: 446. {Spring}




Biology (BIOL)


1110 [110]. General Biology [Biology Non-Majors] (3)

S. Witt.This course introduces non-science majors to basic biological concepts including, but not limited to, the properties of life, biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. Three lectures.  Credit for both this course and BIOL 1140 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. {Fall, Spring}

1110L [112L]. General Biology Laboratory [Biology Laboratory for Non-Majors] (1)

S. Witt. This laboratory course for non-science majors compliments the concepts covered in the associated general biology lecture course. Students will learn quantitative skills involved in scientific measurement and data analysis. Students will also perform experiments related to topics such as biochemistry, cell structure and function, molecular biology, evolution, taxonomic classification and phylogeny, biodiversity, and ecology. One 3-hour lab per week including plant and animal diversity, techniques and investigation of current issues. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Pre- or corequisite: 1110. {Fall, Spring}

1140 [123]. Biology for Health Sciences [Biology for Health Related Sciences and Non-Majors] (3)

Howe, Kennedy, Shaner. This introductory biology course for students interested in health science careers focuses on the concepts of chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, and regulation of gene expression. Not accepted toward a Biology major. Credit for both this course and BIOL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. {Fall, Spring}

1140L [124L]. Biology for Health Sciences Laboratory [Biology for Health Related Sciences and Non-Majors Lab] (1)

S. Witt. This course is a laboratory that complements the concepts learned in the theory course. Students will learn skills involved in scientific measurement, microscopy, and mathematical analysis. Students will also perform experiments and data analysis related to cell structure and function, chemistry, enzyme activity, and genetics. Optional laboratory to accompany 1140. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Pre- or corequisite: 1140.

191. Biodiversity (2)

Introduction to the diversity of organisms and their characteristics.

2110C [201L]. Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Lecture and Laboratory [Molecular and Cell Biology] (4)

Adema, Cunningham, Hofkin, Howe, Natvig, Stricker, Vesbach. The scientific method, the role of water in cell biology, carbon and molecular diversity, macromolecules, introduction to metabolism, tour of cell structures and functions, membrane structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell communication and the cell cycle. Three lectures, 1 discussion section. Students who completed AP Chemistry in high school should see the instructor of record or a Biology department advisor. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1215 or CHEM 131) and CHEM 1215L. {Fall, Spring}

2210 [237]. Human Anatomy and Physiology I [Human Anatomy and Physiology I for the Health Sciences] (3)

Shaner, Swan. This course is the first of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on anatomic, directional, and sectional terminology, basic cellular structure and metabolism, tissue differentiation and characteristics, and organ system structure and function; Specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Three lectures. Prerequisite: ((1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or CHEM 1215). {Fall, Spring}

2210L [247L]. Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory [Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I] (1)

Laboratory work using cadavers. Anatomy stressed with appropriate physiological work. Topics integrated with 2210. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2210. {Fall, Spring}

2225 [238]. Human Anatomy and Physiology II [Human Anatomy and Physiology II for the Health Sciences] (3)

Shaner, Swan. Anatomy and Physiology II is the second half of the two-part A&P sequence offered by UNM. It is an integrated study of human structure and function that covers the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. There is a corresponding laboratory course. These courses are designed to complement one another and while the lab is not required, it is strongly suggested that they be taken together. Three lectures. Prerequisite: 2210. {Fall, Spring}

2225L [248L]. Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory [Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II] (1)

Continuation of 2210L. Topics integrated with 2225. Three hours lab. Pre- or corequisite: 2225. {Fall, Spring}

223. Biotechnology Laboratory Techniques I (4)

The first course in a series of three which provides credit for students who are in the Biotechnology Program at CNM and working towards a B.S. in Biology with a concentration in Biotechnology at UNM. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

224. Biotechnology Laboratory Techniques II (4)

The second course in a series of three which provides credit for students who are in the Biotechnology Program at CNM and working towards a B.S. in Biology with a concentration in Biotechnology at UNM. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 223.

225. Biotechnology Laboratory Techniques III (3)

The third course in a series of three which provides credit for students who are in the Biotechnology Program at CNM and working towards a B.S. in Biology with a concentration in Biotechnology at UNM. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

2305 [239]. Microbiology for Health Sciences [Microbiology for Health Sciences and Non-Majors] (4)

Couch. This course introduces the basic principles of microbial structure, genetics, and physiology, virology, parasitology, disease, pathogenicity, epidemiology and immunology. Only some emphasis is given to basic biological principles. The course is designed for those obtaining a career in the health sciences. Not accepted toward a Biology major or minor. Credit for both this course and BIOL **351/**352L may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: ((1140 and 1140L) or 2110C) and (CHEM 1120C or (CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L)). {Fall, Spring}

2410C [202L]. Principles of Biology: Genetics Lecture and Laboratory [Genetics] (4)

Bergthorsson, Cripps, Hofkin, Howe, Katju. Mitosis, meiosis, Mendelian genetics, chromosomes and inheritance, molecular basis of inheritance, genes to proteins, genetic models (viruses and bacteria), eukaryotic genomes, genetic basis of development and overview of genomes. Three lectures, 1 discussion section.  Prerequisite: 2110C and ((CHEM 1215 or CHEM 131) and CHEM 1215L). Pre- or corequisite: (CHEM 1225 or CHEM 132) and CHEM 1225L). {Fall, Spring}

300. Evolution (3)

C. Witt. Basic principles, and contemporary issues of evolution. Three lectures. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

303. Ecology and Evolution (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Introduction to concepts in ecology and evolution including history of evolutionary thought; microevolution (including natural selection); speciation; macroevolution; patterns of species diversity and abundance; organismal, behavioral, population, community and ecosystem ecology; and conservation biology. Prerequisite: 2410C. Pre- or corequisite: 303L and (MATH 1430 or MATH 1512).

303L. Ecology and Evolution Laboratory (1, may be repeated three times Δ)

An experiment-based approach to understanding core concepts in ecology and evolution. Students will develop hypotheses, collect data, evaluate their hypotheses, and explain their conclusions in an ecological or evolutionary context. Corequisite: 303.

304. Plant and Animal Form and Function (3, may be repeated three times Δ)

Exploration of relationships between structure and function in plants and animals including plant growth; transport; nutrition; reproduction; development; control systems; and animal nutrition; circulation; reproduction; development; and immune, control and nervous systems. Prerequisite: 303 and 303L and ((CHEM 1225 and CHEM 1225L) or CHEM 132). Pre- or corequisite: 304L and (MATH 1430 or MATH 1512).

304L. Plant and Animal Form and Function Laboratory (1, may be repeated three times Δ)

An experiment-based approach to understanding the relationship between structure and function in plants and animals. Students will develop hypotheses, collect data, evaluate their hypotheses, and explain their conclusions. Corequisite: 304.

310. Principles of Ecology (3)

Rudgers. A comprehensive survey of the ecology of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems. Three lectures, 3 hours lab or field exercise. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

310L. Principles of Ecology Laboratory (1)

Laboratory for BIOL 310. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Corequisite: 310.

**351. General Microbiology (3)

Sinsabaugh, Vesbach. Anatomy, physiology and ecology of microorganisms. Principles of bacterial techniques, host-parasite relationships and infection and immunity. Three lectures.  Credit for both this course and BIOL 2305 may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Pre- or corequisite: **352L. {Fall, Spring}

**352L. General Microbiology Laboratory (1)

Methods and techniques used in microbiology. 1 hour lab. Credit for both this course and BIOL 2305 may not be applied toward a degree program. Pre- or corequisite: **351. {Fall, Spring}

360L. General Botany (4)

Hanson, Marshall, Shaner, Taylor. Overview of plant anatomy, physiology, classification, evolution and ecology. Covers both higher and lower plants. Two lectures, 4 hours lab. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Fall}

365. Evolution of Human Sexuality (3)

Thornhill. An examination of how natural selection has shaped the sexual psychologies of men and women and how evolutionary theory can guide the study of sexual psychology and behavior. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

*371L. Invertebrate Biology (4)

Hofkin, Loker, Stricker. Survey of the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on evolutionary and ecological relationships, and the correlation of structure with function. Three lectures, 4 hours lab. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Fall}

379. Conservation Biology (3)

Snell, Turner. Importance of biological diversity from ecological, aesthetic, economic and political viewpoints. Extinction as a past, present and future process, and the roles of genetics, levels of biological organization, reserves and laws in the protection and recovery of endangered organisms. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

386L. General Vertebrate Zoology (4)

Kennedy, Poe, Snell, Turner. Ecology, behavior, sociology, adaptations, and evolution of the vertebrates. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Fall, Spring}

400. Senior Honors Thesis (1-3, no limit Δ)

Original theoretical and/or experimental work under supervision. Work for the thesis is carried on throughout the senior year. A maximum of 4 hours credited towards a biology major; credits over 4 contribute to upper level Arts and Sciences requirements. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

*401. Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology (3 or 4, may be repeated three times Δ)

Continually changing selection of sections that satisfy upper-division Cell/Molecular breadth requirement. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

402 / 502. Topics in Biology (1-3, no limit Δ)

Maximum of 4 hours credited towards the biology major and 2 hours towards the biology minor; credits over 2 contribute to upper level Arts and Sciences requirements. Restriction: senior standing and permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

404 / 504. Topics in Physiology (3 or 4, may be repeated three times Δ)

Continually changing selection of sections that satisfy upper-division Physiology breadth requirement. (PH) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

405 / 505. Ecosystem Dynamics (3)

Collins, Litvak, Waide. Understand structure and function of diverse ecological systems of North America; use of on-line Long-term Ecological Research databases. (EE) Prerequisite: 203 and 203L. {Spring}

*406. Topics in Organismal Biology (3 or 4, may be repeated once Δ)

Continually changing selection of sections that satisfy upper-division Organismal Biology breadth requirement. (OR) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

408L / 508L. Bosque Internship (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Eichhorst. UNM students train as interns with the Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program to mentor K-12 students and teachers in monthly data collection at field sites along the Rio Grande floodplain. Study includes ecosystem dynamics and environmental education components. Weekly on- and off-campus meetings (K-12 interaction limited in summer session). (EE) Prerequisite: 1110 or (304 and 304L). {Summer, Fall, Spring}

409 / 509. Topics in Ecology-Evolution (3 or 4, may be repeated three times Δ)

Continually changing selection of sections that satisfy upper-division Ecology/Evolution breadth requirement. (EE) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

410 / 510. Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics (4)

This course focuses on methods, both experimental and computational, to study the structure of genomes and to analyze gene expression and protein function on a genome-wide scale. Computational topics include graph approaches in sequence assembly; discriminant analysis in gene finding; dynamic programming in sequence comparison; and clustering techniques in the analysis of gene expression data. Three lectures. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L.

*412. Developmental Biology (3)

Cripps, Stricker. Comparative biology of animal development emphasizing regulatory mechanisms. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

*416L. Histology (4)

Stricker. Microscopic structure of vertebrate tissues, emphasizing correlation of structure and function. Three hours lecture, 3 hours lab. (PH) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Fall}

419 / 519. Topics in Interdisciplinary Science (3 or 4, may be repeated three times Δ)

Continually changing selection of section that satisfy upper-division Interdisciplinary breadth requirement. (ID) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

*425. Molecular Genetics (3)

Molecular biology of the gene. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

*429. Molecular Cell Biology I (3)

Cellular processes with emphasis on membranes; includes reading original landmark papers in cell biology. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L and (CHEM 2120 or (CHEM **301 and CHEM 303L)). {Fall}

*435. Animal Physiology (3)

Toolson, Wolf. The function of organ systems in animals, emphasizing neuromuscular, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal physiology. (PH) Prerequisite: *371L or 386L.  Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring, alternate years}

445 / 545. Biology of Toxins (3)

Toolson. Principles of toxicology; pharmacology and biotransformation of xenobiotics. Mechanism of action, medical uses, and evolutionary ecology of biological toxins. (PH) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

446 / 546. Laboratory Methods in Molecular Biology (4)

Adema, Cripps, Hanson, Natvig, Vesbach. Principles of DNA and RNA purification, enzymatic manipulation of nucleic acids, molecular cloning, gel electrophoresis, hybridization procedures and nucleotide sequencing. Two hours lecture, 5 hours lab. (CM) Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

*450. General Virology (3)

Hofkin, Miller. Structure, properties, and molecular biology of viruses; virus-host interactions, multiplication, pathology, epidemiology, effects of chemical and physical agents, classification. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L and **351 and **352L. {Spring}

*451. Microbial Ecology (3)

Sinsabaugh, Vesbach. Role of microorganisms in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Emphasis on biogeochemistry and nutrient cycling. Three lectures. (EE) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Fall}

*455. Ethology: Animal Behavior (3)

A survey of behavior patterns in animals, with emphasis on adaptive significance. (EE) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

456 / 556. Immunology (3)

Cunningham, Hofkin, Miller. Immunoglobulin structure, antigen-antibody reactions, immunity and hypersensitivity; experimental approach will be emphasized. Three lectures. (PH) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L or Pre- or corequisite: BIOC 445. {Fall, Spring}

457 / 557. Diversity and Evolution of Animal Sexual Strategies (3)

The course surveys the diversity of strategies in animal sexual systems and examines the evolutionary derivation of those strategies. The influence of varying sexual strategies on animal behavior, morphology, diversity and other attributes is examined. Prerequisite: 203 and 203L and 204 and 204L.

461L. Introduction to Tropical Biology (4)

Cook. Marine and terrestrial tropical environments, primarily in the Caribbean; topics stressed may include organisms, communities, structure, function, distribution, geology, history, politics, ecology and others. Two lectures, 2 hours lab, one-week field trip to the Caribbean and field trip fee is required. Open to majors and/or non-majors. (EE) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

*463L. Flora of New Mexico (4)

Lowrey. Identification, classification, nomenclature, and geography of vascular seed plants in New Mexico. Survey of adaptations and evolutionary trends in plants of the Southwest. Field trips. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. (OR) Prerequisite: 360L. {Fall}

471 / 571. Plant Physiological Ecology (3)

Pockman. Interaction of plants with their environment, covering plant water relations, carbon gain and utilization and soil mineral nutrition. Common research methodologies will be demonstrated in class. (ID) Prerequisite: 310 and 360L. {Spring, alternate years}

475 / 575. Community Ecology (3)

Collins. Plant community structure and dynamics in North American deserts and grasslands. Field trip to Sevilleta LTER required. (EE) Prerequisite: 203 and 203L and 204 and 204L. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring}

480 / 580. Global Change Biology (3)

Litvak. An advanced ecology course that gives students a broad overview of biological responses to global change at multiple levels of organization, and the scientific approaches used to study these responses. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L.

482L / 582L. Parasitology (4)

Adema, Hofkin, Loker. The protozoa and worms important in human and veterinary medicine. Emphasis on life histories, epidemiology and ecology of parasites with laboratory practice in identification and experimentation. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. (OR) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

*483L. Discovering Arthropods (4)

Introduction to the non-insect arthropods (millipedes, centipedes, arachnids, crustaceans and their relatives), their diversity and natural history. Prerequisite: 203 and 203L and 204 and 204L.

484 / 584. Biology of Fungi (4)

Natvig. Systematics, reproduction and ecology of fungi. Biology of economically and medically important fungi, and the roles of introduced fungi in shaping human history and natural environments. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L.

485L / 585L. Entomology (4)

K. Miller. Classification, phylogeny, natural history and literature of insects. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. (OR) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

*486L. Ornithology (4)

C. Witt, Wolf. Classification phylogeny, natural history and literature of birds. Field trips required. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. (OR) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Fall, alternate years}

*487L. Ichthyology (4)

Turner. Classification, phylogeny, natural history and literature of fishes. All-day field trips and one or more overnight field trips required. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. (OR) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Fall}

*488L. Herpetology (4)

Poe, Snell. Classification, phylogeny, natural history and literature of reptiles and amphibians. All-day field trips and one or more overnight field trips required. Two lectures, 6 hours lab. (OR) Prerequisite: 386L.

*489L. Mammalogy (4)

Cook. Classification, phylogeny, natural history and literature of mammals. All-day field trips and one or more overnight field trips required. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. (OR) Prerequisite: 386L. {Fall, alternate years}

*490. Biology of Infectious Organisms (3)

Hofkin, Loker. The full spectrum of infectious entities including prions, viruses and parasitic prokaryotes and eukaryotes will be discussed with respect to their transmissibility, interactions with immune systems and their influences on evolutionary processes and biodiversity issues. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring, alternate years}

491 / 591. Population Genetics (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 491 / 591) Katju. This course investigates how genetic variation is patterned within and between and how these patterns change over time. Topics include neutral theory, population structure, phylogenetics, coalescent theory, molecular clock, and laboratory methods. (EE)

492 / 592. Introductory Mathematical Biology (3)

Toolson. Application of mathematics to models of biological systems, from genes to communities. Emphasis placed on broadly-applicable concepts and qualitative solution techniques. Laboratory exercises introduce students to MATLAB programming. (ID) Prerequisite: (MATH 1430 and MATH 1440) or (MATH 1512 and MATH 1522).

*494. Biogeography (3)

Smith. Geographical distributions of organisms: patterns and their ecological and historical causes. (EE) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring, alternate years}

*495. Limnology (3)

Dahm. Biological, physical and chemical interactions in fresh water ecosystems. Three lectures. (ID) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L and ((CHEM 1225 and CHEM 1225L) or (PHYS 1240 or PHYS 1320)). {Spring}

*496L. Limnology Laboratory (1)

Dahm. Techniques for studying the biology, chemistry and physics of aquatic ecosystems. Pre- or corequisite: *495. {Spring}

497. Principles of Gene Expression (3)

Cripps. A detailed and critical study of how different genes are regulated during the life of an organism, principally at the level of transcription. (CM) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L.

498L / 598L. Genome Editing (4)

This course will train students in learning and using state of the art techniques to manipulate the DNA sequence of cells. Students will develop targeting vectors and isolate mutant lines for analysis. Prerequisite: **351 and **352L.

499. Undergraduate Problems (1-3, no limit Δ)

Maximum of 2 hours credited towards a biology major. Credit not allowed toward a biology minor. Restriction: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

500. New Graduate Student Seminar (1)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

502 / 402. Topics in Biology (1-3, no limit Δ)

Maximum of 4 hours credited towards the biology major. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

504 / 404. Topics in Physiology (3 or 4, may be repeated three times Δ)

Continually changing selection of sections that satisfy upper-division Physiology breadth requirement. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: permission of instructor.

505 / 405. Ecosystem Dynamics (3)

Collins, Litvak, Waide. Understand structure and function of diverse ecological systems of North America; use of on-line Long-term Ecological Research databases. {Spring}

508L / 408L. Bosque Internship (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Eichhorst. UNM students train as interns with the Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program to mentor K-12 students and teachers in monthly data collection at field sites along the Rio Grande floodplain. Study includes ecosystem dynamics and environmental education components. Weekly on- and off-campus meetings. (K-12 interaction limited in summer session). {Summer, Fall, Spring}

509 / 409. Topics in Ecology-Evolution (3 or 4, may be repeated three times Δ)

Continually changing selection of sections that satisfy upper-division Ecology/Evolution breadth requirement. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: permission of instructor.

510 / 410. Ecological and Evolutionary Genomics (4)

This course focuses on methods, both experimental and computational, to study the structure of genomes and to analyze gene expression and protein function on a genome-wide scale. Computational topics include graph approaches in sequence assembly; discriminant analysis in gene finding; dynamic programming in sequence comparison; and clustering techniques in the analysis of gene expression data. Three lectures.

511. Macroecology (3)

Smith. A large-scale statistical approach to study the abundance, distribution and diversity of organisms. {Spring, alternate years}

514. Ecosystem Studies (3)

Collins, Dahm. Study of biological communities emphasizing the interactions between living and non-living parts and the flow of materials and energy between these parts. Three lectures. {Fall}

516. Basic Graduate Ecology (4)

Collins, Litvak, Pockman, Sinsabaugh, Smith, Wearing, Wolf. Major themes in current ecological research, with in-depth exploration of the theoretical and empirical literature of individual, population, community, ecosystem and landscape ecology. Recommended for all Biology Department graduate students in any field of ecology, evolution and behavior. Three lectures, 1.5 hours lab/discussion. {Fall}

517. Basic Graduate Evolution (4)

Katju, Whitney, C. Witt. An in-depth coverage of the primary literature and ideas in the major areas of evolutionary biology: adaptationism, social evolution, phylogeny, molecular evolution, speciation. Recommended for all Biology Department graduate students in any field of ecology, evolution and behavior. Three lectures, 1.5 hours lab/discussion. {Spring}

519 / 419. Topics in Interdisciplinary Science (3 or 4, may be repeated three times Δ)

Continually changing selection of section that satisfy upper-division Interdisciplinary breadth requirement. (ID) Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. Restriction: permission of instructor.

520. Topics in Interdisciplinary Biological and Biomedical Sciences (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH 620, CS 520, ECE 620, STAT 520) Varying interdisciplinary topics taught by collaborative scientists from UNM, SFI, and LANL.

545 / 445. Biology of Toxins (3)

Toolson. Principles of toxicology; pharmacology and biotransformation of xenobiotics. Mechanism of action, medical uses, and evolutionary ecology of biological toxins. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L. {Spring}

546 / 446. Laboratory Methods in Molecular Biology (4)

Cripps, Hanson, Natvig, Vesbach. Principles of DNA and RNA purification, enzymatic manipulation of nucleic acids, molecular cloning, gel electrophoresis, hybridization procedures and nucleotide sequencing. Two hours lecture, 5 hours lab. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

551. Research Problems (1-12, no limit Δ)



556 / 456. Immunology (3)

Cunningham, Hofkin, Miller. Immunoglobulin structure, anitigen-antibody reactions, immunity and hypersensitivity; experimental approach will be emphasized. Three lectures. {Fall, Spring}

557 / 457. Diversity and Evolution of Animal Sexual Strategies (3)

The course surveys the diversity of strategies in animal sexual systems and examines the evolutionary derivation of those strategies. The influence of varying sexual strategies on animal behavior, morphology, diversity and other attributes is examined. Prerequisite: 203 and 203L and 204 and 204L.

561. Tropical Biology (4)

Cook. Marine and terrestrial tropical environments, primarily in the Caribbean; topics stressed may include organisms, communities, structure, function, distribution, geology, history, politics, ecology and others. Two lectures, 2 hours lab, one-week field trip to the Caribbean and field trip fee is required. Open to majors and/or non-majors. {Alternate years}

571 / 471. Plant Physiological Ecology (3)

Pockman. Interaction of plants with their environment, covering plant water relations, carbon gain and utilization and soil mineral nutrition. Common research methodologies will be demonstrated in class. (ID) Prerequisite: 310 and 360L. {Spring, alternate years}

575 / 475. Community Ecology (3)

Collins. Plant community structure and dynamics in North American deserts and grasslands. Field trip to Sevilleta LTER required. {Spring}

580 / 480. Global Change Biology (3)

Litvak. An advanced ecology course that gives students a broad overview of biological responses to global change at multiple levels of organization, and the scientific approaches used to study these responses. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L.

582L / 482L. Parasitology (4)

Hofkin, Loker. The protozoa and worms important in human and veterinary medicine. Emphasis on life histories, epidemiology and ecology of parasites with laboratory practice in identification and experimentation. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. {Spring}

584 / 484. Biology of Fungi (4)

Natvig. Systematics, reproduction and ecology of fungi. Biology of economically and medically important fungi, and the roles of introduced fungi in shaping human history and natural environments. Prerequisite: 304 and 304L.

585L / 485L. Entomology (4)

K. Miller. Classification, phylogeny, natural history and literature of insects. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. {Spring}

591 / 491. Population Genetics (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 591 / 491) Katju. This course investigates how genetic variation is patterned within and between and how these patterns change over time. Topics include neutral theory, population structure, phylogenetics, coalescent theory, molecular clock, and laboratory methods.

592 / 492. Introductory Mathematical Biology (3)

Toolson. Application of mathematics to models of biological systems, from genes to communities. Emphasis placed on broadly-applicable concepts and qualitative solution techniques. Laboratory exercises introduce students to MATLAB programming. Prerequisite: (MATH 1430 and MATH 1440) or (MATH 1512 and MATH 1522).

598L / 498L. Genome Editing (4)

This course will train students in learning and using state of the art techniques to manipulate the DNA sequence of cells. Students will develop targeting vectors and isolate mutant lines for analysis. Prerequisite: **351 and **352L.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

651. Advanced Field Biology (4-8)

Approval of Committee on Studies required.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Biomedical Sciences (BIOM)


*410. Research in Medical Sciences (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Laboratory research in the medical sciences for undergraduate students. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

501. Fundamentals for Graduate Research (1)

This course provides first year students with information for making an educated choice of a dissertation research advisor, of various teaching and research resources and facilities, and teaching and communication skills. {Fall}

505. Special Topics in Biomedical Sciences (1-6 to a maximum of 48 Δ)

This course provides a format to teach current information in a variety of rapidly advancing areas of biomedical research which are not now provided by existing courses. Subject area varies depending on the need for education in a particular area and the faculty member involved. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

506. Special Topics in Biomedical Research (1-2 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

In this course, first year graduate students will participate in research with potential thesis or dissertation mentors and gain first-hand experience in a variety of techniques and approaches to biological problems. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

507. Advanced Molecular Biology (4)

The course covers the structures and functions of nucleic acids and proteins, mechanisms and macromolecular synthesis and principles of enzymology. Prerequisite: organic chemistry, one semester of cell biology or biochemistry. {Fall}

508. Advanced Cell Biology (4)

Course covers advanced topics in cell biology, including microscopy, the nucleus, protein and membrane trafficking, cytoskeleton signal transduction, cell cycle and division and extracellular matrix. Prerequisite: 507. {Fall}

509. Principles of Neurobiology (3)

This course covers cellular structure of neurons and glia, the electrical properties of neurons, intercellular communication, and the formation, maintenance and plasticity of chemical synapses.

510. Physiology (3)

Course designed to provide a fundamental understanding of the basic physiological systems of the body. Topics covered are cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and endocrine physiology.  Prerequisite: 508. {Spring}

514. Immunobiology (3)

This is a comprehensive, fundamentals-based immunology course for graduate students in the biomedical sciences or related fields. The course will have a problem-based component that will introduce students to experimental design in immunological research. {Spring}

515. Cancer Biology (3)

Fundamental elements of cancer development and progression will be the focus of this course. Basic biochemical and genetic mechanisms of tumorigenesis, including genomic instability, principles of tumor cell invasion and growth dysregulation will be emphasized.

522. Experimental Design and Methods in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (3)

This case-based course is intended for first year graduate students and focuses on practical issues of how to design, plan and conduct scientific studies through appropriate use of experimental methods and data analysis.

525. Journal Club: Cell and Molecular Basis of Disease (2 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

Course offers new graduate students experience in oral presentation skills, experience in reading and discussing scientific literature and exposure to research seminars. Student led discussions partner with weekly Cell and Molecular Basis of Disease Seminar. {Fall, Spring}

527. Journal Club: Translational Science (1, no limit Δ)

Course offers new graduate students experience in oral presentation skills, experience in reading and discussing scientific literature and exposure to research seminars. Restriction: admitted to Doctor of Medicine or Ph.D. Biomedical Sciences, permission of department

530. Seminar: Cell and Molecular Basis of Disease (1 to a maximum of 5 Δ)

The Cell and Molecular Basis of Disease Seminar is a cross-cutting, interdepartmental seminar series offered for graduate credit. Weekly seminars are presented by preeminent scientists on a wide variety of broadly relevant research topics. {Fall, Spring}

531. Neurophysiology (1, may be repeated once Δ)

The course will cover the fundamental properties of ion channels in excitable membrane, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity. In addition, the course will discuss the organization and principles of auditory, visual and chemical senses. Prerequisite: 509.

532. Neurochemistry (1 [3])

The course emphasis is on basic neurochemical mechanisms that underlie functioning of the central nervous system (CNS), both normal functioning and in disease states, focusing on major concepts, techniques and recent advances in neurochemistry. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, even years}

533. Functional Neuroanatomy [Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy] (1 [4])

Provides a background and understanding of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system. The course includes both lectures and laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: 509. {Fall, odd years}

534. Neuropharmacology (1)

The course will focus on fundamental principles of pharmacology, emphasizing molecular and cellular actions of drugs on synaptic transmission and techniques used in the study of neuropharmacology. Prerequisite: 509.

535. Seminar: Neuroscience (1 to a maximum of 10 Δ)

Weekly presentation of current topics in clinical neuroscience and in neuroscience basic research.

536. Journal Club: Neuroscience (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Course offers new graduate students experience in oral presentation skills, experience in reading and discussing scientific literature and exposure to research seminars. Restriction: permission of department.

537. Advanced Topics in Neuroscience (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Study Projects in the literature of Neuroscience. Restriction: permission of instructor.

538. Neurobiology of Alcoholism (1)

The course focuses on the actions of alcohol on neurotransmitter systems. Prerequisite: 509.

539. Molecular Neurobiology (1)

The course focuses on the mechanisms controlling gene expression during the development and maturation of neuronal circuits. Topics covered include genetic and epigenetic regulation of neuronal function as well as the role of non-coding RNA. Prerequisite: 509.

540. University Teacher Training (2)

An introduction to the principles of how people learn and methods of teaching and assessment. Special workshops provide hands-on experience with effective lecture preparation and tutorial group facilitation for problem-based learning. Restriction: permission of instructor.

541. Teacher Training Workshops (1-2, may be repeated twice Δ)

Workshops emphasizes skill development in education theory and curriculum development or student assessment and feedback through didactic lectures and hands-on experience. Workshops are led by School of Medicine Teacher Education and Development (TED) Office and the Teaching Assistant Resource Center (TARC) faculty. Restriction: permission of instructor.

542. Teaching Assistant Practicum (1-4, may be repeated three times Δ)

BSGP students enrolled in this course earn course credit for serving as teaching assistants. The number of credits is determined by the number of contact hours. Arrangements are made on an individual basis. Prerequisite: 540 or 541.

543. Independent Education Immersion for Teaching Scholars (1-4, may be repeated once Δ)

Emphasizes skill development as an independent instructor. Requires development or implementation of independent teaching or educational project. Scholars are evaluated on teaching materials, oral and written communication skills, and project design and tool development. Arrangements for service as course instructor are made on an individual basis. Prerequisite: 542. Restriction: permission of instructor.

546. Advanced Topics in Pathology (1-3)



548. Seminar: Biochemistry Molecular and Cellular Biology (1 to a maximum of 10 Δ)

{Fall, Spring}

555. Problem-Based Research Bioethics (1)

This is a problem-based discussion course on topics in bioethics such as publication credits and authorships; conflict of interest and fraud, scientific misconduct, human genomics and other relevant issues. {Fall}

556. Research Design for Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course will introduce the variety of study designs that are used to conduct clinical and translational research, including qualitative, observational, experimental, quasi experimental, non-experimental and mixed methods designs. Restriction: permission of course director.

557. Measurement in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course will cover qualitative and quantitative instrument design, construction, theory, and implementation; qualitative data analysis and interpretation; assessment of measurement reliability, validity, accuracy, precision, specificity and sensitivity. Restriction: permission of course director.

558. Study Implementation and Project Management in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course trains researchers in the management of clinical and translational research studies, including organizational processes to implement and conduct a funded research study, with financial, personnel, and business management and compliance issues. Restriction: permission of course director.

559. Biostatistics in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Overview of the basic principles and methods of biostatistics designed specifically for clinical and translational research scientists. Computer software is used to analyze clinical and translational data sets. Restriction: permission of course director.

560. Current and Emerging Technologies in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Course covers key biomedical research technologies currently in use for studies at the cellular and molecular, clinical and community levels, concentrating on the advantages and disadvantages of technologies for application to specific translational research studies. Restriction: permission of course director.

561. Patient Outcomes in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Overview health care economics and patient outcomes research, including public policy issues associated with the rising cost of health care, patient-reported outcomes, clinical outcomes, and economic outcomes, and evaluation of patient outcomes research. Restriction: permission of course director.

562. Epidemiology in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Course introduces the student to Epidemiology, the study of causes, distribution and control of disease in populations. A methodology to identify risk factors for disease and to determine optimal treatment approaches. Restriction: permission of course director.

563. Conducting Clinical and Translational Research within Health Care Systems (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course will cover the dimensions of a variety of health care systems and settings and discuss potential areas for investigation; challenging learners to consider the opportunities where research can contribute to system improvements. Restriction: permission of course director.

564. Biomedical Informatics in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course covers information technology tools and biomedical informatics strategies to optimize collection, storage, retrieval, and intra-/inter-institutional sharing of quantitative and qualitative data in support of clinical and translational research. Restriction: permission of course director.

565. Cultural Competence in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

This course covers the impact of culture including values, tradition, history and institutions, sources of health care disparities, how culture influences in the way patients respond to medical services, prevention and physician delivery of services. Restriction: permission of course director.

566. Grantsmanship in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Grant preparation fundamentals focused on writing and submitting a competitive research or fellowship application that meets prevailing guidelines, addresses an important hypothesis-driven research question and is responsive to critical feedback and review. Restriction: permission of course director.

567. Biomedical Ethics and Regulatory Compliance in Clinical and Translational Research (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

History and development of biomedical ethics in theory and practice within health care, tenets of autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice as they pertain to human clinical research and the development of health care public policy. Restriction: permission of course director.

568. Seminar in Clinical and Translational Research (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ))

Includes integration and synthesis of concepts integral to clinical and translational research, providing problem-based and cross-cutting case studies for analysis/discussion, networking opportunities and a platform to demonstrate competencies. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of course director.

569. FDA Drug and Device Development in Clinical and Translational Research (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course provides researchers with information to prepare them to conduct clinical investigations of drugs and devices, and establish personal research equipoise. Restriction: permission of course director.

570. Scientific Writing in Clinical and Translational Research (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Theoretical and practical studies of writing for the translational sciences. Addresses writing for both popular and professional audiences. Restriction: permission of course director. 

572. Advanced Epidemiology in Clinical and Translational Research (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Epidemiologic principles essential to clinical research: Study design, measures of disease occurrence and association, selection bias and confounding, reproducibility and validity, measurement bias, interaction, causal inference.

583. Seminar: Pathology (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Weekly presentations of current topics in pathology. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

590. Topics in Biochemistry (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

594. Topics in Environmental Disease (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Advanced readings in topics relating to toxicology and environmental disease, including areas such as chemical teratogenesis, reactive oxygen species, respiratory toxicology, receptor-medicated toxicology and environmentally induced cancer. Prerequisite: PHRM 580. {Fall, Spring}

598. Directed Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Student will develop an Individual Performance Contract with a faculty member to include key readings and at least four professional and career development activities. Restriction: permission of instructor.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

605. Membrane Trafficking Seminar (1 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

A weekly journal club style course for advanced graduate students to participate in journal club presentations and discussion of current literature in the field of intracellular membrane trafficking. {Fall, Spring}

615. Seminar: Signal Transduction and Cell Adhesion (1, no limit Δ)

Weekly presentation of current topics in signal transduction and cell adhesion research. {Fall, Spring}

616. Molecular Virology (3)

Fundamental principles related to interactions of animal viruses with host cells. Topics include virus chemical and physical properties, virus classification, virus cultivation and assay, viral replication and morphogenesis, persistent infections, viral oncology and other pertinent subjects. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL *450 or BIOL 556. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, odd years}

620. Seminar: Molecular Genetics and Microbiology (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Weekly presentations of current topics in Immunology and Microbiology. {Fall, Spring}

625. Advanced Topics in Immunology and Microbiology (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

May be taken three times to a maximum of 9 credit hours. Prerequisite: biochemistry, general microbiology or equivalent. {Offered upon demand}

642. Advanced Topics in Cell Biology (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

An advanced graduate-level course in which current information in a variety of rapidly advancing areas of cell biology research is taught. This course is usually taught in seminar format. Subject area varies depending on the need for education in a particular area and the faculty member involved. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

646. Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

An advanced graduate-level course in which current information in a variety of rapidly advancing areas of molecular biology research is taught. This course is usually taught in seminar format. Subject area varies depending on the need for education in a particular area and the faculty member involved. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

652. Immunopathogenesis of Infectious Diseases (2)

This course will cover basic models of immunopathogenesis and immune evasion mechanisms using well-characterized infectious disease models. Topics will include host mechanisms of microbial clearance, immune-mediated inflammation and pathological effects of pathogens and microbial mechanisms of avoiding host attacks.

657. Advanced Topics in Cellular and Systems Physiology (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

This is an advanced graduate level course covering current, rapidly changing topics in physiology. Taught in a combination lecture/seminar format, the subject area varies depending on the expertise of the faculty member(s) involved. Restriction: permission of instructor.

659. Seminar: Regulatory and Systems Biology (1 to a maximum of 10 Δ)

Weekly presentations of current topics in regulatory and systems biology.

695. Research in Basic Medical Sciences (1-6, no limit Δ)



699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Biomedical Engineering (BME)


444 / 544. Thermodynamics of Biological Systems (3)

Principles of chemical thermodynamics will be considered and applied to the understanding of biological systems and to the development of biotechnological applications. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring}

517. Applied Biology for Biomedical Engineers (3)

(Also offered as CBE 517 / 417) Emphasis on engineering principles and analysis of: (i) the cell as a complete system, including cellular subsystems, structures and functions; and (ii) select higher order systems of human physiology. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

544 / 444. Thermodynamics of Biological Systems (3)

Principles of chemical thermodynamics will be considered and applied to the understanding of biological systems and to the development of biotechnological applications. Restriction: permission of instructor or BME graduate advisor. {Spring}

547. Biomedical Engineering Research Practices (3)

(Also offered as CBE 547 / 447) Students will develop research, presentation, and scientific writing skills for theses, proposals, invention disclosures and journal articles. The course includes oral presentations, case studies of research ethics, technology transfer and manuscript preparation. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

551. Problems (1-3, may be repeated once Δ)

Advanced study, design, or research either on an individual or small group basis with an instructor.

556. Protein and Nucleic Acid Engineering (3)

Students will learn the scientific principles and methods for engineering and manufacturing custom proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates. The course will explicitly discuss methods and tools used in the production of engineered biomacromolecules. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

558. Methods of Analysis in Bioengineering (3)

Presents applied analytical and numerical mathematical methods in the context of biomedical engineering problems. Introduces statistical methods for the design of experiments and analysis of experimental data in research and development activities. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring}

567. Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1 to a maximum of 8)

Students will gain insight into scientific presentations and current biomedical engineering research by presenting their research and actively participating in an external research seminar, which will feature outstanding external and internal researchers as speakers. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

572. Biomaterials Engineering (3)

(Also offered as CBE 572 / 472) Introduction to biomaterials currently in use, including commercial and research applications. Includes an understanding of a material's properties, biological responses to the materials, clinical context of their use, manufacturing processes, and regulatory issues. Restriction: permission of instructor or BME graduate advisor. {Fall, odd years}

575. Biomechanics (3)

Course covers biomechanical aspects of skeletal, biomaterial, energetic, muscle, neural, cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

579. Tissue Engineering (3)

(Also offered as CBE 579 / 479, NSMS 574) A review of the current strategies involved in the design of engineered tissues and organs. The principles underlying the implementation of selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators, and culture conditions will be addressed. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring, even years}

581. Colloidal Nanocrystals for Biomedical Applications (3)

(Also offered as ECE, NSMS 581) Intended for students planning careers combining engineering, materials science, and biomedical sciences. Covers synthesis, nanocrystals characterization, biofunctionalization, biomedical nanosensors, FRET-based nanosensing, molecular-level sensing/imaging, and applications in cell biology, cancer diagnostics and therapy, neuroscience, and drug delivery.

598. Special Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

See Graduate Programs section for total credit requirements.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

See Graduate Programs section for total credit requirements. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Business Administration (BUSA)


1110 [MGMT 113]. Introduction to Business [Management: An Introduction] (3)

Fundamental concepts and terminology of business including areas such as management, marketing, accounting, economics, personnel, and finance; and the global environment in which they operate. {Fall}

1996 [MGMT 190]. Special Topics [Special Topics in Management] (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Selected offering of topics not represented in the regular curriculum. Restriction: permission of instructor.




Chemical and Biological Engineering (CBE)


101. Introduction to Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering (1)

An introduction to the professions of chemical engineering and biological engineering; current research in these fields; career choices; guidance and advice on curricular matters and effective study techniques for chemical and biological engineering students. {Fall, Spring}

213. Laboratory Electronics for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Engineers (3)

(Also offered as NE 213) Basic DC and AC circuits including capacitors and inductors and their applications in radiation measurement equipment and chemical process parameter measurements. Oscilloscopes, Op Amps, and Sensors and their use in the CBE and NE laboratories. {Spring}

251. Chemical Process Calculations (3)

Extensive problem work in material and energy balances for steady state processes. Students will utilize physical properties, chemistry and computer skills to obtain solutions. Detailed examination of case studies demonstrating the fundamentals of process analysis. Prerequisite: (CHEM 1225 or CHEM 132) and CHEM 1225L and PHYS 1310. {Fall}

253. Chemical and Biological Engineering Computing (3)

Introductory computer solutions to chemical engineering problems using MATLAB and ASPEN. Topics covered will include thermodynamic equations, transport problems, material-energy balances, staged operations, and reaction engineering. Prerequisite: 251. {Spring}

302. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3)

Principles of chemical thermodynamics and their applications to energy conversion, phase and reaction equilibrium and the calculation of thermodynamic properties. Prerequisite: 251. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

311. Introduction to Transport Phenomena (3)

The mechanisms and the related mathematical analysis of momentum and heat transport in both the molecular and turbulent regimes. Similarities and differences between transport types and the prediction of transport properties. Prerequisite: 253 and MATH **316. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

312. Unit Operations (3)

A study of the unit operations involved with momentum and heat transfer. Focus will be on the basics of equipment design and how to synthesize a process from the basic units. Includes extensive use of computer techniques and design exercises. Prerequisite: 311. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

317. Numerical Methods for Chemical and Biological Engineering (3 [2])

MATLAB application of numerical techniques to the solution of chemical engineering problems such as transport phenomena.  Included are linear/nonlinear equations; numerical integration/differentiation; regression and interpolation,; ordinary differential equations; optimization. Prerequisite: 253 and MATH **316. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

318L. Chemical Engineering Laboratory I : Introduction to Experimentation [Chemical Engineering Laboratory I] (3 [1])

Integrated lecture and laboratory. Introducing students to experimentation in Chemical Engineering. Topics include laboratory safety, experimental planning, data acquisition, sources of experimental error and uncertainty, introductory statistics, and writing reports and preparing technical presentations. Prerequisite: 253 and 302. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

319L. Chemical Engineering Laboratory II (1)

Laboratory experiments in fluids and heat transfer. Students will apply concepts of error analysis and use computational fluid dynamics software for interpretation of experimental data. Prerequisite: 311. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

321. Mass Transfer (3)

Continuation of 311. The mechanisms and the related mathematical analysis of mass transport in both molecular and turbulent regimes. Similarities and differences among mass, momentum and heat transport. Prediction of mass transport properties. Design of separation systems based on mass transfer. Prerequisite: 253 and 311. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

371. Introduction to Materials Engineering (3)

This course develops an understanding of materials from a molecular viewpoint. The structure, properties, and processing of metals, ceramics, polymers, and nanostructured materials are treated in an integrated fashion. Applications include nanotechnology, and biology. Prerequisite: 302 and 311 and 317. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

403 / 503. Heterogeneous Catalysis Seminar (2 to a maximum of 20 Δ)

Discussion of current research in heterogeneous catalysis and materials characterization. Students learn to read the literature critically and to present reviews of ongoing research. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

404 / 504. Nanomaterials Seminar (2 to a maximum of 20 Δ)

Investigate, evaluate, and discuss current frontier topics in sol-gel synthesis of nanostructured materials through a series of presentations. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

406 / 506. Bioengineering Seminar (2 to a maximum of 20 Δ)

Emerging bioengineering concepts and applications with emphasis on materials and device technologies. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

412 / 512. Characterization Methods for Nanostructures (3)

(Also offered as CHEM 469 / 569; NSMS 512) Nanostructure characterization methods. Examine principles underlying techniques and limitations, and how to interpret data from each method: electron beam, scanning probe, x-ray, neutron scattering, optical and near field optical. Lab demonstrations and projects provide experience. {Fall}

417 / 517. Applied Biology for Biomedical Engineers (3)

(Also offered as BME 517) Emphasis on engineering principles and analysis of: (i) the cell as a complete system, including cellular subsystems, structures and functions; and (ii) select higher order systems of human physiology. Prerequisite: 361 and BIOL 2110C. Restriction: permission of instructor.

418L. Chemical Engineering Laboratory III (1)

Laboratory experiments in mass transfer and unit operations. Students will plan experiments to study the operation of process equipment such as heat exchanger, distillation columns, etc. Fundamental experiments on mass transfer are also included. Prerequisite: 312 and 321. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

419L. Chemical Engineering Laboratory IV (1)

Laboratory experiments in kinetics and process control. Students will also do an in-depth project in their chosen chemical engineering concentration. Prerequisite: 454 and **461. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

447 / 547. Biomedical Engineering Research Practices (3)

(Also offered as BME 547) Students will develop research, presentation, and scientific writing skills for theses, proposals, invention disclosures and journal articles. The course includes oral presentations, case studies of research ethics, technology transfer and manuscript preparation. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

451. Senior Seminar (1)

Senior year. Reports on selected topics and surveys; presentation and discussion of papers from current technical journals, and topics of interest to chemical and biological engineers. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

454. Process Dynamics and Control (3)

Design and analysis of feedback control systems in chemical and biological systems. Topics include formulation of dynamic models, time and Laplace domain analysis of open- and closed-loop systems, design of single variable and multivariable controllers.  Prerequisite: 317. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

**461. Chemical Reactor Engineering (3)

Elementary principles of chemical reactor design and operation utilizing the kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous-catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: 311 and 317. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

472 / 572. Biomaterials Engineering (3)

(Also offered as BME 572) Introduction to biomaterials currently in use, including commercial and research applications. Includes an understanding of a material's properties, biological responses to the materials, clinical context of their use, manufacturing processes, and regulatory issues. Restriction: permission of instructor or BME graduate advisor. {Fall, odd years}

477 / 577. Electrochemical Engineering (3)

Introduction of the principles of electrochemistry and their applications in materials characterization, corrosion, electro-plating and etching. The course builds on electrochemical kinetics and discusses the design of sensors, batteries and fuel cells. Prerequisite: 302. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering. {Fall, on demand}

479 / 579. Tissue Engineering (3)

(Also offered as BME 579) A review of the current strategies involved in the design of engineered tissues and organs. The principles underlying the implementation of selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators, and culture conditions will be addressed. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring, odd years}

486 / 586. Introduction to Statistics and Design of Experiments (3 [2])

This course will introduce computational tools and statistical methods important for chemical engineering practice, including fundamental concepts of statistics, numerical statistical analysis applications and methods for the design of experiments.  Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

491 [491–492]. Undergraduate Research [Undergraduate Problems] (1-3, no limit Δ [1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ; 1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ])

Advanced studies in various areas of chemical and biological engineering. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

493L. Chemical Engineering Design (3)

Principles and practices of chemical engineering design, including process flow sheets, equipment design and specification, process modeling and simulation, economic analysis, and hazard analysis. In-depth design of at least one commercial-scale chemical process. Prerequisite: 253 and 302 and 312 and 321. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Fall}

494L. Advanced Chemical Engineering Design (3)

Continued practice in creative chemical engineering design, including safety, health and environmental issues. Detailed project on a major open-ended process design or research problem. Prerequisite: 493L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Spring}

495–496. Chemical and Biological Engineering Honors Problems I and II (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ; 1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Senior thesis for students seeking departmental honors. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ch.E. program. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

499. Selected Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

A course which permits various faculty members to present detailed examinations of developing sciences and technologies in a classroom setting. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering. {Offered upon demand}

501. Chemical and Biological Engineering Seminar (1, no limit Δ)

Colloquia, special lectures and individual study in areas of current research. A maximum of 3 credits can be applied toward degree. {Fall, Spring}

502. Chemical and Biological Engineering Research Practices (3, no limit Δ)

Students will work on developing research proposals for their masters or doctoral degree. The course will involve oral presentations of proposals and journal article critiques. {Fall}

503 / 403. Heterogeneous Catalysis Seminar (2 to a maximum of 20 Δ)

Discussion of current research in heterogeneous catalysis and materials characterization. Students learn to read the literature critically and to present reviews of ongoing research.

504 / 404. Nanomaterials Seminar (2 to a maximum of 20 Δ)

Investigate, evaluate, and discuss current frontier topics in sol-gel synthesis of nanostructured materials through a series of presentations.

506 / 406. Bioengineering Seminar (2 to a maximum of 20 Δ)

Emerging bioengineering concepts and applications with emphasis on materials and device technologies.

512 / 412. Characterization Methods for Nanostructures (3)

(Also offered as CHEM 569 / 469; NSMS 512) Nanostructure characterization methods. Examine principles underlying techniques and limitations, and how to interpret data from each method: electron beam, scanning probe, x-ray, neutron scattering, optical and near field optical. Lab demonstrations and projects provide experience.

515. Special Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

{Offered upon demand}

517 / 417. Applied Biology for Biomedical Engineers (3)

(Also offered as BME 517) Emphasis on engineering principles and analysis of: (i) the cell as a complete system, including cellular subsystems, structures and functions; and (ii) select higher order systems of human physiology. Restriction: permission of instructor.

521. Advanced Transport Phenomena I (3)

Equations of change applied to momentum, energy and mass transfer. Analogies between these phenomena and their limitations. Transport dependent on two independent variables, unsteady state problems. {Fall}

525. Methods of Analysis in Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Engineering (3)

(Also offered as NE 525) Mathematical methods used in chemical and nuclear engineering; partial differential equations of series solutions transport processes, integral transforms. Applications in heat transfer, fluid mechanics and neutron diffusion. Separation of variables eigen function expansion. {Fall}

530. Surface and Interfacial Phenomena (3)

Introduces various intermolecular interactions in solutions and in colloidal systems; colloidal systems; surfaces; interparticle interactions; polymer-coated surfaces; polymers in solution, viscosity in thin liquid films; surfactant self-assembly; and surfactants in surfaces.

542. Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3)

Advanced thermodynamics with reference to its application in chemical engineering. {Spring}

547 / 447. Biomedical Engineering Research Practices (3)

(Also offered as BME 547) Students will develop research, presentation, and scientific writing skills for theses, proposals, invention disclosures and journal articles. The course includes oral presentations, case studies of research ethics, technology transfer and manuscript preparation. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

551–552. Problems (1-3, no limit Δ; 1-3)

Advanced study, design or research either on an individual or small group basis with an instructor. Recent topics have included convective diffusion, reactor safety, inertial confinement fusion and nuclear waste management.

561. Kinetics of Chemical Processes (3)

Rate equations for simple and complex chemical processes, both homogeneous and heterogeneous. Experimental methods and interpretation of kinetic data for use in chemical reactor design and analysis. Applications to complex industrial problems. {Spring}

572 / 472. Biomaterials Engineering (3)

(Also offered as BME 572) Introduction to biomaterials currently in use, including commercial and research applications. Includes an understanding of a material's properties, biological responses to the materials, clinical context of their use, manufacturing processes, and regulatory issues. Restriction: permission of instructor or BME graduate advisor. {Fall, odd years}

575. Selected Topics in Material Science (1-3, no limit Δ)

May be counted an unlimited number of times toward degree, with departmental approval, since content varies. Credit is determined based on the content of the course. {Offered upon demand}

576. Selected Topics in Aerosol Science (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Analysis of the motion of both charged and neutral aerosol particles; molecular and convective diffusion, particle size and classification, coagulation, precipitation and particle capture, current aerosol research and instrumentation. {Offered upon demand}

577 / 477. Electrochemical Engineering (3)

Introduction of the principles of electrochemistry and their applications in materials characterization, corrosion, electro-plating and etching. The course builds on electrochemical kinetics and discusses the design of sensors, batteries and fuel cells. {Offered on demand}

579 / 479. Tissue Engineering (3)

(Also offered as BME 579) A review of the current strategies involved in the design of engineered tissues and organs. The principles underlying the implementation of selected cells, biomaterial scaffolds, soluble regulators, and culture conditions will be addressed. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring, on demand}

586 / 486. Introduction to Statistics and Design of Experiments (3 [2])

This course will introduce computational tools and statistical methods important for chemical engineering practice, including fundamental concepts of statistics, numerical statistical analysis applications and methods for the design of experiments. {Fall}

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

See Graduate Programs section for total credit requirements. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

See Graduate Programs section for total credit requirements. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Chicana and Chicano Studies (See also: CCST) (CCS)


310. Immigration and Assimilation (3)

This is a course on the historical, political and sociological dynamics that shaped the Chicana/o experience in America. A main focus will be on immigration history and the "assimilation" process, especially Mexican immigration.

320 / 520. Cine Chicano y Mundial (3)

This course explores film depictions of Chicana/o society in relation to diverse cultures of the world and their cosmovision as expressed in films. Course themes include gender, race, politics and immigration.

330 / 530. Transnational Latina Feminisms (3)

This course examines transnational feminist theories, methodologies, and praxis. Students explore how globalization affects Latin American women in the western hemisphere and the possibilities that decolonizing struggles hold for social justice and human rights.

332. Introduction to Chicana Studies (3)

(Also offered as WMST 332) This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Chicana Studies. Includes historical and contemporary research on labor, political involvement, cultural studies and feminism.

336 / 536. Chicana Feminisms (3)

Explores the history and development of Chicana Feminisms with special attention to how Chicana feminists voice their concerns and politics on a wide range of social dynamics that includes race, class, gender, sexuality, and language.

340. Mexican Civilization (3)

This course explores Méxican society through films, art, plays, music, and poems. Students will analyze historical, political and social subjects, as well as a critically appraise the oppression of women in Mexico's patriarchal society.

342. Race, Culture, Gender, Class in New Mexico History (3)

Hispano and Native perspectives of NM history begin with colonialism, military history, politics, economics, but must also consider culture, gender and class to understand the resilience of people as actors in their own history.

360 / 560. Chicano Latino Civil Rights (3)

The seminar examines Chicano Civil Rights by exploring forms of collective social action on behalf of immigration rights/reform, education rights/reform, labor rights, treaty rights, legal justice, environmental justice, veteran's rights, and political representation.

362 / 562. Chicana and Chicano Movement: El Movimiento Chicano (3)

The course examines the Chicana/o Movement beyond the 1960s Civil Rights era, exploring the precursors to the political movement, as well as the legacies of the Chicana/o movement and its effect on society and academia.

364 / 564. Raza Genders and Sexualities (3)

The course focuses on critical thinking about race, class, gender, and sexuality. Course discussions will center on questions of identity and representation and the social construction of gender and sexuality in transnational Latina/o communities.

370. Chicana and Chicano Cultural Studies (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An exploration of a variety of contemporary forms of Chicana and Chicano cultural production and the ways in which these construct and transform individual experiences, everyday life, social relations and power. 

372 / 572. New Mexico Villages and Cultural Landscapes (3)

The course explores New Mexico's cultural heritage through an examination of cultural narratives and cultural landscapes and traditions, such as plazas, salas, resolanas, matanzas, and acequia culture from the past through the present day.

374 / 574. New Mexico's Literary Landscapes and Beyond (3)

The course explores Chicano/a letters and the spoken word tradition in New Mexico and beyond. The course examines poetic traditions through a variety of forms including poetry, storytelling, singing/songwriting, and spoken word artistry.

384. Community-Based Learning in Chicana and Chicano Studies (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course offers students the opportunity to engage in community-based learning at a selected Community-Based Organization site of their choice. The course broadens student knowledge and understanding of global and local economic and social realities.

393. Topics in Chicano Hispano Mexicano Studies (3, no limit Δ)

Special topics in Chicano Hispano Mexicano Studies are interdisciplinary in nature and draw from the Humanities, Social Sciences, and the Arts. May be repeated as subject matter varies.

440 / 540. Literary Analysis of the Mexican Revolution (3)

This course examines the origins and discursive discussions of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and explores how the interpretations and memories of the Mexican Revolution shaped modern Mexico socially and culturally.

460 / 586. Chicanos and Latinos in a Global Society (3)

The course examines current theories and debates about globalization from a critical perspective. An emphasis will be placed on the study of Chicano and Latino communities in the U.S. as influenced by globalization.

480 / 580. New Approaches in Chicana and Chicano Studies (3)

The course focuses on examining the various theories and methods utilized by Chicana/o scholars during the evolution of Chicana/o Studies. The class also presents theories and methods that inform writings in Chicana/o studies.

486. Writers in the Community (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course places students into diverse community settings to work alongside students of all ages, needs, interests and abilities. Workshops will be offered in schools, community centers, homeless shelters, healthcare facilities, and other venues.

490 / 590. Advanced Seminar in Chicana and Chicano Studies (3)

Advanced seminar emphasizing synthesis of previous courses, research skills, theories and service learning in Chicana and Chicano Studies. Designed as a capstone seminar for the undergraduate and graduate program. Restriction: junior or senior standing.

493 / 593. Special Topics (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

The content of this course varies by semester but will provide an in-depth analysis of special topics related to Chicana and Chicano Studies. For course content, consult the Schedule of Classes.

495. Undergraduate Problems (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



520 / 320. Cine Chicano y Mundial (3)

This course explores film depictions of Chicana/o society in relation to diverse cultures of the world and their cosmovision as expressed in films. Course themes include gender, race, politics and immigration.

530 / 330. Transnational Latina Feminisms (3)

This course examines transnational feminist theories, methodologies, and praxis. Students explore how globalization affects Latin American women in the western hemisphere and the possibilities that decolonizing struggles hold for social justice and human rights.

536 / 336. Chicana Feminisms (3)

Explores the history and development of Chicana Feminisms with special attention to how Chicana feminists voice their concerns and politics on a wide range of social dynamics that includes race, class, gender, sexuality, and language.

540 / 440. Literary Analysis of the Mexican Revolution (3)

This course examines the origins and discursive discussions of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and explores how the interpretations and memories of the Mexican Revolution shaped modern Mexico socially and culturally.

551. Cultural Expressions in Chicana and Chicano Studies (3)

This course engages students in exploring how discourse, rhetoric, and imagery are used in addressing key humanities thematics and topics in the field.

552. Research Methods and Data Analysis (3)

This course prepares students to survey a range of qualitative and quantitative approaches, the utility of different approaches depending on theoretical perspective, and the debates in and outside the field.

560 / 360. Chicano Latino Civil Rights (3)

The seminar examines Chicano Civil Rights by exploring forms of collective social action on behalf of immigration rights/reform, education rights/reform, labor rights, treaty rights, legal justice, environmental justice, veteran's rights, and political representation.

562 / 362. Chicana and Chicano Movement: El Movimiento Chicano (3)

The course examines the Chicana/o Movement beyond the 1960s Civil Rights era, exploring the precursors to the political movement, as well as the legacies of the Chicana/o movement and its effect on society and academia.

564 / 364. Raza Genders and Sexualities (3)

The course focuses on critical thinking about race, class, gender, and sexuality. Course discussions will center on questions of identity and representation and the social construction of gender and sexuality in transnational Latina/o communities.

572 / 372. New Mexico Villages and Cultural Landscapes (3)

The course explores New Mexico's cultural heritage through an examination of cultural narratives and cultural landscapes and traditions, such as plazas, salas, resolanas, matanzas, and acequia culture from the past through the present day.

574 / 374. New Mexico's Literary Landscapes and Beyond (3)

The course explores Chicano/a letters and the spoken word tradition in New Mexico and beyond. The course examines poetic traditions through a variety of forms including poetry, storytelling, singing/songwriting, and spoken word artistry.

580 / 480. New Approaches in Chicana and Chicano Studies (3)

The course focuses on examining the various theories and methods utilized by Chicana/o scholars during the evolution of Chicana/o Studies. The class also presents theories and methods that inform writings in Chicana/o studies.

586 / 460. Chicanos and Latinos in a Global Society (3)

The course examines current theories and debates about globalization from a critical perspective. An emphasis will be placed on the study of Chicano and Latino communities in the U.S. as influenced by globalization.

590 / 490. Advanced Seminar in Chicana and Chicano Studies (3)

Advanced seminar emphasizing synthesis of previous courses, research skills, theories and service learning in Chicana and Chicano Studies. Designed as a capstone seminar for the undergraduate and graduate program.

593 / 493. Special Topics (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

The content of this course varies by semester but will provide an in-depth analysis of special topics related to Chicana and Chicano Studies. For course content, consult the Schedule of Classes.

597. Individual Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Provides graduate students with the opportunity to work one-on-one with an instructor to facilitate an intensive study of a subject or the completion of a project.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

697. Individual Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Provides graduate students with the opportunity to work one-on-one with an instructor to facilitate an intensive study of a subject or the completion of a project.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Chicana and Chicano Studies (See also: CCS) (CCST)


1110 [CCS 109]. Introduction to Comparative Global and Ethnic Societies (3)

The course explores historical and contemporary social forces that impact ethnic communities across the Americas. Students will examine social and economic dynamics of Indigenous, Latino, Asian-Pacific, Africana communities, and women's experiences.

2110 [CCS 201]. Introduction to Chicana and Chicano Studies (3)

Introductory survey of the Mexican American experience in the United States, with special reference to New Mexico. Exploration of historical, political, social, and cultural dimensions.




Civil Engineering (CE)


130. Construction Detailing (3)

Basics of construction detailing and comprehension of working drawing sets.

160L. Civil Engineering Design (3)

Introduction to engineering graphics (AutoCAD®), computer-aided design; introduction to civil engineering and construction.

171. Construction Materials and Techniques (3)

Plan reading, elementary construction techniques, materials and construction documents; primary emphasis is on the Uniform Building Code plan checking. Prerequisite: 130.

202. Engineering Statics (3)

Statics of particles and rigid bodies, in two and three dimensions using vector algebra as an analytical tool; centroids; distributed loads; trusses, frames, internal forces, friction. Prerequisite: MATH 1522 and PHYS 1310.

279. Mechanical Electrical Systems Construction (3)

Materials and equipment used in the electrical and mechanical systems of commercial building, and associated codes and costs, are surveyed and explored.

283. Surveying and Geomatics (3)

Principles of physical measurements and error theory applied to transportation systems, including layout and design. Design elements and standards, sight distance considerations and earthwork calculations applied to horizontal and vertical alignment design. Prerequisite: MATH 1430 or MATH 1512.

291. Lower Division Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Lower division studies in various areas of civil engineering.  Restriction: freshman or sophomore standing.

302. Mechanics of Materials (3)

Stresses and strains in members subjected to tension, compression, torsion, shear and flexure. Combined and principal stresses; Mohr’s circle construction; buckling. Introduction to statically indeterminate members. Prerequisite: 202. Pre- or corequisite: MATH **316. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

305. Infrastructure Materials Science (4)

Lecture and laboratory studies of the physical, structural, mechanical and chemical properties of infrastructure materials. Micro and nano-scale structure of matter. Experimental determination of material properties. Prerequisite: ENGL 2210. Pre- or corequisite: 302 or 371. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

308. Structural Analysis (3)

Analysis of determinate and indeterminate structural systems. Determination of forces and displacements. Classical analysis methods, influence lines and introduction to matrix stiffness formulation. Prerequisite: 302 and 305. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

331. Fluid Mechanics (4)

Fluid properties; fluids at rest; fluid flow principles, including continuity, energy and momentum; incompressible fluid flow; laboratory study of basic principles of fluid mechanics. Three lectures.  Prerequisite: 202 and ENG 301. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

**335. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering (3)

Basic principles of environmental and water resources engineering: material and energy balances, hydrology, water treatment and distribution, wastewater collection and treatment. Prerequisite: 331 and CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

350. Engineering Economy (3)

(Also offered as ME 350) A study of methods and techniques used in determining comparative financial desirability of engineering alternatives. Includes time value of money (interest), depreciation methods and modern techniques for analysis of management decisions. Prerequisite: MATH 1430 or MATH 1512. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

360. Soil Mechanics (4)

Fundamental properties of soils, classification systems, site investigation, permeability, consolidation, compaction and shear. Laboratory tests conducted to determine the properties of soils-related geotechnical engineering problems. Three lectures. Prerequisite: 302.  Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

370. Construction Methods and Equipment (3)

Comprehensive study of the ownership and operating costs, production rates and operating characteristics of the major construction equipment types. Prerequisite: 350. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

371. Structures for Construction (3)

Principles of mechanics, equilibrium conditions, properties of structural materials, structural properties of areas, load-shear-bending moment diagrams, flexural stresses, shearing stresses, deflection, and analysis of simple trusses, beams, columns, and funicular structures. Prerequisite: 171 and MATH 1430 and PHYS 1230. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

**372. Principles of Construction (3)

Management principles as applied to the conduct and control of a construction contracting business; estimating methods, bidding, construction contracts, bonds, insurance, project planning and scheduling, cost accounting, labor law, labor relations and safety. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

376. Cost Estimating (3)

Using modern, professional estimating techniques and resources, students complete cost estimates on buildings based on the Construction Specifications Institute formatted budgets and quantity take-offs for materials, labor, and equipment. Prerequisite: 171. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

377. Construction Scheduling (3)

Planning and scheduling of construction activities including network diagramming and calculations with the Critical Path Method (CPM), resource allocation, schedule updating, and computer applications. Prerequisite: 171. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

382. Transportation Engineering (3)

Multimodal examination of the planning, design and operation of transportation facilities; social aspects and economic evaluation of transportation system improvements; transportation design project. Prerequisite: 283. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

409. Engineering Ethics (1)

Topics in engineering practice, licensing, ethics and ethical problem-solving. Cases illustrating ethical issues facing practicing engineers. One lecture and one recitation per week for eight weeks. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

410. Structural Design I (3)

The course is designed to give the student "can-do" confidence in steel and concrete structural design. Prerequisite: 308. Restriction: admitted to B.S.C.E. Civil Engineering, B.S.Cn.E. Construction Engineering, or B.S.C.M. Construction Management.

411 / 511. Reinforced Concrete Design (3)

Structural mechanics of concrete beams, slabs, columns, walls and footings; checking and proportioning of members and connections in accordance with specifications for limit state concrete design. Prerequisite: 308. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

413 / 513. Timber and Masonry Design (3)

Design of reinforced masonry and timber structures conforming to the latest building codes and specifications; masonry assemblage methods, shear strength, masonry beams, columns and walls; wood connections, load and resistance factors for timber design. Prerequisite: 308.  Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

415. Civil Engineering Design Competition (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Students will plan, design, construct, and test projects for competitions such as the American Society of Civil Engineering/American Institute of Steel Construction steel bridge competition and the American Concrete Institute’s concrete canoe competition. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

424 / 524. Structural Design in Metals (3)

Design of steel systems in accordance with LRFD design specifications. Prerequisite: 308. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

431 / 531. Physical-Chemical Water and Wastewater Treatment (3)

Theory and design of common physical-chemical treatment processes including sedimentation, coagulation, flocculation, water softening, oxidation, disinfection, sludge handling and disposal, filtration and centrifugation. Prerequisite: **335. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

433 / 533. Environmental Microbiology (3)

Examination of the fundamental principles of microbiology and biochemistry as they apply to environmental and biochemical engineering. Topics will include microbial cell structure, metabolism, bioenergetics, ecology, molecular methods of analysis, and pollutant degradation. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

436 / 536. Biological Wastewater Treatment (3)

Principles and design of wastewater treatment systems which are dependent on biological organisms. Processes covered include suspended culture and fixed culture systems, nutrient removal, hybrid systems, land application and on-site treatment systems. Emphasis will be placed on fundamental interaction between the organisms, wastes and receiving body of water. Prerequisite: **335. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

438 / 538. Sustainable Engineering (3)

Evaluation of strategies to improve the environmental performance of industrial processes. Topics include impacts associated with resource consumption and pollution generation, life cycle assessment, environmental management systems, sustainability, techniques for pollution prevention and energy minimization. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

440 / 540. Design of Hydraulic Systems (3)

Applications of the principles of fluid mechanics to the design and analysis of pipe systems. Topics include pipe network analysis, design and selection of hydraulic machinery and analysis of transient and compressible flow. Prerequisite: 331. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

441 / 541. Hydrogeology (3)

(Also offered as EPS 462 / 562) Hydrologic and geologic factors controlling groundwater flow, including flow to wells. The hydrologic cycle; interactions between surface and subsurface hydrologic systems; regional flow systems. Groundwater geochemistry and contaminant transport. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L and MATH 1522 and PHYS 1310.  Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

*442. Hydraulic Engineering and Hydrology (3)

Design of water distribution systems and open channels; selection of pumps and turbines; hydraulics of wells; basic engineering hydrology including precipitation, infiltration, runoff, flood routing, statistical measures and water resources planning. Prerequisite: 331 and MATH 1512. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

452 / 552. Building Information Modelling (3)

Principles, theory, and techniques of computer building, information modeling applications in the construction industry using AutoDesk Revit Architecture® and Revit Structure® modeling software. Students develop and apply current database technologies based on their respective degrees. Prerequisite: 160L and 305 and (308 or 371) and (**372 or (376 and 377)). Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

*455. Engineering Project Management (3)

Estimating, proposing, planning, scheduling, quality and cost control and reporting of an engineering project. Case studies of typical engineering projects. Small projects carried out by student teams. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

462 / 562. Foundation Engineering I (3)

Application of principles of soil mechanics to analysis and design of footings, piles, caissons, cofferdams and other substructures. Prerequisite: 360. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

463. Earth Structures (3)

Analysis and design of earth dams, embankments and excavations; seepage, slope stability. Buried structures, conduits and culverts. Computer applications. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

466. Pavement Design (3)

Provides an understanding of the analysis and design of flexible and rigid highway pavements. Includes mechanistic-empirical analysis and evaluation of design practices, stresses and strains in pavements, traffic consideration, pavement performance models, and reliability. Prerequisite: 360. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

473 / 573. Construction Law (3)

Basic law concepts pertaining to the construction industry in New Mexico, including the Construction Industries Licensing Act, construction contracts, change orders, delay damages, contractor liability, dispute resolution, lien laws and the Miller Acts. Prerequisite: (**372 or (376 and 377)) and ENGL 2210. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

474 / 574. Principles of Written Construction Documents (3)

This course reviews written documents used throughout construction projects, describing how the documents relate to each other and to drawings. It provides detail on the theory, techniques and format for every aspect of construction documentation. Prerequisite: (**372 or (376 and 377)) and ENGL 2210. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

475 / 575. Construction Safety (3)

Basic safety and loss control concepts, practices, and skills to improve construction job site safety; OSHA regulations, accidents, documentation, safety policies and procedures, safe work environments, crisis management, and other safety related topics. Prerequisite: (**372 or (376 and 377)) and ENGL 2210. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

477 / 577. Project Controls (3)

Time and cost budgeting is used for project control through management information and systems engineering. Topics to include cost integrated scheduling, earned value, probabilistic estimating and scheduling, crashing, trade-off analysis and forecasting. Prerequisite: **372 or (376 and 377). Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

478 / 578. Design of Temporary Support Structures (3)

Design and construction of temporary support structures used in the construction industry, including concrete formwork, scaffolding, caissons, cofferdams, and dewatering systems. Prerequisite: 308 or 371. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

481 / 581. Urban Transportation Planning (3)

Planning aspects of highway transportation including transportation goals, transportation forecasting techniques and models, selection between alternate solutions, financing improvements. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

482 / 582. Highway and Traffic Engineering (3)

Principles of the geometric design and operation of streets and highways, including planning aspects, traffic design and control and highway safety. Application of these principles to actual situations. Prerequisite: 382. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

*491-*492. Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1-3, 1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Advanced studies in various areas of civil engineering. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

493. Special Topics in Civil Engineering - Honors (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

494. Honors Seminar (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

495. Construction Internship (1)

Practical construction industry experience (both home office and field). Students spend designated period of time with owner or contractor. Evaluation by both instructor and industry sponsor, emphasizing student’s understanding of observed project management operations. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and junior or senior standing.

497L. Design Construction Integration (3)

Comprehensive, creative construction management of a typical construction project, including estimating, scheduling, document preparation, constructibility site analysis and quality, safety, equipment and material plans. Both written and oral presentations are required. Pre- or corequisite: 477. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

499. Design of Civil Engineering Systems (3)

Comprehensive, creative design of a typical civil engineering project, including cost analysis. Detailed study based on written proposals by student teams, both written and oral reports required. To be taken in the student’s last semester. Prerequisite: 308 and 331 and 350 and 360. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and senior standing.

501. Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3)

(Also offered as ME 501) State of stress and strain at a point, stress-strain relationships; topics in beam theory such as unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, and elastic foundations; torsion of noncircular cross-sections, energy principles.

502. Finite Element Methods in Solid Mechanics (3)

Topics in finite element analysis with applications to problems in a two and three dimensional, solid continuum.

504. Fracture Mechanics (3)

This course explains principles of crack initiation propagation and the fracture process in construction materials including glass, metals, concrete and polymers.

506. Prestressed Concrete (3)

Theoretical and practical aspects of behavior and design of prestressed concrete structures.

511 / 411. Reinforced Concrete Design (3)

Structural mechanics of concrete beams, slabs, columns, walls and footings; checking and proportioning of members and connections in accordance with specifications for limit state concrete design.

513 / 413. Timber and Masonry Design (3)

Design of reinforced masonry and timber structures conforming to the latest building codes and specifications; masonry assemblage methods, shear strength, masonry beams, columns and walls; wood connections, load and resistance factors for timber design.

515. Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (3)

Design of new reinforced concrete structures using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcement and strengthening of existing reinforced and prestressed concrete structures using FRP materials.

518. Theory of Structural Stability (3)

General concept of stability of elastic and inelastic systems: columns, beam-columns, frames, plates and torsional stability. Equilibrium, energy and dynamic methods, nonlinear systems, nonconservative problems, discretized mathematical models.

521. Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering (3)

Theory of structural vibrations; response spectra for design; viscous and tuned mass damping; multi-degree-of-freedom analysis using normal mode method; designs under earthquake excitations; seismic design provisions in building codes; final design project.

524 / 424. Structural Design in Metals (3)

Design of steel systems in accordance with LRFD design specifications.

531 / 431. Physical-Chemical Water and Wastewater Treatment (3)

Theory and design of common physical-chemical treatment processes including sedimentation, coagulation, flocculation, water softening, oxidation, disinfection, sludge handling and disposal, filtration and centrifugation.

533 / 433. Environmental Microbiology (3)

Examination of the fundamental principles of microbiology and biochemistry as they apply to environmental and biochemical engineering. Topics will include microbial cell structure, metabolism, bioenergetics, ecology, molecular methods of analysis, and pollutant degradation.

534. Environmental Engineering Chemistry (3)

A comprehensive survey including acid-base and precipitation equilibria, complexation of metals, transformation occurring in the environment adsorption, ion exchange. The approach will be quantitative and aimed at developing the student's ability to predict consequences of environmental manipulation, treatment processes and phenomena observed in the field.

536 / 436. Biological Wastewater Treatment (3)

Principles and design of wastewater treatment systems which are dependent on biological organisms. Processes covered include suspended culture and fixed culture systems, nutrient removal, hybrid systems, land application and on-site treatment systems. Emphasis will be placed on fundamental interaction between the organisms, wastes and receiving body of water.

538 / 438. Sustainable Engineering (3)

Evaluation of strategies to improve the environmental performance of industrial processes. Topics include impacts associated with resource consumption and pollution generation, life cycle assessment, environmental management systems, sustainability, techniques for pollution prevention and energy minimization.

539. Radioactive Waste Management (3)

(Also offered as CBE 439/539) Introduction to the nuclear fuel cycle emphasizing sources, characteristics and management of radioactive wastes. Types of radiation, radioactive decay calculations, shielding requirements. Radwaste management technologies and disposal options.

540 / 440. Design of Hydraulic Systems (3)

Applications of the principles of fluid mechanics to the design and analysis of pipe systems. Topics include pipe network analysis, design and selection of hydraulic machinery and analysis of transient and compressible flow.

541 / 441. Hydrogeology (3)

(Also offered as EPS 562 / 462) Hydrologic and geologic factors controlling groundwater flow, including flow to wells. The hydrologic cycle; interactions between surface and subsurface hydrologic systems; regional flow systems. Groundwater geochemistry and contaminant transport.

542. Intermediate Hydrology (3)

Hydrometeorology, interception, depression storage, infiltration, hydrograph analysis, flood routing, urban hydrology, groundwater analysis and utilization.

545. Open Channel Hydraulics (3)

Open channel hydraulics; specific energy and specific force; steady and unsteady flow; gradually varied flow; rapidly varied flow; computation of water surface profiles.

547. GIS in Water Resources Engineering (3)

Principles and operation of geographic information systems using Arc GIS, work with surface and subsurface digital representations of the environment considering hydrologic and transportation processes. Course project is required.

548. Fuzzy Logic and Applications (3)

Theory of fuzzy sets; foundations of fuzzy logic. Fuzzy logic is shown to contain evidence, possibility and probability logics; course emphasizes engineering applications; control, pattern recognition, damage assessment, decisions; hardware/software demonstrations.

549. Vadose Zone Hydrology (3)

Principles and applications of water, energy and solute transport in the near-surface environment. Topics covered include moisture characteristic curves, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, Richards equation and numerical solutions. Processes studied include infiltration, redistribution, evapotranspiration and recharge.

551. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Advanced reading, analysis, design or research.

552 / 452. Building Information Modelling (3)

Principles, theory, and techniques of computer building, information modeling applications in the construction industry using AutoDesk Revit Architecture® and Revit Structure® modeling software. Students develop and apply current database technologies based on their respective degrees. Prerequisite: 160L and 305 and (308 or 371) and (**372 or (376 and 377)).

556. Soils in Construction (3)

Introduction to the nature of soils and how soil materials influence construction activities. Includes soil characteristics, properties, classification, contract documents, soils reports, embankments, excavation, foundation construction, haul roads, erosion mitigation, and dewatering.

557. Decision Making for Civil Infrastructure Systems (3)

Modeling of decision problems through analytical and simulation methods through examples from planning, design, construction and management of civil infrastructure.

558. Construction Materials (3)

An in-depth introduction on all major construction materials including steel, wood, concrete, masonry, polymers and asphalt. Introduces principles of sustainable construction materials as well as new construction materials and technologies.

562 / 462. Foundation Engineering I (3)

Application of principles of soil mechanics to analysis and design of footings, piles, caissons, cofferdams and other substructures.

565. Soil Behavior (3)

Understanding of the factors that determine and control the engineering properties of soils. Soil deposits, formation and composition; properties of the clay minerals, soil structure and fabric; and deformational behavior of soils under stresses.

566. Pavement Design (3)

Pavement design principles, including a review of methods for soil testing and characterization, base selection, subgrade stabilization and surfacing material design. Procedures for new pavement design and existing pavement testing and evaluation will be covered.

567. Foundation Engineering II (3)

Analytical and practical aspects of foundation design problems: soil improvement, foundations in difficult soils, reinforced earth walls, sheet pile walls, slurry walls, excavation and anchors.

570. Simulation and Design of Construction Operations (3)

Comprehensive study of the design and simulation of construction operations.

571. Sustainable Design and Construction (3)

Principles of sustainable design and construction, including life-cycle cost analysis, evaluation of economic and environmental impacts, state-of-the-art technology, and LEED certification.

573 / 473. Construction Law (3)

Basic law concepts pertaining to the construction industry in New Mexico, including the Construction Industries Licensing Act, construction contracts, change orders, delay damages, contractor liability, dispute resolution, lien laws and the Miller Acts.

574 / 474. Principles of Written Construction Documents (3)

This course reviews written documents used throughout construction projects, describing how the documents relate to each other and to drawings. It provides detail on the theory, techniques and format for every aspect of construction documentation.

575 / 475. Construction Safety (3)

Basic safety and loss control concepts, practices, and skills to improve construction job site safety; OSHA regulations, accidents, documentation, safety policies and procedures, safe work environments, crisis management, and other safety related topics.

576. Project Delivery Systems (3)

Defining characteristics of various project delivery systems, processes to solicit and procure those services. Responsibilities, risks and rewards for owners, designers, and contractors under various PDS.

577 / 477. Project Controls (3)

Time and cost budgeting is used for project control through management information and systems engineering. Topics to include cost integrated scheduling, earned value, probabilistic estimating and scheduling, crashing, trade-off analysis and forecasting.

578 / 478. Design of Temporary Support Structures (3)

Design and construction of temporary support structures used in the construction industry, including concrete formwork, scaffolding, caissons, cofferdams, and dewatering systems.

581 / 481. Urban Transportation Planning (3)

Planning aspects of highway transportation including transportation goals, transportation forecasting techniques and models, selection between alternate solutions, financing improvements.

582 / 482. Highway and Traffic Engineering (3)

Principles of the geometric design and operation of streets and highways, including planning aspects, traffic design and control and highway safety. Application of these principles to actual situations.

588. Master's Project (1-6)

Development of project concept, investigation of needs, initial data collection and assembly of written and field materials necessary to conduct a professional project. Exploration of alternative means to conduct the project. Prerequisite: completion of 12 credit hours of 500-level coursework. Restriction: admitted to M.S. Civil Engineering or M.Eng. Civil Engineering or M.C.M. Construction Management.

598. Selected Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

A course offered by Civil Engineering faculty which presents a detailed examination of developing sciences and technologies in a classroom setting. {Offered upon demand}

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

650. Research (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Restriction: CE majors only.

691. Graduate Seminar (1 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Community Engaged Learning and Research (CELR)


175. Introduction to Civic and Community Engagement (3)

This introductory course covers concepts for understanding civic engagement, including models of civic life through America's history, critiques of philanthropy, volunteerism, community service, public service, political activism, and public service leadership.

176. Practicum in Civic and Community Engagement (3)

This practicum course introduces students to types of civic engagement in a democracy and practices of engagement and inquiry. Students are required to complete between 8-10 hours of service with one community organization. Prerequisite: 175.

350. Community-Based Research I: Design (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Introduction to qualitative and quantitative research methods, their theoretical foundations, and appropriateness for specific community questions. Collaborating with community partners, students define a research question, and develop and pilot an approach which addresses the question. Prerequisite: 175 and 176.

351. Community-Based Research II: Implementation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course will focus on the implementation of community-based participatory research (CBPR) project during which students conduct a systematic investigation for the purposes of education and taking systematic action to resolve specific problems.  Prerequisite: 350.

375. Lobo Mentoring and Tutoring Leadership Development I (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)

The purpose of the course is to facilitate one-on-one mentoring and academic tutoring between college students and K-12 school participants focusing on increased literacy achievement for K-12 students through individualized assistance.

376. Lobo Mentoring and Tutoring Leadership Development II (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)

The purpose of the course is to facilitate one-on-one mentoring and academic tutoring between college students and K-12 school participants focusing on increased literacy achievement for K-12 students through individualized assistance. Prerequisite: 375. Restriction: permission of department.

391. Topics in Service-Learning Leadership (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Prepares students to work in service leadership positions and engage in a project that meets an identified community need with organized service to the community, emphasizing civic engagement, reflection, and application of learning.

392. Topics in Global Service-Learning Leadership (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

This pre-fieldwork course provides students a forum for critical reflection on community-driven service and is intended for any student undertaking study abroad, fieldwork, and community engagement in CELR 430. Restriction: permission of instructor.

*410. Topics in Lobo Gardens Community-Based Research (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This experiential learning course explores the intersections of gardening, sustainability and social change while engaging with local farmers and gardeners, planting and growing food, and cultivating the community gardens on campus.

*430. Advanced Research Service-Learning Field School (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Students will study specific issues, problems, or topics related to community-identified needs in any intensive field-based setting. Topics will address theoretical and practical aspects of community-based issues and may involve approved community partner organizations. Restriction: junior or senior standing.

*498. Independent Study in Research Service-Learning (1-6, may be repeated once Δ)

This course engages undergraduate students in a community-based project under faculty guidance in an approved community setting and working toward goals established in collaboration with community partners.  Restriction: junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor.

499. Community Engaged Learning and Research Capstone Seminar (3)

Students will culminate their Community Engaged Learning and Research experience working with a community partner to design, implement and present and project that demonstrates academic merit in addressing a community need. Prerequisite: 350 and 351. Restriction: permission of department.




Chemistry (CHEM)


1105 [115]. Preparation for College Chemistry [Preparation for Chemistry] (2)

A preparatory course for students who feel they are not prepared, or who do not have the prerequisite requirements for, CHEM 1215/1215L. A grade of "CR" can be used as placement into CHEM 1215/1215L. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

1106 [120]. Foundations of Chemistry (3)

This course is available to students initially enrolled in CHEM 1215 who find themselves unprepared. Designed for science majors, it provides foundational chemical concepts and prepares students to return and succeed in CHEM 1215. {Fall, Spring}

1110 [101]. Chemistry in Our Community (3)

Introduction for non-science majors to the basic chemistry required to understand scientific topics affecting our community, such as global warming, acid rain, nuclear power, plastics, drugs, and genetic engineering. {Fall, Spring}

1120C [111]. Introduction to Chemistry for Non-Majors Lecture and Laboratory [Elements of General Chemistry] (4)

One-semester course in general chemistry, especially for non-science majors in the health sciences except premedicine and medical technology. Three lectures, 3 hours demo lab/recitation.  Credit for both this course and CHEM 1215 may not be applied toward a degree program.Credit for both this course and CHEM 131 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1215Z or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>22 or SAT Math Section =>540. {Fall, Spring}

1215 [121]. General Chemistry I for STEM Majors [General Chemistry I] (3)

Introduction to the chemical and physical behavior of matter. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590. Pre- or corequisite: 1215L. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

1215L [123L]. General Chemistry I for STEM Majors Laboratory [General Chemistry I Laboratory] (1)

Introduction to basic chemical laboratory principles and techniques. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math=>25 or SAT Math Section =>590. Pre- or corequisite: 1215 or 131. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

1225 [122]. General Chemistry II for STEM Majors [General Chemistry II] (3)

Continuation of 1215. Credit for both this course and CHEM 132 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: (1215 or 131) and 1215L and (MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590). Pre- or corequisite: 1225L. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

1225L [124L]. General Chemistry II for STEM Majors Laboratory [General Chemistry II Laboratory] (1)

Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Three hours lab.  Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: ((1215 or 131) and 1215L) and (MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590). Pre- or corequisite: 1225 or 132. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

131. Principles of Chemistry (3)

Chemical and physical behavior of matter. Atomic and molecular structure and chemical periodicity. Chemical bonds, reactions and thermochemistry. Gas, liquids, solids, and materials. Organic and biochemistry. Strongly recommended for intended majors in chemical sciences and engineering. Three lectures per week. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1120C may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512 or MATH 1522 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1440 or MATH 2530 or ACT Math =>28 or SAT Math Section =>660. Pre- or corequisite: 1215L. {Fall}

132. Principles of Chemistry (3)

Chemical thermodynamics, equilibria and kinetics. Solutions. Electrochemistry. Continuation of Principles of Chemistry I. Strongly recommended for intended majors in chemical sciences and engineering. Three lectures per week. Credit for both this course and CHEM 1225 may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Prerequisite: (1215 or 131) and 1215L.  Pre- or corequisite: 1225L. {Spring}

192. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

Titles will vary. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

2120 [212]. Integrated Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (4)

Survey course interrelating the major principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry with special emphasis toward interests of students in the health sciences. Credit for both this course and CHEM **301 may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: 1120C or 1225. {Fall, Spring}

2310C [253L]. Quantitative Analysis Lecture and Laboratory [Quantitative Analysis] (4)

Theory and techniques of chemical analysis. Three lectures, 4 hours lab. Prerequisite: (1225 or 132) and 1225L. {Fall, Spring}

**301. Organic Chemistry (3)

Chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Credit for both this course and CHEM 2120 may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: 1225 or 132. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

**302. Organic Chemistry (3)

Continuation of **301. Prerequisite: **301. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

303L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1)

Teaches basic organic chemistry laboratory techniques, including separations, thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and set up of apparatus for organic synthesis. Three hours lab. Prerequisite: (1225 or 132) and 1225L. Pre- or corequisite: **301. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

304L. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1)

Teaches synthesis of organic compounds using reactions learned in CHEM **302 and spectroscopic characterization of the products. Three hours lab. Prerequisite: 303L. Pre- or corequisite: **302. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

**311. Physical Chemistry (3)

An introduction to quantum chemistry that starts from the postulates of quantum mechanics and simple models and covers structure of polyatomic molecules. Credit not allowed for **311 and **315. Prerequisite: (1225 or 132) and 1225L and MATH 1522 and (PHYS 1240 or PHYS 1320). Pre- or corequisite: MATH 2530. {Fall}

**312. Physical Chemistry (3)

An introduction to chemical thermodynamics. Topics will include basic thermodynamic principles, phase diagrams, and solution phase thermodynamics. Credit not allowed for **312 and **315. Prerequisite: (1225 or 132) and 1225L and MATH 1522 and (PHYS 1240 or PHYS 1320). Pre- or corequisite: MATH 2530. {Spring}

**315. Introductory Physical Chemistry (4)

Fundamentals of physical chemistry with primary emphasis upon biological and biochemical applications. Cannot be used for credit toward B.S. Chemistry. Credit not allowed for (**311 or **312) and **315. Prerequisite: (1225 or 132) and 1225L and (MATH 1440 or MATH 1522) and (PHYS 1240 or PHYS 1320). {Fall, Spring}

**325. Special Topics for Undergraduates (1-3, may be repeated once Δ)

Possible topics are: chemical literature, environmental chemistry, photochemistry, stereochemistry, macromolecules, C-13-NMR, natural products. {Offered upon demand}

**326. Special Topics for Undergraduates (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Possible topics are: chemical literature, environmental chemistry, photochemistry, stereochemistry, macromolecules, C-13-NMR, natural products. {Offered upon demand}

**391. Readings in Selected Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Advanced topics not covered in general offerings. {Offered upon demand}

**392. Readings in Selected Topics (1-3, may be repeated once Δ)

Advanced topics not covered in general offerings. {Offered upon demand}

411L. Laboratory Methods In Physical Chemistry (3)

Introduction to modern physical chemistry laboratory techniques including computational chemistry, quantum mechanical description of molecular rotations, molecular vibrations and electronic absorption, and thermodynamics. One lecture, 6 hrs. lab. Prerequisite: **311 and **312 and 453L. {Fall}

412. Advanced Physical Chemistry (3)

Advanced topics in physical chemistry, including statistical mechanics, reaction kinetics, chemical dynamics and transition state theory will be discussed. Prerequisite: **311 and **312. {On demand}

421. Biological Chemistry (3)

Brings the fundamentals of general and organic chemistry to bear on the complex array of structures and chemical processes that occur in living organisms. Prerequisite: **302 and (**312 or **315).

425. Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways (3)

Covers basic principles of mechanisms, acidity, stereochemistry; structures; properties of biomolecules; reactions in lipid, carbohydrate, amino acid, nucleotide metabolic pathways. (3 hrs lecture) Prerequisite: **302. {Fall, Spring}

*431. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)

Atomic theory and molecular structure, the fundamentals of symmetry, point groups, bonding concepts, acid-base chemistry, periodic trends, and reaction chemistry of both transition metals and non-metals. Prerequisite: **311 or **315. {Fall}

432L. Advanced Synthetic Chemistry Laboratory (3)

Provides students with basic laboratory techniques in synthetic, structural, mechanistic, spectroscopic, and computational chemistry. 1 hr lecture, 6 hrs lab. Prerequisite: 304L and *431. {Spring}

452. Polymer Chemistry (3)

An introduction to polymer chemistry terminology, synthesis, characterization and application. Prerequisite: **302. {Fall, Spring}

453L. Analytical Instrumentation: Theory and Application (4)

This course introduces students to a variety of instrumentation used in chemical analysis. Content includes theory, design, statistical data analysis and application of primary instrumentation used in analytical labs. Labs and research project will be performed.  Prerequisite: 2310C and (MATH 1430 or MATH 1512). {Spring}

457. Environmental Chemistry (3)

Introduction to the chemistry of natural and polluted environments, including both atmospheric and aquatic systems. Prerequisite: 2310C and **302. {Offered upon demand}

468. Chemistry and Physics at the Nanoscale (3)

Students will study chemical and physical concepts necessary to understand nanoscale materials: Quantum properties, charge confinement, and nanoscale thermodynamics, surface and interfacial forces, nanomachines and nanostructures, self-organization, and scaling. Emphasis on problem-solving skills development. {Spring}

469 / 569. Characterization Methods for Nanostructures (3)

(Also offered as CBE, NSMS 512) Nanostructure characterization methods. Examine principles underlying techniques and limitations, and how to interpret data from each method: electron beam, scanning probe, x-ray, neutron scattering, optical and near field optical. Lab demonstrations and projects provide experience. {Fall}

471. Advanced Topics in Chemistry (2-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Current topics requiring a background in physical chemistry such as spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, advanced synthesis, polymer chemistry and materials chemistry. {Offered upon demand}

495. Undergraduate Problems (1-3)

{Offered upon demand}

496. Undergraduate Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

{Offered upon demand}

497. Senior Honors Research (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

Senior paper based on independent research. {Offered upon demand}

498. Senior Honors Research (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

Senior paper based on independent research. {Offered upon demand}

*499. Chemistry Seminar-Research (1, may be repeated once Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

500. Scientific Teaching in Chemistry (1-3, no limit Δ)

A course which includes lecture, seminar, workshop and field experience to provide a scientific framework for teaching chemistry and practice in strategies of scientific teaching.

501. Molecular Structure Theory (3)

General introduction to quantum mechanics with emphasis on chemical applications. Topics covered include basic postulates of quantum mechanics, standard analytically solvable quantum systems (free electrons, particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, hydrogen atom), approximation methods (perturbation theory and the variational method). An introduction to molecular quantum mechanics, molecular spectroscopy and time-dependent perturbation theory.

504. Chemical Dynamics (3)

A rapid review of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. Usually for graduate students in areas outside of physical chemistry.

511. Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry (3)

An introduction to the methods used for determining reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry and the application of those methods for determining the mechanisms of reactions based on ionic processes.

514. Synthesis in Organic Chemistry (3)

Development of strategies for synthesizing organic compounds including stereochemical control; introduction to advanced reactions for carbon-carbon bond formation and functional group manipulation.

515. Topics in Organic Chemistry (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



516. Topics in Organic Chemistry (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



521. Biological Chemistry (3)

Brings the fundamentals of general and organic chemistry to bear on the complex array of structures and chemical processes that occur in living organisms. Prerequisite: **301 and 302 and (**311 or *315). Restriction: permission of instructor.

536. Synthesis and Mechanism in Inorganic Chemistry (3)

A general outline of synthesis methodologies and approaches for main group element and transition metal compounds is provided. In addition, the reactivity of these compounds is explored with particular emphasis on systematics in reaction mechanisms.

537. Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



538. Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



545. Topics in Analytical Chemistry (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



546. Topics in Analytical Chemistry (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



567. Topics in Physical Chemistry (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



568. Chemistry and Physics at the Nanoscale (3)

Students will study chemical and physical concepts necessary to understand nanoscale materials: Quantum properties, charge confinement, and nanoscale thermodynamics, surface and interfacial forces, nanomachines and nanostructures, self-organization, and scaling. Emphasis on problem-solving skills development. {Spring}

569 / 469. Characterization Methods for Nanostructures (3)

(Also offered as CBE, NSMS 512) Nanostructure characterization methods. Examine principles underlying techniques and limitations, and how to interpret data from each method: electron beam, scanning probe, x-ray, neutron scattering, optical and near field optical. Lab demonstrations and projects provide experience. {Fall}

587. Advanced Topics in Biological Chemistry (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

623. Research Colloquium (1, may be repeated nine times Δ)

Presentation and discussion of current research by faculty from other institutions. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

625. Chemistry Divisional Seminar (1, no limit Δ)

Student presentations and discussion of current research by students and faculty in the same traditional division of chemistry. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

627. Chemistry Instrumentation Seminar (1, may be repeated once Δ)

Training and practice in use of research instrumentation required by a student’s graduate research. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

650. Research/Readings (2-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Chinese (CHIN)


1110 [101]. Mandarin Chinese I [First Year Chinese I] (3)

Credit for both this course and CHIN 1130 may not be applied toward a degree program.

1120 [102]. Mandarin Chinese II [First Year Chinese II] (3)

Credit for both this course and CHIN 1140 may not be applied toward a degree program.

1130 [111]. Mandarin Chinese I Intensive [Beginning Chinese I] (6)

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in first year modern standard Chinese (“Mandarin”). This course is recommended for students who have had little or no experience in the Chinese language. The 1st year intensive Mandarin Chinese course is designed to introduce the Mandarin sound system (“pinyin”), basic vocabulary, and Mandarin Chinese characters (Simplified), and basic grammatical concepts and structures. In order to help beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills, the 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities) will be integrated consistently into the content and exercises in the course. Credit for both this course and CHIN 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program.

1140 [112]. Mandarin Chinese II Intensive [Beginning Chinese II] (6)

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in first year modern standard Chinese (“Mandarin”). This course is designed for students who have taken 1st Semester Intensive Mandarin Chinese, and focuses on enhancing pronunciation and expanding the vocabulary and grammar dealing with daily activities. In order to help beginners develop their communicative competence in the four basic skills, the 5Cs (Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities) will be integrated consistently into the content and exercises in the course. Credit for both this course and CHIN 1120 may not be applied toward a degree program. Prerequisite: 1130.

2110 [201]. Mandarin Chinese III [Second Year Chinese I] (3)

An integrated language course to develop oral and written proficiency to Intermediate-low level and initial cultural competency.  Prerequisite: 1140.

2120 [202]. Mandarin Chinese IV [Second Year Chinese II] (3)

Follows prerequisite to further develop oral and written proficiency up to Intermediate-mid level and initial cultural competency. Prerequisite: 2110.

301. Third Year Chinese I (3)

An integrated language course to develop oral and written proficiency up to Intermediate-high level and cultural competency. Prerequisite: 2120.

302. Third Year Chinese II (3)

Follows 301 to further develop oral and written proficiency up to advanced low-level and cultural competency.  Prerequisite: 301.

305. Intermediate Chinese Conversation (3, no limit Δ)

Designed for students who have completed three semesters of college-level study of Chinese or the equivalent. Students further develop their spoken language competency, enrich their vocabulary, and improve their cross-cultural skills. 

320. Study Abroad (3-6)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

343. Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, ENGL 343) This course surveys Chinese literature and culture from the origins of Chinese civilization to the present, with a focus on the continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern China.

370. Topics in Chinese Film (3 to a maximum of 6)

Study of Chinese history, life, and culture through an examination of films produced in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and mainland China.

401. China Today: Advanced Readings in Chinese (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This is an advanced Chinese language course. It introduces various aspects of contemporary Chinese society and culture to students through authentic Chinese reading materials. Prerequisite: 302 or 305. 

497. Undergraduate Problems (1-6, may be repeated once Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.




Communication and Journalism (CJ)


262. Radio/Television Performance (3)

Verbal and nonverbal performance and message preparation skills related to both the audio and video components of the mass media. Emphasis on fundamentals of prepared, extemporaneous and interpretive speaking for radio and television.

292. Beginning Internship in Communication and Journalism (1 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Internships and service projects for students at the lower level. Cannot have credit if already taken 492 or 495 or 496 or 497 or 498 or 499. Restriction: permission of instructor.

293. Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



300. Theories of Communication (3)

Study of the nature of communication theories and theory development, theories of meaning, information processing and influence with applications to selected communication contexts. Prerequisite: COMM 1115.

301. Communication Research Methods (3)

Quantitative and qualitative methods useful in investigation of communication processes and effects; concepts and techniques used in research design, data analysis, reporting and critically evaluating research. Prerequisite: COMM 1115.

313. EcoCultural Communication: Humans and "The Environment" (3)

Explores how culture and communication inform, shape, and shift our relations with "the environment." We consider local, regional, and global cultures and discourses, focusing on sustainability issues in human-nature relations.

314. Intercultural Communication (3)

Examines cultural influences in communication across ethnic and national boundaries. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

317. International Cultural Conflict and Community Building (3)

Cultural focus on communicative systems related to national, ethnic, gendered, class, religious, regions, corporations, and institutions. Research on mediation, intergroup dialogue, and community development focuses on three international sites.

318. Language, Thought and Behavior (3)

Examination of the influence of language on perception, evaluations, mass media, creativity and interpersonal relations. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

319. Language and Culture (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 310; LING 359) Examination of the interrelations of language and speech with other selected aspects of culture and cognition. Prerequisite: ANTH 1155 or LING 2110 or LING 301.

320. Conflict Management and Mediation (3)

Overview of communication theories of conflict and conflict-management processes, including an introduction to mediation. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

323. Nonverbal Communication (3)

Theory, analysis and practice of a variety of nonverbal messages, including body movement and appearance, vocal cues and environmental cues.

326. Gender and Communication (3)

(Also offered as WMST 326) Study of the relationship between gender and communication with specific attention to how gender affects language, verbal and nonverbal communication practices and how women’s movements have attempted to transform gendered communication practices.

327. Persuasive Communication (3)

Analysis, practice and evaluation of principles of attitude change for a variety of interpersonal and public communication situations. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

331. Argumentation (3)

Examines historical and contemporary theories of argumentation. Emphasis placed on development of effective advocacy and criticism of arguments.

332. Business and Professional Speaking (3)

Analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches common in business and professional settings.

333. Professional Communication (3)

Focuses on the written and presentation skills needed to succeed in a professional environment. Lessons emphasize writing reports and proposals, acquiring social information, social interaction skills, the influence of audience on message design and business etiquette.

334. Political Communication (3)

Focuses on the theory and practice of political communication in speech making, campaigns, debates and town meetings, as reported through the mass media and via new technologies.

337. Rhetorical Theory (3)

Historical survey of major contributors and contributions to the development of contemporary rhetorical theory.

339. Rhetoric and the Environment (3)

The course examines the ways we communicate about the environment and how this, in turn, impacts the way we view and treat the natural world.

340. Communication in Organizations (3)

Examines current theories of organizational behavior with emphasis on communication patterns and practices. Attention to superior-subordinate communication, formal and informal communication networks, authority and power.

344. Interviewing (3)

Theory and practice of interviewing for informational, journalistic, employment and decision-making purposes. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

350. Data Tools for Media Professionals (3)

Builds basic and intermediate skills in statistics, math, and data analysis as commonly used in media, journalism, and strategic communication. Skills include spreadsheet creation and analysis, database management, poll and business report analysis. Prerequisite: COMM 2135.

360. Video Journalism (3)

Covers the fundamentals of journalistic film and video shooting, editing, and sequencing. Introduces basics of news packages.  Prerequisite: COMM 2185.

361. Photojournalism (3)

Camera reporting, color photography, weekly news assignments, scaling photos for reproduction and advanced black and white darkroom techniques. Restriction: admitted to B.A. Communication or B.A. Journalism and Mass Communication.

363. Journalism and New Technologies (3)

Explores trends in emerging media technologies, from recent past to near future, to prepare students for our shifting media landscape. Investigates media as technological phenomena with social and economic imperatives and impacts. Prerequisite: COMM 2135.

365. History of Media (3)

The course will explore the development of communication media in the United States and the social and cultural contexts within which media emerged and evolved over time. Pre- or corequisite: COMM 1140 and (MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202). 

367. Social Media for Journalists [Social Media] (3)

Explores journalistic uses of social media, across various platforms, including developing story ideas, publishing news, creating multimedia content, measuring audience engagement, tracking online trends, and developing online personal or news organization branding. Prerequisite: COMM 2135. Pre- or corequisite: COMM 2190.

370. Audio Journalism (3)

Students will learn how to use journalism practices and ethics to record and edit audio, voice scripts, and produce various audio story formats including newscast spots, Q&As, vox pops, podcasts, postcards, and features. Prerequisite: COMM 2135.

373. Magazine Writing (3)

The process of writing and marketing fiction and non-fiction for magazines.

374. Design and Visual Presentation I (3)

Introduction to print design through the study of visual communication, principles of design, elements of design and practical application of those principles and elements in various forms of print collateral. Use of Adobe InDesign.

375. Intermediate Reporting (3)

Emphasis on reporting public affairs, the news feature story, developing and covering beats, and computer-assisted reporting. Prerequisite: COMM 2190.

376. Media Management (3)

This course is designed to provide insights into the management and ownership aspects of running a media company. Attention will be given to leadership skills and the complex operations of media companies.

387. Introduction to Strategic Communication (3)

A writing-intensive course with emphasis on history, practice, ethics, professional opportunities, and challenges of the field. Strong emphasis on understanding contemporary global strategic communication perspectives and diversity issues. Prerequisite: 327 and 374 and COMM 1140 and MATH 1350.

389. Creative Concepts (3)

Focuses on theories, strategies and practices in developing visuals/copy across the media. Provides the formats/structure to write, design and produce collateral pieces and promotional events utilizing conceptual and creative thinking. Prerequisite: 387.

390. Strategic Writing (3)

A specialized course in strategic writing, including creating material in strategic communication subfields of public relations, advertising, and integrated marketing communication, with emphasis on writing for outlets including print and broadcast media and the Internet. Prerequisite: 387.

391. Strategic Social Media (3)

Focuses on social media strategy, selection, and content development for use in targeted communication efforts by businesses and non-profit organizations. Emphasis placed on critical analysis and strategic use of a variety of social media platforms. Prerequisite: 387.

393. Topics in Communication and Journalism (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



400. Senior Seminar: Perspectives on Communication (3)

In this capstone course, seniors assess the theories, concepts and skills learned throughout their communication major and apply them to real-world situations as well as to the fulfillment of professional, personal and social goals. Prerequisite: 300 and 301 and (332 or 333).

413. Studies in Intercultural Communication (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Intensive study of theory and research in intercultural communication concerning interactions between members of specific cultures chosen by the instructor. Content varies from semester to semester, may be repeated with different content. Prerequisite: 314.

421. Communication and Relationships (3)

Advanced analysis of theories and research in interpersonal communication with emphasis on communication processes, relational development and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: COMM 2120.

*435. Legal Communication (3)

Using historical trials as case studies, the course investigates the various communicative functions of litigation including media coverage, opening statements, direct and cross-examination, closing arguments, judge’s instructions and appellate arguments.

*438. Communicating Community, Food, and Change: Lobo Gardens (3)

This course introduces and experientially explores the theoretical lenses of environmental communication, culture, sustainability, and restorative change through collaborative hands-on student preservation and growth of community food gardens.

443. Topics in Organizational Communication (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Intensive study of one area of theory and research in organizational communication chosen by the instructor, e.g., conflict and negotiation, information technology, organizational cultures. Content varies from semester to semester; may be repeated with different content. Prerequisite: 340.

446. Organizational Analysis and Training (3)

Identification and analysis of communication problems in organizations. Attention to problems and requirements of communication training and development in organizational settings.

450. Health Communication (3)

Concepts and strategies for preventive health communication in such contexts as provider-patient interaction, health campaigns, social marketing, health images in the mass media and communication in health care organizations.

460. Broadcast News II (3)

Continuation of CJ 360. Students create longer, more elaborate programs with their own documentary segments, essays and in-studio interviews. Prerequisite: 360.

461. Media Criticism (3)

Evaluation of radio/television programming content from the perspective of the journalistic and academic critic. Examination of theoretical issues and production elements as they affect programming genres.

463. Topics in Mass Communication (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Intensive study of one area of theory and research in mass communication chosen by the instructor, e.g., rating systems, programming, economics, regulation, social effects. Content varies from semester to semester; may be repeated with different content.

464. Multimedia Production (3)

Longer form multimedia journalism emphasizing advanced production and journalism techniques. Prerequisite: 360.

469. Multiculturalism, Gender and Media (3)

(Also offered as WMST 469) Exploration of how gender, race, class, sexual orientation, ethnicity and other social positions affect media coverage, portrayals, production and reception. The course focuses on theories, methods of analysis and topics of current interest.

475. Advanced Multimedia Journalism (3)

Emphasis on multimedia reporting. The creation and maintenance of a news Web site. The understanding of software, in-depth reporting, and multimedia platforms to produce news information in all forms. Prerequisite: 360 and 375.

478. Media Theory and Research (3)

Introduces media theories in the context of professional research settings. Covers media content research conducted for political purposes and advertising, PR and media firms. Prerequisite: COMM 2135 and (MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202).

488. Strategic Planning and Campaign Development (3)

Capstone. Focuses on applying theories/principles/practices in a team environment. Emphasis placed on strategic planning, research, and creative development. Students work with actual clients to pitch their strategic and campaign plans.  Prerequisite: 389 and 390 and 391.

490. Undergraduate Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: permission of department chairperson.

*491. Internship in Communication Education (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Review of recent developments in course content, teaching materials and instructional strategies; simulated classroom experience with analysis of teaching behavior using media. Restriction: permission of department chairperson.

492. Internship in Communication (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Internships in communication arranged with individual faculty members. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 2.5 overall GPA and completion of 9 hours in CJ, to include at least one 300-level course. Six hours maximum of any CJ internship credit is allowed. Restriction: permission of instructor.

494. Senior Thesis (3)



495. Internship in Strategic Communication (1-3 to a maximum of 6 in all CJ internships Δ)

Internships in strategic communication arranged with individual faculty members. Maximum of 3 credit hours per semester. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 2.5 overall GPA and 9 credit hours in CJ to include at least one 300-level course. Restriction: permission of instructor.

496. Internship in Multimedia Journalism (1-3 to a maximum of 6 in all CJ internships Δ)

Internships in multimedia journalism arranged with individual faculty members. Maximum of 3 credit hours per semester. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 2.5 overall GPA and 9 credit hours in CJ to include at least one 300-level course. Restriction: permission of instructor.

500. Foundations of Communication Theory (3)

Survey and analysis of concepts, models and perspectives in the development of theories of communication; attention to philosophical, critical, historical and scientific bases for the study of communicative processes. Required of all M.A. students.

501. Foundations of Communication Research (3)

Introduces contemporary critical and cultural studies from a historical perspective. Analysis and criticism of cultural practices, including discourse, allocation of resources, political interests, and the structural organization of society.

502. Special Topics in Communication (1-6, no limit Δ)

Intensive study of selected relevant subjects in communication focusing on one area of theory, research, methods, or combinations thereof. Content varies depending on instructor.

506. Critical and Cultural Studies (3)

Explores critical and cultural studies theories and methods to understand and apply analysis of texts (from media and everyday spoken texts to the body and environment) in order to reveal cultural productions and transformative possibilities. 

507. Introduction to Quantitative Methods [Quantitative Data Analysis] (3)

This course is designed to help students build basic understanding about quantitative research methods, develop skills to design and implement empirical quantitative research, and conduct univariate, bivariate, and multivariate data analyses (t-test, Chi-square test, ANOVA). 

509. Ph.D. Professional Seminar (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Develops a range of professional competencies by focusing on a particular topic, such as presenting and publishing research, landing the academic job, ethics, research funding, and attaining and maintaining academic-life balance. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Communication or Ph.D. Communication.

514. Seminar: Intercultural Communication (3)

An overview of the trajectory of theory and research in intercultural communication, which includes questions and critiques of diversity in and across local, national, and global contexts. 

517. Culture, Identities and Subjectivities (3)

An overview of theory and research in culture, identities, and subjectivities with special emphasis on the faculty member's expertise, which may include: nationality, race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, class, multivocality, intersectionality, positionality, agency, etc.

518. Culture, Places and Spaces (3)

An overview of theory and research in culture, places, and spaces with special emphasis on the faculty member's expertise, which may include: transnationalism and globalism, migration, borderlands, social activism and change, sustainability, etc. 

519. Topics in Intercultural Communication (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Intensive study of theory and research in one area of intercultural communication chosen by the instructor. Content varies from semester to semester, may be repeated with different content.

535. Seminar: Argumentation (3)



550. Health Communication (3)

Concepts and strategies for preventive health communication in such contexts as provider-patient interaction, health campaigns, social marketing, health images in the mass media and communication in health care organizations.

552. Topics in Health Communication (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Intensive study of theory and research in one area of health communication chosen by the instructor. Content varies from semester to semester, may be repeated with different content.

553. Health Communication Campaigns (3)

Focuses on the design, implementation and evaluation of communication programs for addressing health issues. Provides an overview of relevant theory and research and opportunities to study, design, implement, and evaluate actual health communication campaigns.

555. Culture, Disparities, and Health Communication (3)

Covers the influence of culture on health beliefs, values, and health care practices. How beliefs and values impact communication in health care settings.

566. Media Theories (3)

Surveys theories dealing with the production, content, and reception of mediated communication. Analyzes the theories and their metatheoretical assumptions in light of their structural/functional, cultural/critical, behaviorist/effects, and postmodern paradigmatic characteristics. 

567. Digital and Social Media (3)

This course critically examines the central role digital/social media technologies play in culture and society, providing the structures in which individual identity forms, social relations manifest, political discourse occurs, and economic power flows. 

568. Political Economy of Media (3)

The course explores the power relations, structures, and social/cultural practices that mutually constitute the production, distribution, and consumption of mediated content. 

569. Media, Culture, and Society (3)

Focuses on key theoretical debates that have shaped the field of media studies, with emphasis on application to the critique of mediated communication and technological trends and their impact on society, culture, and identity construction. 

584. Teaching Communication for Communication and Journalism Teaching Assistants (1)

This course is designed to train and support Communication and Journalism graduate teaching assistants. Through a variety of workshops we engage techniques that facilitate innovative instruction and practice, mentoring skills, and ongoing pedagogical development. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Communication or Ph.D. Communication.

592. Intercultural Engagement Project (3 to 6, may be repeated once Δ)

A student-instructor arranged intercultural immersion experience featuring grounded learning, collaborative research and service, or similar meaningful interactions with people from a culture or subculture different from one's own, with "intercultural" defined broadly. Restriction: permission of instructor.

593. Graduate Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Independent study on questions and issues beyond those covered by regularly approved seminars. Plan must be prepared and approved by a faculty member who agrees to direct the study. Approval by department chairperson required.

595. Special Topics (3)



598. Master's Project (1-6)

Plan II students only. Having registered for the project plan, the student must continue to register for a minimum of 1 hour of 598 during each regular semester (exclusive of summer) until the project is completed and approved. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of advisor.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Plan I students only. Having registered for the thesis plan, the student must continue to register for a minimum of 1 hour of 599 during each regular semester (exclusive of summer) until the thesis is approved. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

600. History and Philosophy of Communication (3)

Advanced study of the modern history and philosophical foundations of the study of human communication with attention to contributions of both humanistic and social science traditions and consideration of contemporary controversies concerning theory and research.

602. Theorizing Culture and Communication (3)

Reviews historical and contemporary theorizing and research programs addressing cultural and intercultural communication.

604. Survey of Qualitative Research Methods (3)

Introduction to history, assumptions, logic, and methods of qualitative inquiry, with emphasis on field methods of data collection. 

605. Qualitative Research Design and Analysis (3)

Approaches and techniques for the analysis of qualitative data. Explores the relationships among paradigm, theory, method, and interpretation. Focuses on research design and human-subject protection as well as data analysis. 

606. Qualitative Methods Practicum (3)

The steps of the qualitative research process from conceptualization of research questions to the production of a written report. Synthesization of the various stages of communication research.

607. Advanced Quantitative Research Methods [Communication Research Methods: Quantitative] (3)

This course is designed to help students understand the principles of statistical analysis, develop statistical techniques to conduct complex multivariate analyses (multiple regression, mediation, moderation, path analysis), and conduct communication research with advanced data analyses. 

609. Mixed Methods Research Designs (3)

Introduces the students to mixed methods research, including designs for data collection, analysis and integration. Prerequisite: 501.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Having registered for the dissertation, the student must continue to register for a minimum of 1 hour of 699 during each regular semester (exclusive of summer) until the dissertation is completed and approved. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of advisor.




Clinical Science (CLNS)


501. Foundations of Medical Science (6)

Foundations of Medical Science focuses on the genetic, molecular and cellular principles required for the study of the rest of the MD Phase I curriculum. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

502. Musculoskeletal, Skin and Connective Tissue (6)

The Musculoskeletal, Skin and Connective Tissue Block that focuses on basic anatomical concepts, the normal anatomy and development of back and extremities, structure and function of skin and the pathophysiology of disorders effecting these systems. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

503. Hemotology (6)

The Hematology Block focuses on basic principles of hematology and hemostasis. This course builds on earlier FMS concepts in the consideration of the impact of diseases of the circulating elements of blood. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

509. Cardiovascular-Pulmonary-Renal (6)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

510. Human Sexuality and Reproduction (1-10)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

513. Neurosciences (1-10)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

516. GI-Endocrine (6)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

517. Doctoring V: Transitions (8)



522. Doctoring III: Practical Immersion Experience (4)



537. Health of New Mexico (3)

This course provides transformational learning experiences for entering health professional students that create a conceptual framework for understanding health and illness from a socio-ecological perspective. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

549. Infectious Disease (1-10)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

551. Doctoring I: Laying the Foundation for Clinical Practice (4)

Student introduction to being a clinical practitioner.  Learn the basic techniques that clinicians use to forge the clinician-patient relationship, and learn the communication and examination techniques used to obtain essential information about the patient. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

552. Doctoring II: Stepping into Roles and Exploring Perspectives (4)

Introduction to healthcare in two different settings: a primary care clinic and a community healthcare center. Observation and practice patient evaluations under mentorship of primary care physician. Development of written documentation encounter skills. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

553. Doctoring IV (4)

This course supports students in their clinical role in Continuity Clinic while simultaneously preparing them for clerkships and nurturing their professional identity formation. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

561. Clinical Reasoning I (4)

A block-integrated curriculum designed to explicitly model the clinical reasoning process; and to provide structure, guidance and assessment for self-directed learning, critical judgment skills, and medical problem-solving during block relevant case associations. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

562. Clinical Reasoning II (4)

A block-integrated curriculum designed to 1) explicitly model the clinical reasoning process 2) provide structure, guidance and assessment for self-directed learning, for critical judgment skills, and medical problem solving during block relevant case associations. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

563. Clinical Reasoning III (4)

Students will actively engage in the clinical reasoning process. Students will be provided structure in in self-directed learning and skills in critical judgment and medical problem solving. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

571. Quantitative Medicine I (2)

Quantitative Medicine is designed to prepare students to understand and critically evaluate medical information based on epidemiology, biostatistics, Evidence-Based Practice, and other subjects. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

572. Quantitative Medicine II (2)

Quantitative Medicine is designed to prepare students to understand and critically evaluate medical information based on epidemiology, biostatistics, Evidence-Based Practice, and other subjects. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

573. Quantitative Medicine III (2)

Quantitative Medicine is designed to prepare students to understand and critically evaluate medical information based on epidemiology, biostatistics, Evidence-Based Practice, and other subjects. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.D. program.

600. Medicine Clerkship (8)



650. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship (8)



675. Pediatrics Clerkship (8)

This supervised pediatric clerkship focuses on the development of skills in the health care of pediatric and adolescent patients.

700. Neurology Clerkship (4)



725. Psychiatry Clerkship (4)



750. Surgery Clerkship (8)



775. Family Practice (8)






Classics (CLST)


1110 [107]. Greek Mythology (3)

Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies. All texts will be in English. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

2110 [204]. Greek Civilization (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Greece. Lectures on Greek art, history, literature and philosophy. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

2120 [205]. Roman Civilization (3)

An interdisciplinary introduction to ancient Rome. Lectures on Roman literature, history, art and philosophy. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

314. The Classical Tradition I (3)

A survey of the classical tradition and its influence on western civilization from the perspective of ancient Greek culture and literature.

315. The Classical Tradition II (3)

A survey of the classical tradition and its influence on western civilization from the perspective of ancient Roman culture and literature.

319. Sex and Gender in Ancient Religion (3)

(Also offered as RELG 319) This course examines issues pertaining to gender and sexuality in ancient Mediterranean religions and cultures, with special attention paid to Greco-Roman religion, Judaism, and Christianity.

320. Magic in Ancient Religion (3)

(Also offered as RELG 320) This course examines the perception and reality of magic in the ancient Mediterranean world by examining relevant texts, spells, and relics to situate it within the practice of ancient religion.

321. Apocalypse in the Ancient World (3)

(Also offered as RELG 321) This course examines the development of the genre of apocalypse by reading several early Jewish apocalypses before examining the lasting influence of apocalypticism in one particular Jewish sect, Christianity.

*333. Topics in Latin Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as COMP *333) Study of individual authors, genres or periods of Latin literature and culture in translation.

*334. Topics in Greek Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as COMP *334) Study of individual authors, genres and periods of Greek literature and culture in translation.

497. Undergraduate Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 9 Δ)



498. Reading and Research for Honors (3)

Open only to juniors and seniors approved for departmental honors. Senior thesis based on independent research.

499. Honors Essay (3)

Open only to seniors enrolled in departmental honors. Restriction: permission of instructor.

500. Theory and Methodology of Classical Studies (3)

This course is designed teach standard research skills, research methods, and tools of the discipline, as well as introduce the various subdisciplines and related fields that constitute the study of the ancient world.




Communication (COMM)


1115 [CJ 101L]. Introduction to Communication (3)

This survey course introduces the principles of communication in the areas of interpersonal, intercultural, small group, organizational, public speaking, and mass and social media.Two hours lecture, 1 hour lab.

1130 [CJ 130]. Public Speaking (3)

This course introduces the theory and fundamental principles of public speaking, emphasizing audience analysis, reasoning, the use of evidence, and effective delivery. Students will study principles of communication theory and rhetoric and apply them in the analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches, including informative, persuasive, and impromptu speeches. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

1140 [CJ 171L]. Introduction to Media Writing (3)

This course combines a theoretical foundation with practical applications. It provides an introduction to journalism, as well as an overview of the most common types of writing required in public relations, advertising and strategic communication. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202.

1145. Sex, Lies, and Fake News: How to Use Media Wisely (3)

Helps students recognize crucial distinctions in media content between truth and rumor, news and advertising, fact and opinion, bias and fairness. Emphasizes responsible and ethical decision making in consuming and producing media.

1150 [CJ 110]. Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

This course introduces students to the history, models, theories, concepts, and terminology of mass communication, focusing on various media and professions. The course will enable students to develop media literacy skills to interpret mass communication and understand the effects of media on society and their lives.

1155 [CJ 115]. Communication Across Cultures (3)

An introduction to communication among people from different cultural backgrounds, emphasizing intercultural relations. The class seeks to identify, honor and enhance the strengths of different cultural perspectives.

2120 [CJ 221]. Interpersonal Communication (3)

This course provides an introduction to the study of interpersonal communication. Students will examine the application of interpersonal communication in personal and professional relationships. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

2130 [CJ 268]. Media Theories (3)

Introduces students to a variety of media theories and models. Focuses on the key issues in media theory, including the nature of mass media, influences on human behavior, and the media as reflector and creator of society.

2135 [CJ 466]. Media Ethics and Law (3)

Intersection of journalism and mass communication with society and its ethical standards and laws. Focus on news media and ethical and legal issues in advertising, public relations and management. Prerequisite: 1140. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202. 

2140 [CJ 225]. Small Group Communication (3)

Explores the principles and practices of effective participation in small groups, with emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving, organizational skills, role theory, conflict resolution, and creative decision-making methods. It combines a theoretical foundation with practical application to help students better understand the dynamics of group communication in both professional and social contexts.

2150 [CJ 220]. Communication for Teachers (3)

This course will investigate and critically evaluation the influence of identity, communication, and culture on instruction, learning, engagement, classroom community, and the teacher-student relationship.

2185 [CJ 269]. Multimedia and Visual Communication (3)

This course is an exploration of visual images in mass media. It emphasizes the visual world and promotes visual literacy by helping students to decipher the language of pictures through studying history, technique and imagery. Students will work in the field and in the lab to create visual projects that communicate ideas and concepts clearly. This class will prepare students to work across technology platforms to produce publication quality multimedia stories and projects. Prerequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202. Pre- or corequisite: 2135.

2190 [CJ 278]. Writing and Editing for Multimedia Journalism (3)

Continuation of COMM 1140. This course builds on the skills you have learned, focusing more deeply on the theory and practice of journalism in the digital age. Classes are in a lecture/discussion format, with emphasis on participation by students. We will practice strict adherence to deadlines, writing under pressure sometimes, rewriting, peer editing of stories, constructive criticism, coaching and teamwork. Students will hone skills in grammar, accuracy, attribution, interviews and story structure. We will also study what constitutes a compelling and well-reported, well-written news story — and the multimedia possibilities that go hand- in-hand with such stories. Prerequisite: MATH 1130 or MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1350 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512 or MATH 2118 or UHON 202. Pre- or corequisite: 2135.

2245 [CJ 279]. Web Design (3)

This course introduces web page and web design concepts, basic HTML coding skills progressing to the use of Dreamweaver to design a website. Students will gain practical experience in the production of an electronic information delivery product. This course assumes that you already have basic skills as a journalist, and will focus on helping you transfer your skills to the online format. Competency with personal computers required.




Comparative Literature (COMP)


222. Fairy and Folk Tales (3)

An exploration of fairy and folk tales from a variety of cultures. The course introduces methods of analysis while exploring historical and contemporary roles and interrelationships of the tales. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

224. Literary Questions (3)

Examination of basic questions in comparative literature studies: themes, movements, modes, interaction of literature with other disciplines, etc.  Work will be comparative and reading list will represent a cross-section of Western European, American, Russian and Classical literatures. Titles will vary as content varies. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

306. Arthurian Legend and Romance (3)

(Also offered as ENGL 306) Comprehensive study of the Arthurian Legend from its Celtic origins, to its medieval French romance continuators, and its English apex in Malory. May also trace post-medieval versions in art, print, and film.

330. Topics in Comparative and World Literature (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL 330) Study of special topics in Comparative and World Literatures, including studies of genre, period, literary movements and themes.

331. Topics in Asian Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL 331) Study of the culture and literatures of India, China, Japan and other Asian traditions. Topics vary.

332. Topics in African Literature and Culture in Translation (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL 332) Study of the culture and literatures of Africa. Topics vary.

*333. Topics in Latin Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as CLST, ENGL *333) Study of individual authors, genres or periods of Latin literature and culture in translation.

*334. Topics in Greek Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as CLST, ENGL *334) Study of individual authors, genres and periods of Greek literature and culture in translation.

335. Topics in French Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL, FREN 335) Study of individual authors, genres and/or periods of French and Francophone literature and culture.

336. Topics in German Literature and Culture in Translation (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL, GRMN 336) Study of individual authors, genres, and/or periods of German literature and culture in translation. May only be taken twice for the German major and once for the German minor. 

337. Topics in Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL, ITAL 337) Study of individual authors, genres, and/or periods of Italian literature and culture in translation.

338. Topics in Russian Literature and Culture in Translation (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL, RUSS 338) Study of individual authors, genres, and/or periods of Russian literature and culture in translation.

339. Topics in Japanese Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL, JAPN 339) Study of individual authors, genres and/or periods of Japanese literature and culture in translation.

340. Topics in Continuity and Change in Russian Culture (3-6, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as RUSS 340) Topics will deal with individual authors, genres, periods or themes. All repeated courses require approval from graduate advisor.

341. Introduction to Premodern Japanese Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

(Also offered as ENGL, JAPN 341) An introduction to Japanese literature and culture from the 8th to 19th century, this course focuses on major literary works and performance genres in their historical context.

342. Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

(Also offered as ENGL, JAPN 342) This course is an introductory exploration of the literature and culture of modern Japan, from the mid-19th century to the present day. Students will critically read a selection of modern prose narratives and poetry.

343. Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture in Translation (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

(Also offered as CHIN, ENGL 343) This course surveys Chinese literature and culture from the origins of Chinese civilization to the present, with a focus on the continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern China.

345. The Supernatural in Japanese Fiction, Folklore and Drama (3)

(Also offered as ENGL, JAPN 345) Survey of Japanese mythology, folklore, drama and fiction from 1000 CE to the present with a focus on the cultural significance of ghosts, monsters, spirit possession and otherworldly encounters.

432. Topics in Literature and Culture (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL, FREN 432) Varying topics in the practice and theory of literatures and cultures.

453. Asian Studies Thesis (3)

(Also offered as HIST, PHIL, POLS, RELG 453) Supervised research in one or more disciplines leading to an undergraduate thesis for the major in Asian Studies.

*480. Seminar in Comparative Literature (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Seminar will deal with individual authors, genres or periods in two or more literatures. Reference to other subjects. {Spring}

497. Undergraduate Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

498. Research for Honors (3)

Open to juniors and seniors approved by the Honors Committee. Restriction: permission of instructor.

499. Honors Thesis (3)

Open only to seniors enrolled for departmental honors. Prerequisite: 498. Restriction: permission of instructor.

500. Introduction to Graduate Study in Comparative Literature (3)



551. Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

For M.A. candidates. One problems course may be applied to degree. Requires advisor or chairperson approval.

580. Seminar in Modern Languages and Literatures (1-6, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as MLNG 580) One problems course may be applied to degree. Requires advisor or chairperson approval.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Counselor Education (COUN)


110. Introduction to Human Services (3)

This course provides a broad overview of the human services field. Students will be exposed to the broader mission of the human services professions, as well as trace its development across history.

120. Introduction to Helping Skills (3)

This course introduces students to fundamentals of the helping process for application in a variety of professional settings.

210. Introduction to Group Dynamics (3)

Explores the various stages of groups, including pre-group assessment and screening of group members, group development, the initial stage, the transition stage, the working stage, and the ending stage of groups.

220. Life Designing and Career Development in Human Services (3)

Provides a practical and theoretical foundation for understanding the life design paradigm. Career development theories, occupational and educational information, life balance and decision-making processes, and career and life design techniques for working in the field.

310. Harm Reduction and Crisis Intervention (3)

This course will introduce the harm reduction paradigm as a crisis-oriented public health model. Students will gain an understanding of the role of harm reduction strategies, and crisis interventions in public health.

320. Introduction to Veterans' Issues in Counseling (3)

Students will examine multiple issues facing military veterans, including the implications of these issues as they pertain to the types of support offered across the various helping professions.

330. LGBTQ Issues in Education and Human Services (3)

For students preparing for careers in educational or human services fields, the goal of this course is to increase competency in working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning persons in accordance with ethical guidelines.

492 / 592. Workshop in Counseling (1-4 to a maximum of 13 Δ)



493. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)



510. Professional Orientation and Ethics (3)

Contemporary issues, trends, and ethical considerations in counseling are reviewed and critiqued. Provides an overview of the helping profession, history, professional roles, organizations, ethical and professional preparation standards, credentialing, and public policy issues. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

513. Career Counseling (3)

A practical and theoretical foundation for understanding the relationship of personal and career development theories to counseling practice. Includes vocational choice theory, lifestyle choices, occupational and educational information, decision making processes and career exploration techniques. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

515. Testing and Assessment in Counseling (3)

Aimed at helping counselors evaluate, administer and interpret psychological tests. Includes history, ethics, sources of information, study of test manuals and the development of skill in test interpretation. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 584 and (EDPY 500 or 505) and (EDPY 502 or 511). Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

516. Crisis, Disaster and Trauma Counseling (3)

Introduction to the crisis, disaster, and trauma counseling. Topics include theories, presenting issues, assessments, interventions, and referrals. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 576 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

517. Theories of Counseling and Human Behavior (3)

Examination and analysis of major counseling and human behavior theories and their application. Consideration of philosophical bases and ethical implications. Treatment strategies and goals of each theory. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

518. Group Counseling (3)

An introductory course in group counseling. Topics include group organization, types of groups, stages of group development, communication, group roles, feedback, diagnosing and problems in the group process. Prerequisite: 510 and 517. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

519. Group Counseling Internship (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An experience in working directly with clients in a group setting with supervision provided by program faculty. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 522 and 584 and 590. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

521. Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3)

An introduction and orientation to the community model. Roles, responsibilities and functions of the community mental health counselor are examined. Knowledge and strategies designed to create systemic changes in clients’ social environment are presented. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

522. Communication Skills in Counseling (3)

Designed to introduce the student to basic communication skills fundamental to the interviewing process. Skills will be approached with a practical application to the counseling setting. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

525. Experiential Counseling (3)

Emphasizes experiential activities in counseling. This course presents an approach which incorporates academic cognitive skills, group counseling skills and experiential skills. It combines cognitive behavioral, group and humanistic counseling methods in experiential learning.

541. Counseling Children and Adolescents (3)

This course addresses the developmental issues and psychological concerns of infants, elementary school-aged children and adolescents and provides knowledge about appropriate therapeutic interventions for this population. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 584 and (EDPY 503 or FCS 503). Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

545. School Counseling (3)

School counseling as a profession is addressed. Roles and responsibilities of school counselors at various educational levels are described. Professional, ethical, legal, multicultural and family issues as they impact school counselor role are included. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

560. Family Counseling (3)

An introduction to history and practice of counseling with families. A number of leading experts in the field will be studied with respect to their theoretical approach to the subject as well as their techniques. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

576. Diagnosis of Mental Disorders (3)

A comprehensive overview of physiological aspects of behavior which may impact the counseling process. Emphasis will be placed on psychopathology and diagnosis in accordance with the DSM and ICD. Prerequisite: two from 510 and 517 and 518 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

577. Substance Use and Abuse (3)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the biological, psychological, and social factors contributing to substance use, abuse, and dependency. Assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, and the role of the counselor will be discussed. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 576 and 584.

581. Sexuality in Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)

Broadly based examination of psychological, biological and social aspects of sexuality with emphasis on the professional’s own values, attitudes and knowledge in working with clients with sexual concerns and problems. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

584. Multicultural Issues in the Helping Professions (3)

Provides fundamentals in multicultural competence useful in human service and educational settings. Working effectively with multicultural families requires self awareness, knowledge of information specific to various cultures and the development of skills for successful interaction. Prerequisite: Two from 517, 518, 520, 530. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

590. Practicum in Counseling (3)

An experience providing counseling services to diverse clients in an on-campus setting where supervision is provided by program faculty and doctoral students under faculty supervision. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 522 and 584. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

591. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



592 / 492. Workshop in Counseling (1-4 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



593. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

Various current topics in counseling and counseling psychology are offered. Contact the department office for information about topics courses planned for the near future.

595. Internship (2-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Students provide counseling services to diverse clients in either a school or community agency setting. Supervision is provided by experienced counselors in the field setting with coordination by program faculty. Attendance at a weekly seminar on campus is required. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 510 and 517 and 518 and 522 and 584 and 590. Restriction: admitted to graduate Counselor Education program.

615. Leadership, Advocacy and Professional Issues (3)

Advanced course in the study of leadership, advocacy for clients/profession/communities, current professional issues, and ethics in the profession of counseling and counselor education. Prerequisite: 510. Restriction: admitted to doctoral Counselor Education program.

620. Seminar in Counseling (3)

Doctoral seminars in topics such as professional issues, teaching and consultation are offered for advanced graduate students.

621. Advanced Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)

An in-depth comparison and contrast of major theories of counseling and psychotherapy. Theories representative of existential, psychoanalytic and behavioral viewpoints are considered.

625. Teaching in Counselor Education (3)

This course focuses on various models, perspectives, research, and techniques pertaining to learning to teach in counselor education. Restriction: admitted to doctoral Counselor Education program.

626 [514]. Supervision of Counseling Services (3)

Includes principles and techniques involved in developing and supervising counseling and guidance services in a variety of settings, including colleges and universities, public schools and various community agencies. Restriction: admitted to doctoral Counselor Education program.

630. Advanced Practicum in Counseling (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

636. Advanced Multicultural Counseling (3)

This course will provide counselor education doctoral students with knowledge and skills to teach and conduct advanced research in multicultural counseling. Prerequisite: 584. Restriction: admitted to Ph.D. Counselor Education.

646. Consultation, Program Evaluation, and Research in Counselor Education (3)

Provides counselor education doctoral students the knowledge and skill to conduct professional consultation, program evaluations, and counseling research. Curriculum builds on research and writing skills, applying them to professional evaluation and writing in counselor education. Prerequisite: EDPY 500 or (EDPY 502 and EDPY 505) or EDPY 511. Restriction: admitted to Ph.D. Counselor Education.

650. Advanced Group Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)

An advanced course in group counseling and group psychotherapy. Topics include therapeutic factors, group process observations, here-and-now work, and supervision of group work. Prerequisite: 518. Restriction: admitted to doctoral Counselor Education program.

696. Internship (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Community and Regional Planning (CRP)


165. Social Issues in Urban and Regional Development (3)

Introduction to the social, economic, political and physical factors involved in the development of cities and towns. Emphasis on the nature of urban form as a reflection of the prevailing past and present political economy of society.

181. Environmental Issues in a Changing World (3)

Development of the major issues, concepts and methods emerging from the relationship of social systems and the natural environment. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

265. Sustainable Community Planning Methods (3)

Teaches the basic concepts, processes and techniques of planning. Students learn to identify planning issues, problems and research questions; collect information to answer these questions; organize and analyze information; and develop policy recommendations.

275. Community Change in a Global Era (3)

This course examines the intersections among globalization, communities, and social action. It focuses on myriad ways global forces impact communities and how they work for local change in a global era.

330. Introduction to Urban Design (3)

This course introduces students to issues associated with the design of cities and aims to establish an understanding of the theories and methodologies of urban design. Prerequisite: 165.

335. Community Economics for Planners (3)

Introduces the intersections of economic theory and contemporary economic development issues and policies. Surveys how economic decisions and policies impact the shaping of space and development of communities. Introduces strategies to strengthen local economies. 

345. Stakeholders and Environmental Policy (3)

This course examines the complexity of environmental policymaking, and how stakeholders can impact and are impacted by environmental planning and policy at different scales.

355. Policing the City, From Albuquerque to Rio (3)

This course explores the dynamics of security, policing and inequality in diverse processes of urban development. Using global comparative perspectives, it explores the uneven distribution of safety, vulnerability and violence within and across communities.

376 [376 / 576]. Human Settlements (3)

Development of the form and structure of human settlements based on historical, cultural, economic and physical factors. Course includes various theoretical explanations of why settlements are organized, the way they are and how various elements of settlement system interact.

403 / 503. Community-Based Practice (3)

Exploration of practical skills for creating and implementing community based programs and plans with community partners. Skill development in mobilization, facilitation, and organizational development to implement community based plans and strategies.

413 / 513. Qualitative Research Methods (3)

Introduces students to the methods and techniques of qualitative inquiry. It focuses primarily on preparing students to conduct rigorous qualitative research, community based planning and analysis.

416 / 516. The Natural History of Watersheds: A Field Approach (3)

Taught completely in the field, we will evaluate the ecological health of three watersheds, exploring what John Muir described as the interconnectedness that ties everything together on this water planet.

420. Community Placemaking Studio (5)

This course addresses physical planning analytical methods and presentation skills, and prepares students for professional roles as active and effective participants in the ongoing process of managing the urban spatial environment. Prerequisite: 165 and 181 and 265.

421. Urban Design Studio (3)

Working in conjunction with a local community, student learn methodology, tools and techniques of urban design practice through innovative design analysis, critical mapping, production, representation and communication in the evolution of the built environment. Prerequisite: 165 and 181 and 265.

425 / 525. Water and Energy in New Mexico: Conversations on Our Common Future (3)

This course presents research, issues and perspectives about water and energy in New Mexico. It includes a speaker series with key experts from New Mexico's academic, government, research, nonprofit, and business communities. Restriction: junior or senior standing.

427 / 527. Watershed Management (3)

An introduction to the watershed as a rational planning unit, with case studies to illustrate principles of resource inventory, identification of land use problems and the formulation of plans for protection and rehabilitation.

429 / 551. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Problems are individualized topics conducted on a one to one student-faculty arrangement. Allows for exploration of various subjects of interest to students and faculty members.

436 / 536. Visualization Tools for Plan Making (3)

This course introduces students to fundamental techniques and tools used to create graphics in plan making. It is designed for planners to learn to communicate ideas graphically using both hand drawing and design software. Restriction: junior or senior standing.

462 / 562. The Housing Process (3)

A broad introduction to the housing system, housing policies, finance and funding mechanisms and development dynamics.

467 / 567. Regional Planning Process and Theory (3)

Basic theories and practices of regional planning and development. The physical, demographic and functional structure of regions. Problems of uneven development in the southwest; implications on the economic and cultural welfare of the region.

470. Seminar (1-3, no limit Δ)

Various topics related to planning in the southwest.

473 / 573. Planning on Native American Lands (3)

The social, political and economic interrelations between tribal lands and their activities with the outside dominant society. Case studies are used to present views in support of tribal autonomy and tribal integration.

474 / 574. Cultural Aspects of Community Development Planning (3)

Development theory, community planning and human ecology in different cultural settings. The course examines cases in Latin America, Southeast Asia, Western Europe and the U.S., as contexts for applied exercises. Relevant to B.A.E.P.D.

480. Community Growth and Land Use Planning (3)

Study of land use planning and growth management dynamics at the local level, in its physical, legal administrative and economic contexts. Restriction: admitted to B.A.E.P.D. Environmental Planning and Design.

482 / 582. Graphic Communications (3)

An introduction to hand drawing and graphic techniques. Students will become comfortable in expressing and communicating design thinking and ideas in graphic form.

483 / 583. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3)

Overview of GIS capabilities in the context of community issues and local government. Includes direct manipulation of ArcView software, lectures, demonstrations and analysis of urban GIS applications. Prerequisite: 265.

485 / 585. Practice of Negotiation and Public Dispute Resolution (3)

Introduces students to new ways to negotiate and resolve disputes in the context of professional practice through collaborative decision making and problem solving.

486 / 586. Planning Issues in Chicano Communities (3)

Applies planning concepts and techniques to development issues facing Chicanos in New Mexico generally and Albuquerque specifically. Other Chicano communities are studied for the insights gained from a comparative approach.

500. Planning Theory and Process (4)

A broad overview of planning theory and history, with a focus on current planning paradigms as they apply in practice. Introduces students to the roles professional planners play in practice and the strategies they employ and dilemmas they encounter. Restriction: admitted to M.C.R.P. Community and Regional Planning.

503 / 403. Community-Based Practice (3)

Exploration of practical skills for creating and implementing community based programs and plans with community partners. Skill development in mobilization, facilitation, and organizational development to implement community based plans and strategies.

508. Design and Planning Assistance Center (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

(Also offered as LA 504) Architectural and planning services to organizations and groups throughout the state who cannot afford traditional professional services. Advance approval required. Restriction: permission of program director.

511. Analytical Methods for Planning (3)

Introduction to comparative analysis of social, economic and spatial data as integrated into a typical comprehensive plan. Building data sets, organization of information, use of survey research, preliminary forecasting methods. Descriptive statistics a prerequisite. Prerequisite: 500.  Restriction: admitted to M.C.R.P. Community and Regional Planning and permission of graduate advisor.

513 / 413. Qualitative Research Methods (3)

Introduces students to the methods and techniques of qualitative inquiry. It focuses primarily on preparing students to conduct rigorous qualitative research, community based planning and analysis.

516 / 416. The Natural History of Watersheds: A Field Approach (3)

Taught completely in the field, we will evaluate the ecological health of three watersheds, exploring what John Muir described as the interconnectedness that ties everything together on this water planet.

520. Planning Studio (4)

Research and application of planning theory and methods appropriate to real urban settings from very large to neighborhood scale. Emphasis on sustainable development, equity and regional appropriateness. May be co-taught/combined with Architecture and Landscape.

525 / 425. Water and Energy in New Mexico: Conversations on Our Common Future (3)

This course presents research, issues and perspectives about water and energy in New Mexico. It includes a speaker series with key experts from New Mexico's academic, government, research, nonprofit, and business communities.

527 / 427. Watershed Management (3)

An introduction to the watershed as a rational planning unit, with case studies to illustrate principles of resource inventory, identification of land use problems and the formulation of plans for protection and rehabilitation.

530. Internship (2)

Professionally based experience in professional planning practice in public, private or non-profit settings. Supervision is given in the field setting as well as at an academic setting. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

531. Foundations of Community Development (3)

Explores what it takes to practice community development. What are processes of community development and how can planners enhance and build community in ways that promote fair and just distribution of resources and impacts.

532. Foundations of Natural Resources (3)

A foundation for applying planning concepts and analytical techniques to natural systems in regions. Ecology and environmental policy, land suitability analysis, natural resources accounting and impact assessment.

533. Foundations of Physical Planning (3)

(Also offered as ARCH 430 / 530) An introductory course of physical planning practice for Planning, Architecture and Landscape students. Graphic methods of analysis, field trips, cross-disciplinary projects range from regional plans to design details of the built environment.

534. Foundations of Indigenous Planning (3)

Examines the relationship of indigenous planning to other planning approaches such as advocacy, equity, and radical planning; considers aspects of “indegeneity” such as sovereignty, land tenure, and culture, and their application to community planning.

535. Community Economics for Planners (3)

Explores the intersections of economics and contemporary economic development issues and policies. How do economic decisions and policies impact the shaping of space and development of communities? Covers strategies to strengthen local economies.

536 / 436. Visualization Tools for Plan Making (3)

This course introduces students to fundamental techniques and tools used to create graphics in plan making. It is designed for planners to learn to communicate ideas graphically using both hand drawing and design software.

537. Urban Systems (3)

The study of city systems, form, and development with emphasis on social, economic, political, and physical aspects of cities as partial and total systems.

538. Community Participatory Methods (3)

Introduces students to community participatory methods, including democratizing information, building community capacity, and redistributing power in communities. This course is an anti-oppression, decolonization, and liberation centric course.

539. Indigenous Space, Place and Mapping (3)

Theories and methods related to Indigenous people, spaces, and the places they inhabit, urban to the rural, local to global, past to present. Examines epistemologies about space divergent from norms.

540. Pueblo Design and Planning (3)

Examines design and community development concepts in the context of the Pueblos of New Mexico. Provides an overview of history, culture, and projects based on Pueblo core values and processes.

541. Navajo Design and Planning (3)

Examines design and community development concepts in the context of the Navajo Nation; gives an overview of Navajo history, culture, and projects based on Navajo core values and worldview.

543. Transportation Planning (3)

Introduction to urban transportation subject area in a seminar format. Characteristics of urban transportation systems in U.S. and foreign cities are explored as are effects of urban transportation on local economies, urban form, the environment and the neighborhood.

546. Contemporary Indigenous Architecture (3)

Engages students in visually representing and researching contemporary indigenous architecture. Includes field trips, video presentations, guest lectures and readings, which explore the theoretical concepts of Indigenous design. Students produce an exhibit as their final project.

551 / 429. Problems (1-3, no limit Δ)

Individual study of problems in planning undertaken with faculty advisement and supervision. Restriction: permission of instructor.

562 / 462. The Housing Process (3)

A broad introduction to the housing system, housing policies, finance, funding mechanisms and development dynamics.

567 / 467. Regional Planning Process and Theory (3)

Basic theories and practices of regional planning and development. The physical, demographic and functional structure of regions. Problems of uneven development in the southwest; implications on the economic and cultural welfare of the region. Prerequisite: 511.

569. Rural Community Development (3)

Principles and practice of rural area development. Emphasis on rural issues of the Southwest. Includes field studies and analysis of theory.

570. Seminar (1-3, no limit Δ)

Various topics related to planning in the southwest.

573 / 473. Planning on Native American Lands (3)

The social, political and economic interrelations between tribal lands and their activities with the outside dominant society. Case studies are used to present views in support of tribal autonomy and tribal integration.

574 / 474. Cultural Aspects of Community Development Planning (3)

Development theory, community planning and human ecology in different cultural settings. The course examines cases in Latin America, Southeast Asia, Western Europe and the U.S. as contexts for applied exercises. Relevant to B.A.E.P.D.

577. Practice of Policy Development (3)

(Also offered as PADM 577) Introduction to practice of public policy development in technical and professional applications. Emphasis on writing, interpretation and implementation of policy documents. Environmental, physical and social policy are highlighted.  Required for the dual M.P.A./M.C.R.P. degree.

578. Development and Latin America (3)

This course covers key theories and histories about development in Latin American contexts. The dynamics of development include the political, economic, social, spatial and epistemological dimensions of social change, operating at multiple scales. 

580. The Politics of Land (3)

This course engages with the politics of land and land use. It explores the legal, administrative and economic processes through which land is conceptualized, exchanged and used.  Restriction: admitted to M.C.R.P. Community and Regional Planning.

582 / 482. Graphic Communications (3)

An introduction to hand drawing and graphic techniques. Students will become comfortable in expressing and communicating design thinking and ideas in graphic form.

583 / 483. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3)

Overview of GIS capabilities in the context of community issues and local government. Includes direct manipulation of ArcView software, lectures, demonstrations and analysis of urban GIS applications.

585 / 485. Practice of Negotiation and Public Dispute Resolution (3)

(Also offered as PADM 588) Introduces students to new ways to negotiate and resolve disputes in the context of professional practice through collaborative decision making and problem solving.

586 / 486. Planning Issues in Chicano Communities (3)

This course applies planning concepts and techniques to development issues facing Chicanos in New Mexico generally and Albuquerque specifically. We study other Chicano communities for the insights gained from a comparative approach.

587. Political Economy of Urban Development in a Global World (3)

Analyzes the political and economic factors shaping urban development with particular emphasis on the impacts of economic restructuring. As planners, we study how these changes affect the process of planning and policy formation.

588. Professional Project/Thesis Preparation Seminar (2, may be repeated twice Δ)

Development of project or thesis concept, investigation of data needs, initial data collection and assembly of written and field materials necessary to conduct a professional project or thesis. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.C.R.P. Community and Regional Planning.

589. Professional Project II (1-6, no limit Δ)

Development of a professional project reflective of advanced work in the field. Project should have an identified client, a time frame and a final product which demonstrates competence to engage in professional level planning. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

590. Historic Research Methods (3)

(Also offered as ARCH, LA 590) An introduction to the methods for the documentation, research and analysis of historic built environments as preparation for historic preservation and contemporary regional design.

591. Introduction to Preservation and Regionalism (3)

(Also offered as ARCH, LA 591) An introduction to the history, theory and professional practices of historic preservation and regional contemporary design and planning.

597. Capstone Planning Studio (1-6, no limit Δ)

Advanced studio projects responsive to client needs and useful to community organizations and public agencies. Results in final planning products which demonstrate competence to engage in professional level planning. Content varies each year. Restriction: admitted to M.C.R.P. program.

598. iTown Studio (1-6, no limit Δ)

This is an exit studio in the M.C.R.P. program and builds on the skills acquired in the first year of CRP classes. Students are expected to produce planning document deliverables to the indigenous community. Restriction: admitted to a graduate program in the School of Architecture and Planning.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Development of a research project reflective of advanced inquiry into a planning topic. Thesis should make concrete contributions to guide planning practice. Offered on a PR/CR/NC basis only.

691. Sustainable Settlements (3)

(Also offered as ARCH, LA 691) Urban design history, goals and theory with emphasis on cultural and ecological vibrancy. Restriction: admitted to a graduate program in Community and Regional Planning.

694. Urban Design Methods (1-3 to a maximum of 4 Δ)

(Also offered as ARCH, LA 694) Topics will vary but may include design of public space, streets, transit districts, tactical urbanism. This course will be organized as three modules. Restriction: admitted to a graduate program in Community and Regional Planning.




Computer Science (CS)


105L. Introduction to Computer Programming (3)

Introduction to Computer Programming is a gentle and fun introduction. Students will use a modern Integrated Development Environment to author small programs in a high level language that do interesting things.

108L. Computer Science for All: An Introduction to Computational Science and Modeling (3)

This course offers an introduction to computer science through modeling and simulation. Students will learn agent-based modeling of complex systems and see the applicability of computer science across fields. Course cannot apply to major in computer science or any other SOE major.

151L. Computer Programming Fundamentals for Non-Majors (3)

An introduction to the art of computing. Not intended for Computer Science majors or minors. The objective of the course is an understanding of the relationship between computing and problem solving.

152L. Computer Programming Fundamentals (3)

Introduction to the art of computing. The course objectives are understanding relationships between computation, problem solving, and programming using high-level languages. Prerequisite: 105L or 108L or 151L or ECE 131.

241L. Data Organization (3)

Data representation, storage and manipulation. Covers the memory organization of data storage and its relation to computation and efficiency. Topics include: linked vs. contiguous implementations, memory management, the use of indices and pointers, and an introduction to issues raised by the memory hierarchy. Programming assignments in C provide practice with programming styles that yield efficient code and computational experiments investigate the effect of storage design choices on the running time of programs. Prerequisite: 152L with a grade of "B-" or better or 259L with a grade of "C" or better.

251L. Intermediate Programming (3)

An introduction to the methods underlying modern program development. Specific topics will include object-oriented design and the development of graphical user interfaces. Programming assignments will emphasize the use of objects implemented in standard libraries. Three lectures, 1 hr. recitation. Prerequisite: 152L with a grade of "B-" or better.

259L. Data Structures with JAVA (5)

An accelerated course covering the material of 151L and 251L in one semester. Topics include elementary data structures and their implementation, recursive procedures, data abstraction and encapsulation, and program organization and verification. Programs will be written in JAVA. Credit not allowed for both 259L and 151L/251L.

261. Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science (3)

Introduction to the formal mathematical concepts of computer science for the beginning student. Topics include elementary logic, induction, algorithmic processes, graph theory and models of computation. Prerequisite: (MATH 1240 with a grade of "A" or better) or (MATH 1512 with a grade of "B-" or better).

293. Social and Ethical Issues in Computing (1)

Overview of philosophical ethics, privacy and databases, intellectual property, computer security, computer crime, safety and reliability, professional responsibility and codes, electronic communities and the Internet, and social impact of computers. Students make oral presentations and produce written reports.

341L. Introduction to Computer Architecture and Organization (3)

Survey of various levels of computer architecture and design: microprogramming and processor architecture, advanced assembly language programming, operating system concepts and input/output via the operating system. Prerequisite: 241L with a grade of "C" or better and ECE 238L with a grade of "C" or better. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

351L. Design of Large Programs (4)

A projects course with emphasis on object-oriented analysis, design and programming. Also discussed are programming language issues, programming tools and other computer science concepts as needed to do the projects (e.g., discrete-event simulation, parsing). Prerequisite: 241L with a grade of "C" or better and (251L with a grade of "C" or better or 259L with a grade of "C" or better) and 261 with a grade of "C" or better.  Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

357L. Declarative Programming (3)

Course focuses on one of the declarative programming paradigms: functional, logic, or constraint programming. Specialized techniques are introduced with a view towards general principles. Selected advanced topics in programming language design and implementation are covered. Prerequisite: 241L with a grade of "C" or better and (251L with a grade of "C" or better or 259L with a grade of "C" or better) and 261 with a grade of "C" or better.  Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

361L. Data Structures and Algorithms (3)

An introduction to data structures and algorithms and the mathematics needed to analyze their time and space complexity. Topics include asymptotic notation, recurrence relations and their solution, sorting, hash tables, basic priority queues, search trees (including at least one balanced structure) and basic graph representation and search. Students complete a term project that includes an experimental assessment of competing data structures. Prerequisite: 241L with a grade of "C" or better and 261 with a grade of "C" or better. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

362. Data Structures and Algorithms II (3)

A continuation of 361L with an emphasis on design of algorithms. Topics include: amortized analysis and self-adjusting data structures for trees and priority queues; union-find; minimum spanning tree, shortest path and other graph algorithms; elementary computational geometry; greedy and divide-and-conquer paradigms. Prerequisite: 361L with a grade of "C" or better. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

365. Introduction to Scientific Modeling (3)

Symbolic computation applied to scientific problem solving, modeling, simulation and analysis. Prerequisite: 151L or 152L. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

*375. Introduction to Numerical Computing (3)

(Also offered as MATH **375) An introductory course covering such topics as solution of linear and nonlinear equations; interpolation and approximation of functions, including splines; techniques for approximate differentiation and integration; solution of differential equations; familiarization with existing software. Prerequisite: (151L or 152L or ECE 131 or PHYS 2415) and (MATH **314 or MATH **316 or MATH **321). Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

390. Topics in Computer Science for Non-Majors-Undergraduate (1-3, no limit Δ)

This course is intended to provide students in other disciplines with an opportunity to study aspects of modern computer science, tailored to their own field of study. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and permission of instructor.

412. Introduction to Computer Graphics: Scanline Algorithms (3)

(Also offered as ECE 412) This course is an introduction to the technical aspects of raster algorithms in computer graphics. Students will learn the foundational concepts of 2-D and 3-D graphics as they relate to real-time and offline techniques. Students will develop a video game as a final project to demonstrate the algorithms learned in class. Prerequisite: 361L or ECE **331. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering. {Fall}

422 / 522. Digital Image Processing (3)

Introduction to fundamentals of digital image processing. Specific topics include grey level histograms, geometric/grey level transformations, linear systems theory, Fourier transforms, frequency domain filtering, wavelet transforms, image compression, edge detection, color vision, and binary image morphology. Prerequisite: MATH **314 or MATH **321. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

**423. Introduction to Complex Adaptive Systems (3)

Introduces topics in complex adaptive systems, including: definitions of complexity, fractals, dynamical systems and chaos, cellular automata, artificial life, game theory, neural networks, genetic algorithms and network models. Regular programming projects are required. Prerequisite: 251L and MATH 1512. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

427 / 527. Principles of Artificially Intelligent Machines (3)

Survey of artificial intelligence exclusive of pattern recognition. Heuristic search techniques, game playing, mechanical theorem proving, additional topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: 351L. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

429 / 529. Introduction to Machine Learning (3)

Introduction to principles and practice of systems that improve performance through experience. Topics include statistical learning framework, supervised and unsupervised learning, Bayesian analysis, time series analysis, reinforcement learning, performance evaluation and empirical methodology; design tradeoffs. Prerequisite: 362 and STAT **345 and (MATH **314 or MATH **321). Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

442 / 542. Introduction to Parallel Processing (3)

Introduction to parallel scientific and data intensive programming architectures and systems. Performance issues, speed-up and efficiency. Parallel programming issues and models: control parallel, data parallel and data flow. Programming assignments on massively parallel machines. Prerequisite: 341L or *471 or 467 or MATH *471.

444 / 544. Introduction to Cybersecurity (3)

This class will focus on proactive security, i.e. designing networks, algorithms and data structures which are provably robust to attack. Grades will be based on class participation, presentations, and class projects. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

456 / 556. Advanced Declarative Programming (3)

Continued study in one of the declarative programming paradigms: functional, logic, or constraint programming. Specialized techniques are introduced with a view towards general principles. Prerequisite: 357L. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

**460. Software Engineering (3)

Software engineering principles will be discussed and applied to a large team developed project. Other topics relevant to the production of software will also be covered, including ethics, legalities, risks, copyrights and management issues. Prerequisite: 351L with a grade of "C" or better. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

464 / 564. Introduction to Database Management (3)

Introduction to database management systems. Emphasis is on the relational data model. Topics covered include query languages, relational design theory, file structures and query optimization. Students will implement a database application using a nonprocedural query language interfaced with a host programming language. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

467 / 567. Principles and Applications of Big Data (3)

This course explores data analysis and management techniques, which applied to massive datasets are the cornerstone that enable real-time decision making in distributed environments, business intelligence, and scientific discovery at large scale. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

*471. Introduction to Scientific Computing (3)

(Also offered as MATH *471) Introduction to scientific computing fundamentals, exposure to high performance programming language and scientific computing tools, case studies of scientific problem solving techniques. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

**481. Computer Operating Systems (3)

(Also offered as ECE *437) Fundamental principles of modern operating systems design, with emphasis on concurrency and resource management. Topics include processes, interprocess communication, semaphores, monitors, message passing, input/output device, deadlocks memory management, files system design. Prerequisite: 341L or ECE **331. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

**485. Introduction to Computer Networks (3)

(Also offered as ECE *440) Theoretical and practical study of computer networks, including network structures and architectures. Principles of digital communications systems. Network topologies, protocols and services. TCP/IP protocol suite. Point-to-point networks; broadcast networks; local area networks; routing, error and flow control techniques. Prerequisite: ECE 330. Pre- or corequisite: ECE **340. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

491. Special Topics-Undergraduates (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Undergraduate seminars in special topics in computer science. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

495 / 595. Advanced Topics in Computer Science (3, no limit Δ)

This course will cover advanced topics in Computer Science. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

499. Individual Study-Undergraduate (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Guided study, under the supervision of a faculty member, of selected topics not covered in regular courses. At most 3 hours may be applied toward the CS hour requirement. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering.

500. Introduction to the Theory of Computation (3)

Covers basic topics in automata, computability and complexity theory, including: models of computation (finite automata, Turing machines and RAMs); regular sets and expressions; recursive, r.e., and non-r.e. sets and their basic closure properties; complexity classes; determinism vs. non-determinism with and without resource bounds; reductions and completeness; practice with NP- and P-completeness proofs; and the complexity of optimization and approximation problems.

506. Computational Geometry (3)

Development of algorithms and data structures for the manipulation of discrete geometric objects in two- and three-dimensional space. Typical problems include intersection and union of polyhedra, convex hulls, triangulation, point location, neighborhood structures and path computations. Prerequisite: 561.

510. Mobile Computing (3)

Internet and wireless communication are two technologies having a significant impact on the social fabric. This course is concerned with methods and principles for the development of systems that exhibit some form of mobility.

512. Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)

(Also offered as ECE 512) Covers image synthesis techniques from perspective of high-end scanline rendering, including physically-based rendering algorithms. Topics: radiometry, stochastic ray tracing, variance reduction, photon mapping, reflection models, participating media, advanced algorithms for light transport.

520. Topics in Interdisciplinary Biological and Biomedical Sciences (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH 620, BIOL 520, ECE 620, STAT 520) Varying interdisciplinary topics taught by collaborative scientists from UNM, SFI, and LANL.

521. Data Mining Techniques (3)

Introductory topics in data mining including: clustering, classification, outlier detection and association-rule discovery. Advanced topics: technologies for data mining, algorithms for mining rich data types and applications of mining algorithms.

522 / 422. Digital Image Processing (3)

Introduction to fundamentals of digital image processing. Specific topics include grey level histograms, geometric/grey level transformations, linear systems theory, Fourier transforms, frequency domain filtering, wavelet transforms, image compression, edge detection, color vision, and binary image morphology. Prerequisite: MATH **314 or MATH **321.

523. Complex Adaptive Systems (3)

A graduate introduction to computational tools to measure, simulate and analyze complexity in biological and social systems. Topics include cellular automata, dynamical systems, genetic algorithms and other biologically inspired computational methods. Programming maturity is required.

527 / 427. Principles of Artificially Intelligent Machines (3)

Survey of artificial intelligence exclusive of pattern recognition. Heuristic search techniques, game playing, mechanical theorem proving, additional topics selected by the instructor. Prerequisite: 351L.

529 / 429. Introduction to Machine Learning (3)

Introduction to principles and practice of systems that improve performance through experience. Topics include statistical learning framework, supervised and unsupervised learning, Bayesian analysis, time series analysis, reinforcement learning, performance evaluation and empirical methodology; design tradeoffs. Prerequisite: 362 or 530 or 561.

530. Geometric and Probabilistic Methods in Computer Science (3)

Introduction to applied mathematics for computer scientists. Specific topics include discrete and continuous random variables (including transformation and sampling), information theory, Huffman coding, Markov processes, linear systems theory, Fourier transforms, principal component analysis, and wavelet transforms. Prerequisite: STAT 345.

533. Experimental Methods in Computer Science (3)

An introduction to experimental methods in Computer Science.

542 / 442. Introduction to Parallel Processing (3)

Introduction to parallel scientific and data intensive programming architectures and systems. Performance issues, speed-up and efficiency. Parallel programming issues and models: control parallel, data parallel and data flow. Programming assignments on massively parallel machines. Prerequisite: 341L or *471 or 567 or MATH *471.

544 / 444. Introduction to Cybersecurity (3)

This class will focus on proactive security, i.e. designing networks, algorithms and data structures which are provably robust to attack. Grades will be based on class participation, presentations, and class projects.

547. Neural Networks (3)

(Also offered as ECE 547) A study of neuron models, basic neural nets and parallel distributed processing. Prerequisite: MATH **314 or **321.

550. Programming Languages and Systems (3)

Current trends in design and philosophy of languages and systems. Data abstraction, data flow languages, alternative control structures, environments, correctness, software tools. Prerequisite: 558.

551. Individual Study-Graduate (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Guided study, under the supervision of a faculty member, of selected topics not covered in regular courses. Restriction: permission of instructor.

554 [554 / 454]. Compiler Construction (3)

Syntax analysis and semantic processing for a block-structured language. Lexical analysis, symbol tables, run-time management. Students will write a compiler. Prerequisite: 341L and 351L.

555. Advanced Topics in Compiler Construction (3)

Aspects needed to write production quality compilers. Optimization, error recovery, parse table compression, semantic processing of complex data structures, type checking, run-time support, code generation, compiler-writing systems. Prerequisite: 454 or 554.

556 / 456. Advanced Declarative Programming (3)

Continued study in one of the declarative programming paradigms: functional, logic, or constraint programming. Specialized techniques are introduced with a view towards general principles. Prerequisite: 558.

558. Software Foundations (3)

Introduction to modern programming techniques and programming language features and the theory used to describe and define programming languages, using types as the organizational principle.

561. Algorithms/Data Structure (3)

Study of data structures and algorithms and mathematics needed to analyze their time and space complexity. Topics include: amortized analysis and self-adjusting data structures for trees and priority queues, graphing algorithms, greedy and divide-and-conquer paradigms.

564 / 464. Introduction to Database Management (3)

Introduction to database management systems. Emphasis is on the relational data model. Topics covered include query languages, relational design theory, file structures and query optimization. Students will implement a database application using a nonprocedural query language interfaced with a host programming language. Prerequisite: 561.

565. Topics in Database Management (3)

A continuation of 464/564 with emphasis on query optimization, leading-edge data models, transaction management and distributed databases. Additional topics determined by student interests. Prerequisite: 564.

567 / 467. Principles and Applications of Big Data (3)

This course explores data analysis and management techniques, which applied to massive datasets are the cornerstone that enable real-time decision making in distributed environments, business intelligence, and scientific discovery at large scale.

575. Introductory Numerical Analysis: Numerical Linear Algebra (3)

(Also offered as MATH 504) Direct and iterative methods of the solution of linear systems of equations and least squares problems. Error analysis and numerical stability. The eigenvalue problem. Descent methods for function minimization, time permitting. Prerequisite: MATH 464 or MATH 514. {Spring}

576. Introductory Numerical Analysis: Approximation and Differential Equations (3)

(Also offered as MATH 505) Solution of nonlinear problems and minimization. Numerical approximation of functions. Interpolation by polynomials, splines and trigonometric functions. Numerical integration and solution of ordinary differential equations. An introduction to finite difference and finite element methods, time permitting. Prerequisite: MATH **316 or MATH 401. {Fall}

580. The Specification of Software Systems (3)

A comparative study of the techniques used to specify software systems. The course will emphasize formal techniques and will cover the specification of sequential and concurrent systems. Although no programming will be required, students will be required to write specifications for several small software systems. Prerequisite: 460.

581. Fundamentals of Software Testing (3)

Introduces the components of software development life cycle and role of software test process, test planning and strategy, static testing, tracking bugs, dynamic testing, use of automated testing as well as other testing concepts.

583. Object Oriented Testing (3)

Introduction to software test process. Topics include: testing perspectives, object-oriented concepts, UML diagrams, development/testing processes, test design, test case development, verifying tests, test case automation, test patterns, and understanding basic concepts of class hierarchies.

585. Computer Networks (3)

A theoretical and practical study of computer networks, including network structures and architectures; protocols and protocol hierarchies; error handling; routing; reliability; point-to-point networks; broadcast networks; local area networks; efficiency and throughput; communications technologies; case studies.

587. Advanced Operating Systems (3)

Theory of design of operating systems. Modeling, simulation, synchronization, concurrency, process hierarchies, networks and distributed systems.

590. Topics in Computer Science for Non-Majors-Graduate (1-3, no limit Δ)

This course is intended to provide students in other disciplines with an opportunity to study aspects of modern computer science, tailored to their own field of study. Restriction: permission of instructor.

591. Special Topics-Graduate (1-6, no limit Δ)

Graduate seminars in special topics in computer science. Restriction: permission of instructor.

592. Colloquium (1, may be repeated three times Δ)

Required of all graduate students. May be repeated, with at most 2 credits towards the M.S. requirements and at most 2 further credits towards the Ph.D. requirements. Students will write a short essay on the topic of one or more of the colloquia offered that semester. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

595 / 495. Advanced Topics in Computer Science (3, no limit Δ)

This course will cover advanced topics in Computer Science.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

600. Computer Science Research Practicum (3)

Develop and practice the skills required to conduct an independent research project. Intended for graduate students pursuing a Ph.D. in Computer Science. Restriction: admitted to Ph.D. Computer Science.

650. Reading and Research (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

691. Seminar in Computer Science (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Dance (DANC)


1110 [105]. Dance Appreciation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course introduces the student to the diverse elements that make up the world of dance, including a broad historic overview, roles of the dancer, choreographer and audience, and the evolution of the major genres. Students will learn the fundamentals of dance technique, dance history, and a variety of dance aesthetics. Course fee required. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. {Fall, Spring}

1120 [127]. African Dance I (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

African Dance I introduces the student to the aesthetics of African dance technique and develops knowledge and appreciation of its fundamental movements, music, and culture. Students will gain perspectives of African culture through discussion of how music, rhythm, and dance are used in African societies. Course fee required.

1130 [149]. Ballet I (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

This course is the beginning level of ballet technique. Students learn the basic fundamentals and performance skills of ballet technique, which may include flexibility, strength, body alignment, coordination, range of motion, vocabulary, and musicality. Course fee required. {Fall, Spring}

1140 [169]. Flamenco I (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

This course introduces the student to the art of flamenco and its cultural features and significance. Students will learn the fundamentals of this art form and introductory techniques and skills, which may include handwork, footwork, postures, and specific dances. Course fee required. {Fall, Spring}

1150 [110]. Modern Dance I (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Fundamental work for the adult beginner in Modern Dance techniques and styles. Course fee required. {Fall, Spring}

132. Jazz I (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Fundamental work for the adult beginner in technique and styles of jazz dance. Course fee required. {Fall}

170. Hip Hop I (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

An introduction to Hip Hop, its movement, style and culture. Course fee required. {Fall, Spring}

201. Crew Practicum (0)

Participation in University theatre and dance season through assignment on a production crew. To be completed in one semester. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

204. Stretching, Strengthening and Conditioning for the Performing Arts (3 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

Specialized floor work training using principles of the Pilates Methodology and the basic movement concepts of Core Dynamics™. For preparing and maintaining a uniformly developed body for dance and movement. Course fee required. {Fall, Spring, Summer}

210. Modern Dance II (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Modern dance techniques and styles at the intermediate level. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

212. Improvisation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Introduction to improvisational skills in movement and the principles of choreography as applied to dance/theater composition. Investigation of structured improvisation within the fundamental elements of dance: energy, space, and time. {Fall}

232. Jazz II (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Jazz techniques and styles at the intermediate level. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

240. Music Essentials for Contemporary Dance (3)

Overview of fundamental elements of music and historically significant collaborations between choreographers and composers in contemporary dance.

242. Music Essentials for Flamenco (3)

Overview of Flamenco music and history fundamentals, introduction to basic music notation. Primary focus on developing listening skills through a variety of Flamenco song forms. Basic rhythmic notation specifically applied to palmas and footwork patterns.

249. Ballet II (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intermediate level Ballet. Introduction of more advanced Ballet vocabulary at barre/center work; increase flexibility, strength, body alignment, and coordination for practice of steps/combinations with variations in timing and changes of facing. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring}

269. Flamenco II (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Flamenco techniques and styles at the intermediate level. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

289. Topics in Flamenco (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Various topics such as: Cante, Cuadro/Improvisation/ Structure, Spanish Form/Castanets, Palmas and Cajon, Brazeo/Marcaje, Footwork and Vueltas and Bata de Cola/Manton/Abanico. Course fee required.

295. Special Topics in Dance (3 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

Lecture courses and workshops on various topics in dance. Course fee required. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

310. Modern Dance III (3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Modern dance techniques and styles at the advanced level. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

311. Choreography I (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Creating and exploring movement vocabulary and forms generating choreography; development of ideas and inspirations into short works; space and its importance; giving and receiving critical feedback; exposure to choreography supported by video and reading.  Prerequisite: 212. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring}

313. Kinesiology for Dancers (3, no limit Δ)

Structural analysis of movement. This lecture class provides a basic understanding of the skeletal and neuromuscular systems of the human body in movement. Course fee required. {Fall}

349. Ballet III (3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Advanced level Ballet. Improvement of physical and mental skills necessary for professional level Ballet technique, growth in physical stamina, coordination and phrasing, movement efficiency, faster and more accurate assimilation of new movement and spatial awareness. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

369. Flamenco III (3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Advanced technique in Flamenco with resident and visiting professors, offering a wide variety of exercises to hone abilities to learn choreography effectively while examining student strengths and weaknesses in personal exploration of the art form. Course fee required.  Prerequisite: 379. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall, Spring}

370. Hip Hop II (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intermediate to advanced study of Hip Hop, its movement, style and culture. Course fee required. Prerequisite: 170 or permission of instructor.

379. Flamenco Structure/Improvisation (3)

Study of various elements necessary in an improvisational setting in Flamenco. Using “tangos” and “Bulerias” as a format, students study the compass of each palo, then move to several traditional letras appropriate to these forms. {Spring}

411 / 511. Choreography II (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Further exploration in generating and organizing movement material for performance. Course fee required. Prerequisite: 311. {Fall}

416 / 516. Dance Pedagogy (3)

Theories of teaching. Principles and techniques of curriculum development in elementary schools, secondary schools, higher education and in private schools. Course fee required. {Spring, odd numbered years}

431. Writing About Dance (3)

Observation and written analysis of dance events with an emphasis on contemporary theories and performances. Course fee required. {Spring, even numbered years}

462 / 562. Dance History I (3)

A study of the history of dance from tribal culture to 19th-century Romantic ballet. Course fee required.

463 / 563. Dance History II (3)

A survey of the origins of modern ballet and modern dance from the late 19th century to the mid-20th century. Extensive readings culminating in a research paper will be required. Course fee required.

464 / 564. Dance History III (3)

Study of contemporary choreography from Modernism to the present. Particular emphasis on feminism and post-modernism as these movements have influenced our understanding of dancing and dance-making.

466 / 566. Flamenco History (3)

Introduction to Flamenco history, investigation of the controversial history of the art form through study of Gypsy history, Spanish history, and major figures and events that shaped the evolution of Flamenco. {Spring, odd numbered years}

479 / 579. Flamenco Choreography (3)

Designed for advanced students with knowledge of Flamenco structure and improvisation, cante, palmas, and three levels of Flamenco technique, investigation of choreography in Flamenco movement and rhythms. Prerequisite: 379. {Fall}

487 / 587. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, MUS, THEA 487 / 587; FDMA *487) Analyzes major instances of interdisciplinary influence and collaboration in the present day. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Spring}

495. Special Studies in Dance (3 to a maximum 15 Δ)

Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Offered upon demand}

496 / 596. Student Production Project (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Independent project culminating in a formal, informal or video performance. Students must submit a proposal to instructor and program head. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

497 / 597. Independent Study (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Independent project culminating in a formal paper. Students must submit a proposal to instructor and program head. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

499. Departmental Honors (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Students achieving an overall grade point of 3.50 will qualify for departmental honors, which requires a research or creative project with supporting written document. Restriction: permission of department.

500. Introduction to Graduate Study (3)

Research methods for performing arts including development of working bibliography, types of documentation, investigation of research materials in theatre and dance. Course fee required. Required of all entering graduate students. {Fall}

503. Performance Theory (3)

(Also offered as THEA 503) An introduction to the theories undergirding the dynamic fields of theatre and performance studies its methodologies, genealogies, and current trends. This seminar investigates performance as a site and method of study.  {Spring, even-numbered years}

506. Critical Issues in the Performing Arts (3)

(Also offered as THEA 506) Examination of major problems and questions arising from interaction between the performing arts and the political, economic and social conditions in which they live. Survey of major figures in contemporary performing arts.

509. Graduate Internship (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Individualized work with Department faculty or professional artists in Dance or Theatre. Internship to be conceived in advance and structured throughout by directed study. Culminates in critical paper. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

510. Creative Investigations I (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An in depth study of the nature of creative investigation and art-making in dance with the prospect of finding alternative ways of constructing dance movement and composing new works. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

511 / 411. Choreography II (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Further exploration in generating and organizing movement material for performance. A major piece of 20–30 minutes in duration or several smaller works of equivalent total length will be required. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

512. Graduate Seminar (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Topical seminars in the areas of choreography, history and criticism and dance education. Course fee required.

515. Creative Investigations II (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Further in-depth study of the nature of creative investigation and art-making specifically as it pertains to dance composition. Works-in-progress begun during the previous semester will be brought to completion. Course fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

516 / 416. Dance Pedagogy (3 to a maximum of 6)

Theories and teaching. Principles and techniques of curriculum development in the elementary and secondary schools, higher education and in private studios. Course fee required. {Spring, odd numbered years}

531. Dance Criticism (3)

Observation and written analysis of dance events with an emphasis on contemporary theories and performances. Course fee required. {Spring, even numbered years}

549. Dance Technique for Graduate Students (1-4, no limit Δ)

Regularly-scheduled technique course. Students must enroll in the appropriate section by dance genre and level. Course fee required. {Fall, Spring}

551 / 552. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



562 / 462. Dance History I (3 to a maximum of 6)

A study of the history of dance from tribal culture to 19th-century Romantic ballet. Extensive readings culminating in a research paper will be required. Course fee required.

563 / 463. Dance History II (3 to a maximum of 6)

A survey of the origins of modern ballet and modern dance from the late 19th century to the beginning of Modernism. Extensive readings culminating in a formal research paper. Course fee required.

564 / 464. Dance History III (3 to a maximum of 6)

Study of contemporary choreography from Modernism to the present. Particular emphasis on feminism and post-modernism as these movements have influenced our understanding of dancing and dance-making. Course fee required.

566 / 466. Flamenco History (3 to a maximum of 6)

Introduction to Flamenco history, investigation of the controversial history of the art form through study of Gypsy history, Spanish history and major figures and events that shaped the evolution of Flamenco. Course fee required.

579 / 479. Flamenco Choreography (3 to a maximum of 6)

Designed for advanced students with knowledge of Flamenco structure and improvisation, cante, palmas, and three levels of Flamenco technique, investigation of choreography in Flamenco movement and rhythms. Prerequisite: 379. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

587 / 487. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, MUS, THEA 587 / 487; FDMA *487) Analyzes major instances of interdisciplinary influence and collaboration in the present day. Course fee required.

596 / 496. Student Production Project (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Independent project culminating in a formal, informal or video performance. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

597 / 497. Independent Study (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Independent project culminating in a final paper. Students must submit a proposal to instructor and Dance Program Head. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

598. Master's Essay in Theatre and Dance (3)

Offered for students who have been advanced to candidacy and who have elected Plan II. {Summer, Fall, Spring}

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

699. Dissertation (3-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Dental Hygiene (DEHY)


205. Introduction to Dental Hygiene (2)

Introduction to Dental Hygiene is a comprehensive overview of major topics and issues germane to the practice of dental hygiene. Topics selected in this course are intended to provide entering dental hygiene students with an understanding of the role of the dental hygienist in disease prevention, therapeutic services provided by dental hygienists and professional growth. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene. {Spring}

210. Head and Neck Anatomy (2)

Anatomy of head and neck with emphasis on oral structures and their function. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene. {Spring}

211. Dental Anatomy (2)

A didactic and laboratory course in basic dental anatomy. Included is the study of the permanent and primary dentitions: form and function, and tooth identification. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

250. Gen Oral Hist and Embrey (2)

Study of cells, tissues, organ systems and embrology with emphasis on the oral structure. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

301. Clinical Dental Hygiene Lecture I (3)

Provides student with the theoretical basis to perform clinical dental hygiene. Topics covered include: intra- and extraoral examination procedures, periodontal tissue characteristics, occlusion and basic dental hygiene instrumentation. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

302. Clinical Dental Hygiene I (2)

Provides the student with hands-on experiences in a clinical setting. Students practice dental hygiene evaluative and instrumentation skills learned in 301. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

303. Clinical Dental Hygiene Lecture II (3)

Theories and clinical performance of specific dental hygiene treatment concerns as well as biomedical/dental concerns are emphasized. Content includes nutritional counseling, intraoral photography, periodontal debridement and microscopic evaluation of plaque samples. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

304. Clinical Dental Hygiene II (3)

This course refines assessment and instrumentation skills. Emphasis is focused upon developing case management skills relative to periodontal debridement, dietary counseling, desensitization, phase contrast microscopy, subgingival irrigation and other related preventive skills. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

312. Dental Radiology- Lab (3)

Didactic, laboratory and clinical course which includes basic concepts for radiation physics, radiation biology and protection, exposure techniques, film processing and mounting, quality assurance and radiographic appearance of normal and some abnormal anatomic landmarks. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

320. Dental Bio-Materials (2)

A survey of materials used in dentistry and dental hygiene and dental laboratory procedures. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

330. Dental Health Education I (2)

This course includes the Etiology of prevalent oral diseases with a focus upon developing the education skills necessary to counsel dental hygiene patients. Dental and periodontal charting techniques are introduced. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

335. Dental Office Emergencies (2)

An introduction to emergency situations in the dental office with emphasis on taking and recording health/dental history and procedures required to prevent occurrence of an emergency situation. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene. {Fall}

340. General and Oral Pathology (3)

Pathology of the head and neck and the major diseases that affect the oral cavity.  Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene. {Spring}

360. Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist (3)

Basic principles of pharmacology and their application to dental hygiene. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

370. Special Care in Dental Hygiene (2)

A didactic course with topics covered to include medically and physically compromised patients, management of the geriatric population and hospital dentistry. Assigned rotations with affiliated health care facilities are a part of 440. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

400 / 500. Current Issues in Dental Hygiene (3)

In depth discussions focusing on current issues facing the dental hygiene discipline. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

401. Clinical Dental Hygiene Lecture III (2)

Advanced clinical concepts and procedures. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

402. Clinical Dental Hygiene III (3)

Students refine dental hygiene skills while learning new techniques. Emphasis is placed upon the quality of care the student renders. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

403. Clinical Dental Hygiene Lecture IV (2)

This course is designed to emphasize treatment of medically compromised patients. Guest speakers representing various dental specialties are also included. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

404. Clinical Dental Hygiene IV (4)

Clinical course which helps the student develop time management skills necessary for private practice and provides an environment necessary to further develop the student's periodontal skills through routine periodontal treatment and periodontal surgery. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

407. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topical research and new procedures that cannot be accommodated in the regular dental hygiene curriculum. Hours arranged. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

410 / 510. Dental Hygiene Research Methodology (3)

Developing of research in regard to special areas in dental hygiene with emphasis on writing reports. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

422. Dental Public Health I (3)

Study of the dental care delivery system in the world today and a global perspective of the science of oral disease prevention. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

423. Dental Public Health II (1)

Application of principles and objectives studied in 422. Students will plan and develop specific educational programs for schools, hospitals, nursing homes, mental retardation centers and other groups in the community. Prerequisite: 422. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

440. Extramural Experience (1-6 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Provides the student with the opportunity to achieve educational and clinical skills and in depth knowledge in various dental care delivery systems. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

442. Principles of Practice (2)

Introduction to dental hygiene professional ethics, professional association, principles, laws, regulations and office management. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

470. Periodontology I (3)

Didactically covers basic biological principles and the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene. {Fall}

480. Local Anesthesia and Pain Control (3)

Instruction and clinical practice in the administration of local anesthetic agents and other pain control treatment modalities. Restriction: admitted to B.S.D.H. Dental Hygiene.

500 / 400. Current Issues in Dental Hygiene (3)

Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

501. Dental Hygiene Administration (3)

Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

502. Dental Hygiene Instructional Strategies (3)

Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

503. Oral Medicine (3)

Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

504. Dental Hygiene Internship (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

505. Clinical Teaching and Administration (4)

Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

507. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Topical research and new procedures that cannot be accommodated in the regular dental hygiene curriculum. Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

510 / 410. Dental Hygiene Research Methodology (3)

Developing of research in regard to special areas in dental hygiene with emphasis on writing reports. Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

538. Statistics in Dental Hygiene Research (3)

This course is designed to provide a conceptual foundation of statistics related to basic, clinical and behavioral dental hygiene science. Prerequisite: 510. Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

560. Nonthesis Project (3)

Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.

599. Dental Hygiene Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Continuation of research, culminating in Master’s Degree Thesis. The student is responsible for following procedures of the Office of Graduate Studies. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to M.S. Dental Hygiene.




Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)


101. Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (1)

Insight into electrical and computer engineering is gained through videos and the use of computer software to learn basic problem-solving skills. 

131L [131]. Programming Fundamentals (4 [3])

Fundamental programming concepts, including consideration of abstract machine models with emphasis on the memory hierarchy, basic programming constructs, functions, parameter passing, pointers and arrays, file I/O, bit-level operations, programming in the Linux environment, and lab.  Prerequisite: (MATH 1220 or higher) or ACT Math =>25 or SAT Math Section =>590 or ACCUPLACER College-Level Math =>69.  {Fall, Spring}

203. Circuit Analysis I (3)

Basic elements and sources. Energy and power. Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's laws. Resistive networks, node and loop analysis. Network theorems. First-order and second-order circuits. Sinusoidal sources and complex representations: impedance, phasors, complex power. Three-phase circuits. Prerequisite: ENG 120 or MATH 1522. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 1320. {Fall, Spring}

206L. Instrumentation (2)

Introduction to laboratory practices and the use of test equipment. Measurements on basic electrical components, dc and ac circuits using ohmmeters, voltmeters, ammeters and oscilloscopes. Circuit simulation. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700. Pre- or corequisite: 203. {Fall, Spring}

213. Circuit Analysis II (3)

Analysis of balanced three-phase circuits. Laplace transform with applications to circuit analysis. Passive and active filters. Fourier series and Fourier transform analysis. The two-port circuits.  Prerequisite: 203. Pre- or corequisite: 300 or (MATH **314 and MATH **316). {Fall, Spring} 

231L [231]. Intermediate Programming and Engineering Problem Solving (4 [3])

Introduction to elementary data structures, program design and computer-based solution of engineering problems. Topics include use of pointers, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, graphs, software design methodology, programming in the Linux environment, and lab.  Prerequisite: 131L or CS 152L. {Fall, Spring}

238L. Computer Logic Design (4)

Binary number systems. Boolean algebra. Combinational, sequential and register transfer logic. VHDL. Arithmetic/logic unit. Memories, computer organization. Input-output. Microprocessors. Prerequisite: 131 or CS 152L. {Fall, Spring}

300. Advanced Engineering Mathematics (4)

First and second order Ordinary Differential Equations are solved with various methods including Laplace Transforms, matrices, eigenvalues and other techniques involving linear algebra. Applications will be emphasized using MATLAB. Prerequisite: MATH 1522. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

**314L [**314]. Signals and Systems (4 [3])

Continuous and discrete time signals and systems; time and frequency domain analysis of LTI systems, Fourier series and transforms, discrete time Fourier series/transform, Z-transform, sampling theorem, block diagrams, modulation/demodulation and filters, Computer implementations.  Prerequisite: 213 and 300. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

**321L. Electronics I (4)

Introduction to diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors. Analysis and design of digital circuits, gates, flip-flops and memory circuits. Circuits employing operational amplifiers. Analog to digital and digital to analog converters. Prerequisite: 206L and 213. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

**322L. Electronics II (4)

Analysis, design, and characterization of linear circuits including operational amplifiers. Design of biasing and reference circuits, multistage amplifiers, and feedback circuits. Prerequisite: **321L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

330. Software Design (3)

Design of software systems using modern modeling techniques. Relationship between software design and process, with emphasis on UML and its interface application code. Exposure to design patterns, software frameworks, and software architectural paradigms. Prerequisite: 231. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

**331. Data Structures and Algorithms (3)

An introduction to data structures and algorithms. Topics include asymptotic notation recurrence relations, sorting, hash tables, basic priority queues, balanced search trees and basic graph representation and search. Prerequisite: 231 and MATH **327. Pre- or corequisite: **340. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

**335. Integrated Software Systems (3)

Course considers design principles, implementation issues, and performance evaluation of various software paradigms in an integrated computing environment. Topics include performance measurement and evaluation, program optimization for the underlying architecture, integration and security for large-scale software systems. Prerequisite: 330. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

**338. Intermediate Logic Design (3)

Advanced combinational circuits; XOR and transmission gates; computer-based optimization methods; RTL and HDL; introduction to computer aided design; advanced sequential machines; asynchronous sequential machines; timing issues; memory and memory interfacing; programmable logic devices; and VLSI concepts. Prerequisite: 238L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

**340. Probabilistic Methods in Engineering (3)

Introduction to probability, random variables, random processes, probability distribution/density functions, expectation, correlation, power spectrum, WSS processes, confidence internals, transmission through LTI, applications of probability.  Prerequisite: 300. Pre- or corequisite: **314. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall, Spring}

341. Introduction to Communication Systems (3)

Amplitude/frequency modulation, pulse position/amplitude modulation, probabilistic noise model, AWGN, Rice representation, figure of merit, phase locked loops, digital modulation, introduction to multiple access systems. Prerequisite: **314 and **340. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

**344L. Microprocessors (4)

Computers and Microprocessors: architecture, assembly language programming, input/output and applications. Three lectures, 3 hours lab. Prerequisite: 206L and 238L and **321L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall, Spring}

345. Introduction to Control Systems (3)

Introduction to the feedback control problem. Modeling of dynamic systems in frequency and time domains. Transient and steady-state response analyses. Stability concepts. Root-locus techniques. Design via gain adjustment. Frequency response techniques. Nyquist criterion, stability margins.  Prerequisite: **314. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

360 [**360]. Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (4 [3])

Maxwell’s equations, plane wave propagation, waveguides and transmission lines, transient pulse propagation and elementary dipole antenna. Prerequisite: 213 and MATH 2530 and PHYS 1320. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

**371. Materials and Devices (3)

Introduction to quantum mechanics, crystal structures, insulators, metals, and semiconductor material properties, PN junction, field effect devices.  Prerequisite: 300 and PHYS 2310. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

381. Introduction to Electric Power Systems (3)

Provides in-depth look at various elements of power systems including power generation, transformer action, transmission line modeling, symmetrical components, pf correction, real/quadrature power calculations, load flow analysis and economic considerations in operating systems. Prerequisite: 213. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

412. Introduction to Computer Graphics: Scanline Algorithms (3)

(Also offered as CS 412) This course is an introduction to the technical aspects of raster algorithms in computer graphics. Students will learn the foundational concepts of 2-D and 3-D graphics as they relate to real-time and offline techniques. Students will develop a video game as a final project to demonstrate the algorithms learned in class. Prerequisite: **331 or CS 361L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

419. Senior Design I (3)

Design methodology and development of professional project oriented skills including communication, team management, economics and engineering ethics. Working in teams, a proposal for a large design is prepared in response to an industrial or in-house sponsor. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering, and senior standing. {Fall, Spring}

420. Senior Design II (3)

Continuation of 419. Students work in teams to implement 419 proposal. Prototypes are built and tested to sponsor specifications, and reports made to sponsor in addition to a Final Report and Poster Session presentation. Prerequisite: 419 Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering, and senior standing. {Fall, Spring}

421 / 523. Analog Electronics (3)

Design of advanced analog electronic circuits. BJT and MOSFET operational amplifiers, current mirrors and output stages. Frequency response and compensation. Noise. A/D and D/A converters. Prerequisite: **322L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

424 / 520. VLSI Design (3)

Advanced topics include: lC technologies, CAD tools, gate arrays, standard cells and full custom designs. Design of memories, PLA, I/0 and random logic circuit. Design for testability.  Prerequisite: **321L and **338. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

*435 [**435]. Software Engineering (3)

Management and technical issues including business conduct and ethics related to the design of large engineering projects. Student teams will address the design, specification, implementation, testing and documentation of a large hardware/software project. Prerequisite: **335. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

*437. Computer Operating Systems (3)

(Also offered as CS **481) Fundamental principles of modern operating systems design, with emphasis on concurrency and resource management. Topics include processes, interprocess communication, semaphores, monitors, message passing, input/output device, deadlocks memory management, files system design. Prerequisite: **331 or CS 341L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall, Spring}

*438. Design of Computers (3)

Computer architecture; design and implementation at HDL level; ALU, exception handling and interrupts; addressing; memory; speed issues; pipelining; microprogramming; introduction to distributed and parallel processing; buses; bus protocols and bus masters. CAD project to include written and oral presentations. Prerequisite: **338 and **344L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

*439. Introduction to Digital Signal Processing (3)

Bilateral Z transforms, region of convergence, review of sampling theorem, aliasing, the discrete Fourier transform and properties, analysis/design of FIR/IIR filters, FFT algorithms spectral analysis using FFT. Prerequisite: MATH 1522.

*440. Introduction to Computer Networks (3)

(Also offered as CS **485) Theoretical and practical study of computer networks, including network structures and architectures. Principles of digital communications systems. Network topologies, protocols and services. TCP/IP protocol suite. Point-to-point networks; broadcast networks; local area networks; routing, error and flow control techniques. Prerequisite: 330. Pre- or corequisite: **340. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

*442. Introduction to Wireless Communications (3)

The course is an introduction to cellular telephone systems and wireless networks, drawing upon a diversity of electrical engineering areas. Topics include cellular concepts, radio propagation, modulation methods and multiple access techniques. Prerequisite: 341. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

*443. Hardware Design with VHDL (3)

The VHDL hardware description language is used for description of digital systems at several levels of complexity, from the system level to the gate level. Descriptions provide a mechanism for documentation, for simulation and for synthesis. Prerequisite: **338. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

*446. Design of Feedback Control Systems (3)

Introduction to design of feedback control systems. Design of compensators in the frequency and time domains. PID control and tuning. Digital implementation of analog controllers. Sensitivity and robust performance. Laboratory exercises using Matlab/Simulink and LabVIEW.  Prerequisite: 345. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

460 / 560. Introduction to Microwave Engineering (3)

This lecture/laboratory course provides essential fundamentals for rf, wireless and microwave engineering. Topics include: wave propagation in cables, waveguides and free space; impedance matching, standing wave ratios, Z- and S- parameters. Prerequisite: **360. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

*463. Advanced Optics I (3)

(Also offered as PHYC *463) Electromagnetic theory of geometrical optics, Gaussian ray tracing and matrix methods, finite ray tracing, aberrations, interference and diffraction. Prerequisite: PHYC **302. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

*464. Laser Physics (3)

(Also offered as PHYC *464) Resonator optics. Rate equations; spontaneous and stimulated emission; gas, semiconductor and solid state lasers, pulsed and mode-locked laser techniques. Prerequisite: **360 or PHYC *406. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

469 / 569. Antennas for Wireless Communication Systems (3)

Aspects of antenna theory and design; radiation from dipoles, loops, apertures, microstrip antennas and antenna arrays. Prerequisite: **360. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

*471. Materials and Devices II (3)

An intermediate study of semiconductor materials, energy band structure, p-n junctions, ideal and non-ideal effects in field effect and bipolar transistors. Prerequisite: **371. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

474L / 574L. Microelectronics Processing (3)

(Also offered as NSMS 574L) Materials science of semiconductors, microelectronics technologies, device/circuit fabrication, parasitics and packaging. Lab project features small group design/fabrication/testing of MOS circuits. Pre- or corequisite: **371. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

*475. Introduction to Electro-Optics and Opto-Electronics (3)

Basic electro-optics and opto-electronics, with engineering applications. Interaction of light with matter. Introduction to optics of dielectrics, metals and crystals. Introductory descriptions of electro-optic, acousto-optic and magneto-optic effects and related devices. Light sources, displays and detectors. Elementary theory and applications of lasers, optical waveguides and fibers. Prerequisite: **371. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

482 / 582. Electric Drives and Transformers (3)

Electromagnetic theory and mechanical considerations are employed to develop models for and understanding of Transformers, Induction Machines and Synchronous Machines. Additionally, DC Machines are discussed. Prerequisite: 381. Pre- or corequisite: **360. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

483 / 583. Power Electronics I (3)

Introduces modern power conversion techniques at a lower level, dealing with basic structures of power converters and techniques of analyzing converter circuits. Students learn to analyze and design suitable circuits and subsystems for practical applications. Prerequisite: **322L and 381. Pre- or corequisite: **371. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

484 / 584. Photovoltaics (3)

Technical concepts of photovoltaics. Solar cell device level operation, packaging, manufacturing, designing phovoltaic system for stand-alone or grid-tied operation, some business-case analysis and some real-life scenarios of applicability of these solutions. Prerequisite: 381. Pre- or corequisite: **371. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

488 / 588. Smart Grid Technologies (3)

A detailed study of current and emerging power and energy systems and technologies. Including renewable energies, storage, Smart Grid concepts, security for power infrastructure. Software modeling of power systems and grids. Prerequisite: 381. Pre- or corequisite: 482 and 483 and 484. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Fall}

489 / 589. Power Electronics II (3)

Analysis and design of practical power electronic circuits and grid or off-grid inverters. Operation and specification of power devices such as diodes, MOSFETS, IGBTs, SCRs, inductors, and transformers. Simulation of converters using SPICE. Prerequisite: 381 and (482 or 582). Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering. {Spring}

490. Internship (3)

Professional practice under the guidance of a practicing engineer. Assignments include design or analysis of systems or hardware, or computer programming. A preliminary proposal and periodic reports are required. The engineer evaluates student’s work; a faculty monitor assigns grade (12 hours/week) (24 hours/week in summer session). Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering, and junior standing.

491. Undergraduate Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Registration for more than 3 hours requires permission of department chairperson. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

493. Honors Seminar (1-3)

A special seminar open only to honors students. Registration requires permission of department chairperson. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

494. Honors Individual Study (1-6)

Open only to honors students. Registration requires permission of the department chairperson and of the supervising professor. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering.

495 / 595. Special Topics (1-4 to a maximum of 9, 1-4 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

Restriction: admitted to B.S.Cp.E. Computer Engineering or B.S.E.E. Electrical Engineering, and senior standing.

500. Theory of Linear Systems (3)

State space representation of dynamical systems. Analysis and design of linear models in control systems and signal processing. Continuous, discrete and sampled representations. This course is fundamental for students in the system areas.

506. Optimization Theory (3)

Introduction to the topic of optimization by the computer. Linear and nonlinear programming. The simplex method, Karmakar method, gradient, conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods, Fibonacci/Golden search, Quadratic and Cubic fitting methods, Penalty and Barrier methods.

510. Medical Imaging (3)

This course will introduce the student to medical imaging modalities (e.g. MRI, Nuclear Imaging, Ultrasound) with an emphasis on a signals and systems approach. Topics will include hardware, signal formation, image reconstruction and application.

511. Analysis Methods in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3)

This course will be an introduction to signal and image processing methods for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain.

512. Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)

(Also offered as CS 512) Covers image synthesis techniques from perspective of high-end scanline rendering, including physically-based rendering algorithms. Topics: radiometry, stochastic ray tracing, variance reduction, photon mapping, reflection models, participating media, advanced algorithms for light transport.

514. Nonlinear and Adaptive Control (3)

Linearization of nonlinear systems. Phase-plane analysis. Lyapunov stability analysis. Hyperstability and Popov stability criterion. Adaptive control systems. Adaptive estimation. Stability of adaptive control systems, backstepping and nonlinear designs. Prerequisite: 500.

516. Computer Vision (3)

Theory and practice of feature extraction, including edge, texture and shape measures. Picture segmentation; relaxation. Data structures for picture description. Matching and searching as models of association and knowledge learning. Formal models of picture languages.

517. Machine Learning (3)

Decision functions and dichotomization; prototype classification and clustering; statistical classification and Bayes theory; trainable deterministic and statistical classifiers. Feature transformations and selection.

519. Theory, Fabrication, and Characterization of Nano and Microelectromechanical Systems (NEMS/MEMS) (4)

(Also offered as ME 419/519; NSMS 519)  Lectures and laboratory projects on physical theory, design, analysis, fabrication, and characterization of micro and nanosystems. Special attention given to scaling effects involved with operation of devices at nano and microscale.

520 / 424. VLSI Design (3)

Advanced topics include: lC technologies, CAD tools, gate arrays, standard cells and full custom designs. Design of memories, PLA, I/0 and random logic circuit. Design for testability.  Prerequisite: **321L and **338.

522. Hardware Software Codesign with FPGAs (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course provides an introduction to the design of electronic systems that incorporate both hardware and software components. Prerequisite: *443.

523 / 421. Analog Electronics (3)

Design of advanced analog electronics circuits. BJT and MOSFET operational amplifiers, current mirrors and output stages. Frequency response and compensation. Noise. A/D and D/A converters.

525. Hardware-Oriented Security and Trust (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course provides an introduction to hardware security and trust primitives and their application to secure and trustworthy hardware systems.

529. Introduction to Technical Cybersecurity (3)

This course will cover introductory material around technical cybersecurity in the internet of things. We will cover host-based attacks, network attacks, fuzzing, web attacks, and defenses thereof. Students in this course should have an undergraduate-level (or equivalent) education in Computer Engineering or Computer Science.

530. Cloud Computing (3)

This course provides an introduction to the techniques and technologies used in cloud computing. It consists of independent and intensive hands-on labs. The course emphasizes on architecture and the development of Web services. Prerequisite: *440 or 540.

531. Introduction to the Internet of Things (3)

This course is an introduction to the Internet of Things (IoT), focusing on integration with cloud technologies, common IoT communication protocols, and embedded Linux.

533. Digital Image Processing (3)

Fundamentals of 2D signals and systems. Introduction to multidimensional signal processing. Applications in digital image processing. Image formation, representation and display. Linear and nonlinear operators in multiple dimensions. Orthogonal transforms representation and display. Image analysis, enhancement, restoration and coding. Students will carry out image processing projects.

534. Plasma Physics I (3)

(Also offered as PHYC 534) Plasma parameters, adiabatic invariants, orbit theory, plasma oscillations, hydromagnetic waves, plasma transport, stability, kinetic theory, nonlinear effects, applications.

565. Satellite Communications (3)

Satellite communication systems provide vital and economical fixed and mobile communication services over large coverage areas. In this course, students learn the fundamentals and techniques for the design and analysis of satellite communication systems. Prerequisite: 341 and (560/460 or 569/469).

536. Computer System Software (3)

Course considers design principles, implementation issues and performance evaluation of system software in advanced computing environments. Topics include resource allocation and scheduling, information service provider and manipulation, multithreading and concurrency, security for parallel and distributed systems.

537. Foundations of Computing (3)

Computational aspects of engineering problems. Topics include machine models and computability, classification and performance analysis of algorithms, advanced data structures, approximation algorithms, introduction to complexity theory and complexity classes.

538. Advanced Computer Architecture (3)

Course provides an in-depth analysis of computer architecture techniques. Topics include high speed computing techniques, memory systems, pipelining, vector machines, parallel processing, multiprocessor systems, high-level language machines and data flow computers.

539. Digital Signal Processing (3)

Hilbert spaces, orthogonal basis, generalized sampling theorem, multirate systems, filterbanks, quantization, structures for LTI systems, finite word-length effects, linear prediction, min/max phase systems, multiresolution signal analysis.

540. Advanced Networking Topics (3)

Research, design and implementation of high-performance computer networks and distributed systems. High speed networking technologies, multimedia networks, enterprise network security and management, client/server database applications, mobile communications and state-of-the-art internetworking solutions.

541. Probability Theory and Stochastic Processes (3)

Axiomatic probability theory, projection theorem for Hilbert spaces, conditioned expectations, modes of stochastic convergence, Markov chains, mean-square calculus, Wiener filtering, optimal signal estimation, prediction stationarity, ergodicity, transmission through linear and nonlinear systems, sampling.

542. Digital Communication Theory (3)

Elements of information theory and source coding, digital modulation techniques, signal space representation, optimal receivers for coherent/non-coherent detection in AWGN channels, error probability bounds, channel capacity, elements of block and convolutional coding, fading, equalization signal design. Prerequisite: 541.

546. Multivariable Control Theory (3)

Hermite, Smith and Smith-McMillan canonic forms for polynomial and rational matrices. Coprime matrix-fraction representations for rational matrices. Bezout identity. Poles and zeros for multivariable systems. Matrix-fraction approach to feedback system design. Optimal linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) control. Multivariable Nyquist stability criteria. Prerequisite: 500.

549. Information Theory and Coding (3)

An introduction to information theory. Fundamental concepts such as entropy, mutual information, and the asymptotic equipartition property are introduced. Additional topics include data compression, communication over noisy channels, algorithmic information theory, and applications. Prerequisite: 340 or equivalent.

551. Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 9 Δ)



554. Advanced Optics II (3)

(Also offered as PHYC 554) Diffractions theory, coherence theory, coherent objects, and incoherent imaging, and polarization.

555. Foundations of Engineering Electromagnetics (3)

Mathematical foundations for engineering electromagnetics: linear analysis and method of moments, complex analysis and Kramers-Kronig relations, Green’s functions, spectral representation method and electromagnetic sources.

557. Pulsed Power and Charged Particle Acceleration (3)

Principles of pulsed power circuits, components, systems and their relationship to charged particle acceleration and transport. Energy storage, voltage multiplication, pulse shaping, insulation and breakdown and switching. Single particle dynamics and accelerator configurations.

558. Charged Particle Beams and High Power Microwaves (3)

Overview of physics of particle beams and applications at high-current and high-energy. Topics include review of collective physics, beam emittance, space-charge forces, transport at high power levels, and application to high power microwave generation. Prerequisite: 557.

559. Internship in Optical Science and Engineering (3)

(Also offered as PHYC 559) Students do research and/or development work at a participating industry or government laboratory in any area of optical science and engineering.

560 / 460. Introduction to Microwave Engineering (3)

This lecture/laboratory course provides essential fundamentals for rf, wireless and microwave engineering. Topics include: wave propagation in cables, waveguides and free space; impedance matching, standing wave ratios, Z- and S- parameters.

561. Engineering Electromagnetics (3)

Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic interaction with materials, the wave equation, plane wave propagation, wave reflection and transmission, vector potentials and radiation equations, electromagnetic field theorems, wave propagation in anisotropic media and metamaterials, period structures, dielectric slab waveguides. Prerequisite: 555.

562. Electronics RF Design (3)

Course will cover rf design techniques using transmission lines, strip lines and solid state devices. It will include the design of filters and matching elements required for realizable high frequency design. Amplifiers, oscillators and phase lock loops are covered from a rf perspective.

563. Computational Methods for Electromagnetics (3)

Computational techniques for partial differential and integral equations: finite-difference, finite-element, method of moments. Applications include transmission lines, resonators, waveguides, integrated circuits, solid-state device modeling, electromagnetic scattering and antennas. Prerequisite: 561.

564. Guided Wave Optics (3)

Optical propagation in free space, colored dielectrics, metals, semiconductors, crystals, graded index media. Radiation and guided modes in complex structures. Input and output coupling, cross-coupling mode conversion. Directional couplers, modulators, sources and detectors.

565. Optical Communication Components and Subsystems (3)

Optical waveguides, optical fiber attenuation and dispersion, power launching and coupling of light, mechanical and fiber lifetime issues, photoreceivers, digital on-off keying, modulation methods, SNR and BER, QAM and M-QAM, modulation methods, SNR, and BER, intersymbol interference (impact on SNR), clock and data recovery issues, point-to-point digital links, optical amplifiers theory and design (SOA, EDFA, and SRA), simple WDM system concepts, WDM components.

568. Avalanche Photodiodes (3)

Avalanche photodiode technologies and concepts; linear-mode and Geiger-mode applications; system-level performance metrics; statistics of the multiplication factor and buildup time; device modeling; device design, fabrication and characterization. Prerequisite: *471 or *475.

569 / 469. Antennas for Wireless Communications Systems (3)

Aspects of antenna theory and design; radiation from dipoles, loops, apertures, microstrip antennas and antenna arrays.

570. Optoelectronic Semiconductor Materials and Devices (3)

Theory and operation of optoelectronic semiconductor devices; semiconductor alloys, epitaxial growth, relevant semiconductor physics (recombination processes, heterojunctions, noise, impact ionization), analysis of the theory and practice of important OE semiconductor devices (LEDs, Lasers, Photodetectors, Solar Cells). Prerequisite: 471 or 572.

572. Semiconductor Physics (3)

Sigmon Crystal properties, symmetry and imperfections. Energy bands, electron dynamics, effective mass tensor, concept and properties of holes. Equilibrium distributions, density of states, Fermi energy and transport properties including Boltzmann’s equation. Continuity equation, diffusion and drift of carriers. Prerequisite: *471.

574L / 474L. Microelectronics Processing (3)

(Also offered as NSMS 574L) Materials science of semiconductors, microelectronics technologies, device/circuit fabrication, parasitics and packaging. Lab project features small group design/fabrication/testing of MOS circuits. Pre- or corequisite: **371.

576. Modern VLSI Devices (3)

Review of the evolution of VLSI technology and basic device physics. Detailed analysis of MOSFET devices, CMOS device design including device scaling concepts. Prerequisite: 471 or 572.

577. Fundamentals of Semiconductor LEDs and Lasers (3)

Carrier generation and recombination, photon generation and loss in laser cavities, density of optical modes and blackbody radiation, radiative and non-radiative processes, optical gain, spontaneous and stimulated emission, Fermi’s golden rule, gain and current relations, characterizing real diode lasers, dynamic effects, rate equation; small signal and large signal analysis, radiative intensity noise and linewidth. Prerequisite: 572.

581. Colloidal Nanocrystals for Biomedical Applications (3)

(Also offered as BME, NSMS 581) Intended for students planning careers combining engineering, materials science, and biomedical sciences. Covers synthesis, nanocrystals characterization, biofunctionalization, biomedical nanosensors, FRET-based nanosensing, molecular-level sensing/imaging, and applications in cell biology, cancer diagnostics and therapy, neuroscience, and drug delivery.

582 / 482. Electric Drives and Transformers (3)

Electromagnetic theory and mechanical considerations are employed to develop models for and understanding of Transformers, Induction Machines and Synchronous Machines. Additionally, DC Machines are discussed. Prerequisite: 381. Pre- or corequisite: **360.

583 / 483. Power Electronics I (3)

Introduces modern power conversion techniques at a lower level, dealing with basic structures of power converters and techniques of analyzing converter circuits. Students learn to analyze and design suitable circuits and subsystems for practical applications. Prerequisite: **322L and 381. Pre- or corequisite: **371.

584 / 484. Photovoltaics (3)

Technical concepts of photovoltaics. Solar cell device level operation, packaging, manufacturing, designing phovoltaic system for stand-alone or grid-tied operation, some business-case analysis and some real-life scenarios of applicability of these solutions. Prerequisite: 381. Pre- or corequisite: **371.

588 / 488. Smart Grid Technologies (3)

A detailed study of current and emerging power and energy systems and technologies. Including renewable energies, storage, Smart Grid concepts, security for power infrastructure. Software modeling of power systems and grids. Prerequisite: 381. Pre- or corequisite: 582 and 583 and 584.

589 / 489. Power Electronics II (3)

Analysis and design of practical power electronic circuits and grid or off-grid inverters. Operation and specification of power devices such as diodes, MOSFETS, IGBTs, SCRs, inductors, and transformers. Simulation of converters using SPICE. Prerequisite: 381 and (582 or 482).

590. Graduate Seminar (1 to a maximum of 2 Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

594. Complex Systems Theory (3)

Advanced topics in complex systems including but not limited to biological systems social and technological networks, and complex dynamics.

595 / 495. Special Topics (1-4 to a maximum of 15, 1-4 to a maximum of 9 Δ)



599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

620. Topics in Interdisciplinary Biological and Biomedical Sciences (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH 620, BIOL 520, CS 520, STAT 520) Varying interdisciplinary topics taught by collaborative scientists from UNM, SFI, and LANL.

633. Advanced Topics in Image Processing (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Advanced topics including but not limited to computational, mathematical, multi-scale, and spatial statistical methods for multi-dimensional signal processing, multi-spectral imagery, image and video processing.

637. Topics in Algorithms (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Advanced topics including advanced computer architecture, networks, distributed computing, large-scale resource management, high-performance computing and grid-based computing. Prerequisite: 537.

638. Topics in Architecture and Systems (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Advanced topics including advanced computer architecture, networks, distributed computing, large-scale resource management, high-performance computing and grid-based computing. Prerequisite: 538.

642. Detection and Estimation Theory (3)

Hypothesis testing; Karhunen-Loeve representation; optimal detection of discrete- and continuous-time signals; ML, MMSE, and MAP estimation; sufficient statistics, estimation error bounds; Wiener and Kalman-Bucy filtering; detection/receivers for multiuser and multipath fading channels. Prerequisite: 541.

649. Topics in Control Systems (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Prerequisite: 546.

651. Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 9 Δ)



661. Topics in Electromagnetics (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics include advanced antenna theory, electromagnetic scattering and propagation, electromagnetic compatibility, low temperature plasma science, advanced plasma physics, and other subjects in applied electromagnetics. Prerequisite: 561.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Early Childhood Education (ECED)


1110 [FCS 101]. Child Growth, Development, and Learning (3)

This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children, prenatal through age eight, provides students with the theoretical foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals. The course includes knowledge of how young children grow, develop and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all domains of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive and language. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development and learning is emphasized.

1115 [FCS 103]. Health, Safety, and Nutrition (2)

This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well being, sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments. {Fall}

1120 [FCS 115]. Guiding Young Children (3)

This course explores various theories of child guidance and the practical applications of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Strategies for preventing challenging behaviors through the use of environment, routines and schedule will be presented Emphasis is placed on helping children become self- responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learners and including families as part of the guidance approach.

1125 [FCS 220]. Assessment of Children and Evaluation of Programs (3)

This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation of typically and non-typically developing children. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation instruments to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals and families in the process.

1130 [FCS 111]. Family and Community Collaboration (3)

This beginning course examines the involvement of families and communities from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with families in early childhood settings is discussed. Families’ goals and desires for their children will be supported through culturally responsive strategies.

2110 [FCS 230]. Professionalism (2)

This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined.

2115 [FCS 202]. Introduction to Language, Literacy, and Reading [Introduction to Reading, Language and Literacy] (3)

This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children’s emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach, the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children’s oral language development, phonemic awareness, and literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. . This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. Instructional approaches and theory-based and research based strategies to support the emergent literacy and reading skills of native speakers and English language learners will be presented. This is a basic course in children’s emergent literacy and reading development: Ways to foster phonemic awareness, literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and language development are explored.

2120 [FCS 117]. Curriculum Development through Play: Birth through Age 4 (PreK) [Curriculum Development through Play: Birth through Age 4] (3)

The beginning curriculum course places play at the center of curriculum in developmentally appropriate early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Corequisite: 2121.

2121 [FCS 117L]. Curriculum Development through Play: Birth through Age 4 (PreK) Practicum [Practicum: Birth through Age 4] (2)

The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with the course Curriculum Development through Play – Birth through Age 4. The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address curriculum content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IFSPs is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Prerequisite: 1110. Corequisite: 2120.

2130 [FCS 217]. Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 (PreK) through Grade 3 [Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 through Grade 3] (3)

The curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of IEPs is included. Corequisite: 2131.

2131 [FCS 217L]. Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 (PreK) through Grade 3 Practicum [Practicum: Age 3 to Grade 3] (2)

The beginning practicum course is a corequisite with 2130. The field based component of this course will provide experiences that address developmentally appropriate curriculum content. Prerequisite: 1110. Corequisite: 2130.

2240 [FCS 203]. Infant Toddler Growth and Development: Prenatal to Age 3 [Infant Growth and Development] (3)

Provides both basic knowledge of typically and atypically developing young children from the prenatal period to 36 months and a foundational understanding for the promotion of the health, well- being and development of all infants and toddlers within the context of family, community and cultural environments. The course examines infancy and toddlerhood with an emphasis on the interrelationship of cognitive, physical, social and emotional development, mental health and early parent-child relationships. Students must complete the practicum hours to pass this course.




Economics (ECON)


2110 [105]. Macroeconomic Principles [Introductory Macroeconomics] (3)

Macroeconomics is the study of national and global economies. Topics include output, unemployment and inflation; and how they are affected by financial systems, fiscal and monetary policies. Prerequisite for most upper-division courses. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences. 

2120 [106]. Microeconomic Principles [Introductory Microeconomics] (3)

This course will provide a broad overview of microeconomics. Microeconomics is the study of issues specific to households, firms, or industries with an emphasis on the role of markets. Topics discussed will include household and firm behavior, demand and supply, government intervention, market structures, and the efficient allocation of resources. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

2125 [203]. Society and Environment [Society and the Environment] (3)

Introduces students to environmental and natural resource issues of both global and local scale. No prior economics coursework is required; basic economic tools will be introduced and then applied to a variety of environmental problems. This course will cover a variety of topics, including water & energy conservation, pollution taxes, tradable pollution permits and global warming.

2130 [212]. Personal Investing (3)

This is an economics course with no pre-requisites. Consequently it should be considered introductory, however it offers a wide-ranging overview of personal finance and the role financial assets can play in achieving personal financial goals. This course won’t make you a millionaire, nor will it prepare you for a career as a hedge-fund manager. The goal is to increase your understanding of how financial markets work, and how to use financial assets as part of a life-long financial strategy. Your understanding of financial markets will be enhanced by learning the tools of economics, incorporating knowledge of human behavior, and becoming familiar with particular aspects of financial markets and assets.

2220 [239]. Economics of Race and Gender (3)

The aim of this course is to introduce you to how economics studies some of the main issues affecting men and women of different ethnic or racial backgrounds. Using economic theory as our framework for analysis, our discussions will include analysis of evidence and policies that address the issues at hand. Among the questions we will be addressing in this class are: why do women earn less than men, and blacks less than whites? Why has the labor force participation of women increased over the past half century, while black men’s has decreased? How does marriage affect women’s decision to work? How has the American family changed over the past century, among others.

2996 [295]. Topics in Economics and Social Issues (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Topics will vary but all introduce students to economics approaches by studying contemporary and historical social issues.

300 [**300]. Intermediate Microeconomics I (3)

Intermediate analysis of microeconomic theory and concepts. Topics include consumer behavior and demand, production and costs, price and output under both perfect competition and pure monopoly. Prerequisite: 2110 and 2120 and (307 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512).

303 [**303]. Intermediate Macroeconomics I (3)

Theories of national income determination in explaining business cycles; aggregate supply; and the role of expectations. Role of monetary and fiscal policies in stabilizing the economy. Prerequisite: 2110 and 2120 and (307 or MATH 1430 or MATH 1512).

307. Economics Tools (3)

Introduces math, data and writing skills that are essential for understanding, interpreting and communicating economics concepts. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1240 or ACT Math =>26 or SAT Math Section =>620 or ACCUPLACER College-Level Math =>100. Pre- or corequisite: 2110 or 2120.

309 [**309]. Introductory Statistics and Econometrics (3)

Introductory statistics, probability, probability distributions and hypothesis testing. Basic econometric techniques emphasizing estimation of economic relationships and the use of econometric models in forecasting. Prerequisite: 2110 and 2120 and MATH 1350.

315 [**315]. Money and Banking (3)

Principles of money, credit and banking; organization and operation of the banking system; and the relationship between money, banking and the level of economic activity. Prerequisite: 303.

*320. Labor Economics (3)

Determinants of labor force, wage levels and structures, and employment; human capital theory and discrimination, economic consequences of trade union and government intervention. Prerequisite: 300.

*321. Development Economics (3)

Theories of development and growth. Problems facing developing countries and possible solutions. Historical case studies of some developing countries. Prerequisite: 300 or 303.

*330. Consumer Economics (3)

Introduces the theory of consumer behavior and demand analysis. Empirical applications of consumer theory will be explored. Possible topics include: consumer safety, family budgeting, marketing research and the household production function approach. Prerequisite: 300.

*331. Economics of Poverty and Discrimination (3)

Explores trends in income distribution especially across and within groups and examines theories explaining behavior and outcomes. Public policy concerning poverty and discrimination is studied and discussed. Prerequisite: 300.

*332. Economics of Regulation (3)

Nature of modern firms and markets: relationship of market structure, conduct and performance, including analysis of antitrust policy, public utility regulation and “deregulation” of some industries. Prerequisite: 300.

*333. Industrial Organization (3)

Firms and markets; interactions of firms in markets that are noncompetitive (oligopolistic and monopolistic); various government policies to control the behavior of firms with market power. Prerequisite: 300.

*335. Health Economics (3)

Market concepts and health care issues. Economic assessment of the U.S. health care system. Explores physician supply and demand, hospitals, malpractice, pharmaceuticals, insurance and related topics. Prerequisite: 2110 and 2120.

*341. Urban and Regional Economics (3)

Spatial nature of economics: housing markets, natural hazard and technological risks, local and regional public finance, transportation issues, environmental problems and the relationship of regional and urban economies to national and international economies. Prerequisite: 300.

342. Environmental Economics (3)

Introduction to economics of environmental management problems, conceptual tools and policy applications: resource scarcity and sustainability, efficiency and equity, property rights and externalities, benefit-cost analysis and discounting, provision of public goods and nonmarket valuation. Prerequisite: 2110 and 2120.

*343. Natural Resource Economics (3)

Use and management of natural resources and systems useful to humans. Issues include: why natural resources are important, economic growth impact, optimal exploitation and identification and management of environmental concerns. Prerequisite: 300.

*350. Public Finance (3)

Taxation, governmental borrowing, financial administration and public expenditures. Prerequisite: 300.

*360. History of Economic Thought (3)

Development of the principle economic doctrines and schools of economic thought from the Physiocrats to Keynes. Prerequisite: 2110 and 2120.

*369. Problem-Based Learning Using Data Analytics (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Interdisciplinary STEM course examining real world problems like those faced by underserved communities (poverty, environment, education, and health) using empirical tools, public policy perspectives. Students use data analytical tools to explore implementable solutions. Topics vary. Prerequisite: MATH 1350.

395. Seminar in Current Economic Issues (1-3, no limit Δ)

Topics will vary. Offered on an occasional basis. For course content, consult the Economics department. Prerequisite: 300 and 303.

*403. Intermediate Macroeconomics II (3)

Theories of consumption, investment and money demand. Models of economic growth. Introduction to open economy macroeconomics. Macro modeling and analysis of economic policies, using actual data and computer models. Prerequisite: 303.

*407. Mathematical Methods in Economics (3)

A survey course designed to develop those mathematical results and methods which find frequent use in economic analysis. Prerequisite: 300 and 303.

*408. Economic Forecasting Methods: A Time Series Approach (3)

Computer modeling of economic time series using univariate Box-Jenkins models and multivariate vector autoregressive models. Intervention models to assess policy impacts such as gun control, environmental law, tax changes and social programs. Prerequisite: 309.

*409. Intermediate Econometrics (3)

Intermediate econometric techniques with strong emphasis on computer modeling of applied economic problems. Covers autocorrelation, heteroscedasticity, multicollinearity, dummy variable and distributed lag model and the use of econometric models in forecasting. Prerequisite: 309.

*410. Topics in Health Economics (3, no limit Δ)

Specialized topics in health care economics including medical education, national health insurance, comparative systems, drug industry and other contemporary issues. Emphasis on empirical applications in the study of health care issues. For course content, consult the Economics department. Prerequisite: 300 and 309 and **335.

*423. Topics in Latin American Development (3)

Analysis of economic development and its relation to poverty, schooling, the informal sector, agrarian issues and sustainable development using case studies from Latin America. Prerequisite: 300 and 309.

*424. International Trade (3)

Determinants of patterns of international trade and comparative advantage. Trade restrictions and gains from trade. International factor movements. Prerequisite: 300 and 309.

*427. Topics in Labor Economics (3)

Wage theory, industrial relations, migration, discrimination, comparative labor problems, special groups in the work force and other contemporary topics. Emphasis on economic implications and the role of public policy in these labor topics. Prerequisite: 309 and *320.

*429. International Finance (3)

Foreign exchange markets and the international financial system. Exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustment and the effectiveness of government policies in the open economy. International monetary system. Prerequisite: (303 or 315) and 309.

*442. Topics in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3)

Focus on public policy and regulation. Specialized issues such as development and management of water, mineral, energy, air quality, forest and fishery resources, resource scarcity, sustainability, non-stationary pollution, water quality and global resource distribution. Prerequisite: 300 and 309.

*445. Topics in Public Finance (3)

Intermediate public finance. Public economics topics: taxation, expenditure, welfare and distribution. Concentration on selected topics such as crime, education, health, regulations (EPA Acts), agreements (NAFTA) and the courts (Takings Clause). Prerequisite: 300 and 309 and *350.

451. Independent Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

For senior students wishing to study topics not covered in an existing course or in more detail. Requirements will be agreed upon between student and instructor. Prerequisite: 300 and 303 and 309.

*466. Public Sector Project Analysis (3)

Product evaluation, cost-benefit analysis, capital budgeting, financing, federal-state relationships, environmental and public welfare impacts of projects and other related issues. Prerequisite: 300 and *350.

*478. Seminar in International Studies (3)

(Also offered as POLS *478) Designed to provide seniors from any discipline an opportunity to apply an international perspective to their undergraduate training. Each student will present a term project drawing upon his or her particular background and relating it to international matters. Restriction: senior standing.

498. Reading for Honors (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Open to juniors or seniors with an overall grade point average of at least 3.2 and approval of the department. Prerequisite: 309. Restriction: junior or senior standing and permission of department.

499. Senior Honors Thesis (4)

Prerequisite: 498.

501. Microeconomics I (3)

Topics include producer and consumer theory, duality and welfare measures, competitive markets and monopoly and decision making under uncertainty. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Economics or Ph.D. Economics.

504. Mathematical Tools and Economic Models (3)

Calculus and matrix theory as applied to macro and micro models. Unconstrained and constrained optimization; static and comparative static analysis; introduction to dynamic analysis. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Economics or Ph.D. Economics.

506. Macroeconomics I (3)

Closed and open economy macroeconomics. Aggregate demand and supply. Different models of business cycles. Micro foundations of macroeconomics. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Economics or Ph.D. Economics.

508. Statistics and Introduction to Econometrics (3)

Discrete and continuous probability distributions; expectations; joint, conditional marginal distributions; hypothesis testing; least squares estimators; violation of the least squares principle. Econometric software with applications. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Economics or Ph.D. Economics.

509. Econometrics I (3)

Theory and applications: ordinary and generalized least squares, hypothesis testing, dummy variable and distributed lag models; simultaneous equation and two stage least square models; forecasting. Emphasis on computer modeling. Prerequisite: 508.

510. Econometrics II (3)

Simultaneous equation methods, nonlinear least squares, maximum likelihood method, qualitative dependent variable models, asymptotic properties and test statistics. Emphasis on computer modeling. Prerequisite: 509.

513. Microeconomics II (3)

Competitive equilibrium and welfare economics. Topics from imperfect competition, decision making under uncertainty, introduction to game theory and distribution theory. Prerequisite: 501 and 504.

514. Macroeconomics II (3)

Dynamic macroeconomics. Optimal economic policy. Theories of economic growth. Prerequisite: 504 and 506.

533. Seminars in Industrial Organization (3)

Industrial organization is the study of firms and markets. Course covers firms internal organization and the interactions of firms in markets that are competitive, oligopolistic or monopolistic. Prerequisite: 501 and 504.

534. Experimental Economics (3)

Working markets in laboratory setting. Designing market experiments. Experimental investigations of simple market organization. Examination of more complex settings. Applications: theory, environmental, public finance and labor. Prerequisite: 501 and 504.

538. Topics in Applied Economics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Special topics in applied economics as they pertain to the major fields and support courses. Available for use by visiting faculty. Prerequisite: 501 and 504. Restriction: permission of instructor.

540. Natural Resource, Environmental, and Ecological Modeling I (3)

Dynamic optimization and optimal control theory applications (deterministic and stochastic) and computation methods with an emphasis on renewable resources. Prerequisite: 501 and 504.

542. Topics in Environmental, Resource, and Ecological Economics (3, may be repeated four times Δ)

Special topics in environmental and natural resource economics. Credit can be earned more than once, as the topic and content will vary by instructor. Prerequisite: 501.

543. Natural Resource, Environmental, and Ecological Modeling II (3)

Dynamic optimization and optimal control theory applications with an emphasis on empirical. Models of natural resource utilization. Energy, minerals, fisheries, forest resources, ground- and surface water, and environmental and ecological stocks. Prerequisite: 501 and 504.

544. Environmental Economics (3)

Causes and consequences of environmental externalities. Design and implementation of alternative policy instruments. Theory and methods to measure economic value of market and non-market environmental services. Prerequisite: 501 and 504.

545. Water Resources II: Models (4)

(Also offered as WR 572) Use of technical models in water resources management addresses conceptual formulation and practical application of models from administrators perspective. Lab focuses on use of graphic aids to explain technical information. {Spring}

546. Water Resources I: Contemporary Issues (4)

(Also offered as WR 571) Students examine contemporary issues in water resource systems, including water quality; ecosystem health; stakeholder concerns; economics; and water supply, policy, management and allocation. Emphasis on teamwork, cooperation, and oral, written and graphic communication. {Fall}

551. Independent Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An independent study course on economic problems or issues. The study is carried out under the supervision of an economics faculty member. Restriction: permission of instructor.

560. Public Economics (3)

Introduction to advanced study of public economics, including theoretical and empirical analysis of market failures and government interventions. Topics include externalities and public goods, social insurance programs, education policies, optimal taxation, income distribution, and government expenditures. Prerequisite: 501 and 508.

564. Topics in Health Economics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Applications of economic theory and empirical analysis including information and agency problems, organization of markets for health care, and influence of government policies on medical innovation and population health. Prerequisite: 509 and 513.

565. Topics in Public and Labor Economics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Advanced topics in public economics. Topics will vary; course can be repeated for credit if topics differ. Restriction: permission of instructor.

581. International Development and Finance (3)

Role of foreign direct investment, foreign aid, remittances, and other financial flows for economic development and growth. Causes and consequences of currency and financial crises in developing countries. Balance of payments problems, international debt, and structural adjustment programs. Prerequisite: 501 and 506.

582. Topics in International and Sustainable Development (3)

Topics in international/sustainable development. Emphasis on empirical modeling and analysis, using data for developing countries, including large-scale surveys. Exposure to econometric methods, simulations, GIS applications, and macro/micro-development modeling tools. Prerequisite: 501 and 506 and 510.

583. Development Economics (3)

Economic growth and development, poverty and inequality, population growth. Credit markets and microfinance, risk and insurance. Role of government in development. Urbanization and rural-urban migration. Prerequisite: 501 and 506.

584. Interdisciplinary Seminar on Problems of Modernization in Latin America (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as HIST 689, POLS, SOC 584)

585. Sustainable Development (3)

Overview of sustainable development concepts, models, and policy issues, with an emphasis on sustainable uses of all types of capital - physical, human, social, and environmental - in an international context. Prerequisite: 501 and 506.

595. Workshop in Applied Economics (1-3)

Research problems. Student presentations of methodology and results. Research projects may be student-directed or undertaken in conjunction with regular and/or visiting faculty. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: permission of instructor.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Engineering Cooperative Education Program (ECOP)


105. Cooperative Education Work Phase (0)

$10.00 annual fee. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Open to undergraduate students in the School of Engineering only.

109. Evaluation of Cooperative Education Work Phase 1 (1)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

110. Evaluation of Cooperative Education Work Phase 2 (1)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

209. Evaluation of Cooperative Education Work Phase 3 (1)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

210. Evaluation of Cooperative Education Work Phase 4 (1 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

505. Cooperative Education Work Phase (0, no limit Δ)

$10.00 annual fee. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Open to graduate students in the School of Engineering only.




Educational Psychology (EDPY)


303. Human Growth and Development (3)

Principles of human growth and development across the life span and implications for education.

310. Learning and the Classroom (3)

The basic principles of learning, particularly cognition, motivation and assessment, and their application to classroom situations.

391 / 591. Problems (1-3, no limit Δ)



393. Topics (1-6, no limit Δ)



472 / 572. Classroom Assessment (3)

Provides educators with skills in assessment and knowledge of issues in measurement and assessment. Skills necessary to understand and communicate large-scale test information are also developed.

500. Survey of Research Methods in Education (3)

Overview of quantitative and qualitative research methods for research consumers. Emphasis is on locating published research and reading research reports with critical understanding of researchers’ methods of data collection and analysis.

502. Survey of Statistics in Education (3)

Non-technical overview of statistical methods in educational research; computation is not covered. Emphasis on developing critical understanding of statistical methods and results when reading and interpreting research, not on producing research or calculating statistics. Pre- or corequisite: 500.

503. Principles of Human Development (3)

Principles of human growth and development, which include cognitive, psychosocial and physical development across the life span, with a particular focus on educational implications.

505. Conducting Quantitative Educational Research (3)

Provides students with skills for designing quantitative educational research, including identifying a problem, reviewing literature, formulating hypotheses, considering ethical issues, selecting participants, selecting or constructing measures, making valid inferences, writing reports.

510. Principles of Classroom Learning (3)

Research and theory in learning, particularly cognition, motivation and assessment, with emphasis on educational implications.

511. Introductory Educational Statistics (3)

Foundations of statistical methods for research producers. Covers sampling methods, descriptive statistics, standard scores, distributions, estimation, statistical significance testing, t-tests, correlation, chi-square and effect size using SPSS® for Windows and computation. Pre- or corequisite: 505.

515. Survey and Questionnaire Design and Analysis (3)

Covers survey research from item writing and survey development to sampling, administration, analysis and reporting. Emphasizes applications and interpretations in educational and social science research and use and interpretation of statistical software for survey research. Prerequisite: 511.

520. Motivation Theory and Practice (3)

The course promotes understanding of current theories and research in motivation with an emphasis on applications in educational settings. Strategies for establishing motivation-rich environments will be developed.

565. Seminar in Thought and Language (3)

(Also offered as LING, PSY 565) The role of language in human cognition is approached from a sociocultural framework. Topics: semiotic systems, languages of the mind, categorization, problem solving, and cognitive pluralism.

572 / 472. Classroom Assessment (3)

Provides educators with skills in assessment and knowledge of issues in measurement and assessment. Skills necessary to understand and communicate large-scale test information are also developed.

574. Introduction to Educational and Psychological Measurement (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

A survey of classical and modern approaches to measurement and assessment as applied to education and/or psychology. Includes measurement and scaling, reliability and validity, traditional and alternative assessment methods. Prerequisite: 511.

586. Psychological Development of Women (3)

Prerequisite: an introductory course in the psychology of personality. An introductory course in women studies is recommended but not essential. Prerequisite: PSY 331.

591 / 391. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 18 Δ)



593. Topics (1, no limit Δ)



595. Advanced Field Experiences (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Prerequisite: acceptance into a graduate program and permission of instructor.

598. Directed Readings (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

603. Applied Statistical Design and Analysis (3)

Includes factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA), planned comparisons, post hoc tests, trend analysis, effect size and strength of association measures, repeated measures designs. Emphasis on solving applied problems using statistical analysis with computer software. Prerequisite: 511.

604. Multiple Regression Techniques as Applied to Education (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Includes bivariate regression, multiple regression with continuous and categorical independent variables and interactions, orthogonal and nonorthogonal designs and selected post hoc analyses. Computer analysis, conceptual understanding and applications to educational research are stressed. Prerequisite: 603.

607. Structural Equation Modeling (3)

Theory, application, interpretation of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques. Includes covariance structures, path diagrams, path analysis, model identification, estimation and testing; confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modeling and linear structural relations using latent variables. Prerequisite: 604 or 606.

608. Multilevel Modeling (3)

The fundamentals of multilevel regression models, applications of such models to both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, and a survey of several advanced multilevel regression models. Prerequisite: 604.

610. Seminar in Classroom Learning (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An examination of selected research and theory on learning and cognition in specific domains with emphasis on application to classrooms or other learning situations.

613. Seminar in Human Growth and Development (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Examination of selected topics in research and theory relevant to human growth and development, including implications for instruction and child rearing. May be repeated once for credit when topics differ.

630. College Teaching Seminar (3)

This course provides an empirically-based theoretical and practical foundation for college-level teaching. Topics include: instructional strategies; teaching technologies; assessment; professional development; ethics; teaching as part of overall professional identity.

645. Advanced Seminar in Educational Psychology (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Seminar introduces students to current research topics and professional issues in Educational Psychology.

650. Dissertation Seminar (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

651. Advanced Seminar in Quantitative Educational Research (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Seminar introduces advanced students to current research designs and controversies, statistical analysis techniques and computer applications. Prerequisite: 603.

696. Internship (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

698. Directed Readings (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Education (EDUC)


1120 [101]. Introduction to Education (3)

Introduction to the historical, philosophical, sociological foundations of education, current trends, and issues in education; especially as it relates to a multicultural environment. Students will use those foundations to develop effective strategies related to problems, issues and responsibilities in the field of education. A field component at an educational site is required.

1125 [183]. Introduction to Education in New Mexico (3)

An exploration of contemporary issues around diversity, culture, and education in New Mexico. The course is of special interest to students considering a teaching career. Projects in schools and/or community sites are part of requirements.  

1996 [293]. Special Topics [Topics in Education] (1-3, no limit Δ)

Various topics related to education from an interdisciplinary perspective.

291. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

296. Internship (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



321L. Teaching Social Studies K-8 (3)

Development of conceptual framework for study of community-based curriculum with emphasis on the diverse cultures of the southwest and value clarification. Supervised work with children allows for in-depth analysis of both content and process. Three lectures, 1 hr. lab. 

330L. Teaching of Reading to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students I (3)

Study of reading process for emergent and intermediate readers focusing on: cueing systems, assessment, family and community contexts, language, culture and instruction in individual and small group settings. Lab includes supervised tutoring and discussion group.

331L. Teaching of Reading to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students II (3)

Establishing a theoretical framework for exploring various approaches to reading/language development, instruction and evaluation in multicultural classroom settings. Three lectures, 1 hr. lab.

333L. Teaching Language Arts K-8 (3)

Study of oral and written forms of language. Background theory in language development and use in teacher-child interactions is presented and followed by carefully designed experiences with children. Three lectures, 1 hr. lab.

353L. Teaching Science K-8 (3)

Methods, processes, content and management of children’s science observation, exploration, discovery and invention; attitudes of inquiry and wonderment. Science integrated with math and other areas of life. Three lectures, 1 hr. lab.

361L. Teaching Mathematics K-8 (3)

Strategies and materials appropriate for traditional and innovative instructional programs in elementary school mathematics. Supervised work with children allows for in-depth analysis of both content and process. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1118 and MATH 112 and (MATH 1220 or MATH 2118).

362. Teaching Experience I (3)

An early experience working in the schools to develop familiarity with students and the school culture. Seminar with six hours of field work weekly.

391 / 591. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

(Also offered as MSET 391)

400. Student Teaching in the Elementary School (1-2-3-6-9-12-15 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

Additional requirements are listed in previous section entitled “Student Teaching.” Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Pre- or corequisite: 321L or 331L or 333L or 353L or 361L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ed. in Elementary Education.

401L. Creating Effective K-8 Learning Environments I (1)

This course is the discussion and analysis seminar for Elementary Education majors during their first semester of Field Experience. Corequisite: 411L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ed. in Elementary Education.

402L. Creating Effective K-8 Learning Environments II (1)

This course is the discussion and analysis seminar for Elementary Education majors during their second semester of Field Experience. Prerequisite: 401L and 411L. Corequisite: 412L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ed. in Elementary Education.

403L. Using Assessment: Creating Effective K-8 Learning Environments III (1)

This course is the discussion and analysis seminar for Elementary Education majors during their third and final semester of Field Experience. Prerequisite: 402L and 412L. Corequisite: 413L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ed. in Elementary Education.

411L. K-8 Field Experience I (1)

This course is designed for planning and teaching in K-8 Schools for Elementary Education majors in their first semester of Field Experience. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.  Prerequisite: 1120 and EDPY 310 and EDPY 472 and LLSS 443 and MSET 365. Corequisite: 401L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ed. in Elementary Education.

412L. K-8 Field Experience II (2)

This course is designed for planning and teaching in K-8 Schools for Elementary Education majors in their second semester of Field Experience. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.  Prerequisite: 401 and 411L.  Corequisite: 402L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ed. in Elementary Education.

413L. K-8 Field Experience III-Student Teaching (6)

This course is designed for planning and teaching in K-8 Schools for Elementary Education majors in their third and final semester of Field Experience. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.  Prerequisite: 402L and 412L.  Corequisite: 403L. Restriction: admitted to B.S.Ed. in Elementary Education.

*421. The Social Studies Program in the Elementary School (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Overview and development of the social studies curriculum within the contexts of the elementary school program and multicultural community settings.

*433. Oral and Written Language Program in the Elementary School (2-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

The development extension/elaboration and analysis of the language arts in both home language and English language. Creative methods and materials.

*438. Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Field (3)

Course explores issues of literacy development (i.e. reading, writing, listening and speaking) across core content areas of school curriculum. Required in secondary teacher education for all content specialization areas. Restriction: permission of department.

450 / 550. Issues in Secondary Education (3)

An exploration of issues that face secondary school teachers, including classroom management, school and community, learning needs of adolescent learners, and planning for diverse groups. Restriction: permission of instructor.

*453. The Science Program in the Elementary School (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



*461. The Mathematics Program in the Elementary School (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



462. Student Teaching (3-6-9-12 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

Observation and teaching in secondary schools for one or more semesters. Weekly seminar meetings required with University supervisors. Prerequisite: 362.

464. Student Teaching Seminar (3)

A seminar linked to student teaching to address issues of teaching as a profession. Corequisite: 462.

492. Workshop (1-4 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

(Also offered as MSET 492)

493 / 593. Topics in Education (1-6, no limit Δ)

Undergraduate and or graduate credit for students in Teacher Education working with faculty in specific topics identified by the course title.

497. Reading and Research in Honors (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: permission of major advisor.

500. Research Applications to Education (3)

An exploration of the forms of research in teaching and learning. Students have opportunities to identify types of research and determine the significance of the conclusions of research.

501. High School Curriculum (3)

Inquiry into high school curriculum with a focus on organization, models, goals setting, planning and evaluation.

502. Advanced Instructional Strategies (3)

Exploration of accomplished teaching through study, practice and inquiry. Subject matter pedagogy and the diversity of pathways for learning, assessment and special needs in instruction are addressed.

505. Experiential, Project-Based and Service Learning (3)

Explores experiential, project-based, and service learning for effective inquiry teaching. Students design lessons that engage learners in real-world activities. Students learn about research that supports the use of these methods.

511. Curriculum in the Elementary School (3)

A study in the design, structure, and implementation of curriculum in elementary classrooms. Other topics include historical perspectives of curriculum, influential factors on defining curriculum, and theoretical connections.

513. The Process of Reflection and Inquiry (3)

Engages experienced teachers in the study and analysis of their own teaching and learning events through reflection and inquiry. Case studies, journals and narratives of teachers are used as tools for developing understandings.

516. Integrating Curriculum and Inquiry in the Classroom (1-4 to a maximum of 8 Δ)

Inquiry and practice in integrating curriculum across disciplines of knowledge, children’s diverse understandings, habits of mind and community needs and projects. Explores organization, models, goals setting, planning and evaluation.

520. Effective Teaching and Student Learning (3)

Concepts of effective teaching and student learning are defined and compared to current trends in measuring teacher effectiveness and student achievement. Throughout the course, individuals examine their own teaching practices and their students' learning.

531. The Reading Program in the Elementary School (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Prerequisite: 330L.

542. Principles of Curriculum Development (3)

Focuses on issues of curriculum (K–12) from formal aspects of goals setting and planning to implicit issues of politics, culture and ideology.

550 / 450. Issues in Secondary Education (3)

An exploration of issues that face secondary school teachers, including classroom management, school and community, learning needs of adolescent learners, and planning for diverse groups. Restriction: permission of instructor.

552. Social Justice in Education (3)

Exploration of complex social justice issues and pedagogical responses. Focuses on knowledge and skills teachers need to integrate principles of social justice fully into classroom curriculum and instruction.

553. Engaging Youth Literacy through Latin American Testimonio (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Presupposing interconnectedness between literacy and social justice, this course engages high school youth to design curriculum around diverse literacies through Testimonios unfolding within Latin American and Chicana/o literature, music, poetry, and visual and performative art.

563. Mentoring Educators for Professional Growth (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

This course is designed for active mentor teachers. Participants are reflective practitioners sharing experiences, issues, and suggestions with other mentor teachers.

568. The Art of Masterful Teaching (3)

Exploration of multiple perspectives on characteristics of master teachers and the qualities of highly effective teaching. Restriction: permission of department.

571. Multimedia for Literacy for Educators (3)

(Also offered as MSET 571) Prepares teachers and teacher educators to use the digital tools needed to create, deconstruct, share, and leverage multimodal forms of communication for teaching and learning.  The class is an introduction to Media Literacy Education (MLE).

581. Initial Field Experience K-8 Seminar (1)

This course is the discussion and analysis seminar for M.A. with Alternative Route to K-8 Licensure students during their first semester of Field Experience. Corequisite: 594. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Elementary Education.

582. K-8 Field Experience Seminar II (1)

This course is the discussion and analysis seminar for M.A. with Alternative Route to K-8 Licensure students during their second and final semester of Field Experience. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Elementary Education.

590. Seminar (3)

For students in the Department of Teacher Education, this course synthesizes course work which has made up a master's degree program. Enhance and develop competence in professional communication, written and oral.

591 / 391. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

A problems course, EDUC 591, is an acceptable substitute for EDUC 502 for all students in a teaching field endorsement program.

592. Workshop (1-4 to a maximum of 5 Δ)



593 / 493. Topics in Education (1-3, no limit Δ)



594. Initial Field Experience (1)

This course is designed for planning and teaching in elementary schools for M.A. with Alternative Route to K-8 Licensure students during their first semester of Field Experience. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Corequisite: 581. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Elementary Education

595. Advanced Field Experiences (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

(Also offered as MSET 595) Planned and supervised advanced professional laboratory or field experiences in agency or institutional settings.

596. Internship (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

(Also offered as MSET 596)

597. Directed Readings in Secondary and Adult Teacher Education (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



598. Directed Reading in Elementary Education (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as MSET 599) Offered on a CR/NC basis only

602. Teacher Education Pedagogy (3)

This doctoral course examines theory, research, policy frameworks and best practices for instruction appropriate for each stage of teacher development within the field of teacher education.

643. Curriculum Theory Seminar (3)

Doctoral level seminar examining curriculum theory. Restriction: permission of instructor.

652. Teacher Education and Social Justice (3)

Doctoral investigation of social justice specifically related to three aspects of teacher education: teaching for social justice; higher education, hegemony, models of education; and teacher education for social justice.

690. Dissertation Seminar (3)



691. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: admitted to Ed.D or Ph.D. Teaching, Learning, and Teacher Education.

693. Topics in Teacher Education (1-3, no limit Δ)



696. Internship (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

(Also offered as MSET 696)

698. Directed Readings in Elementary/Secondary Teacher Education (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as MSET 699) Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Educational Media/Library Science (EMLS)


391. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 20 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.




Emergency Medicine (EMS)


106. Emergency Medical Responder (4)

Emergency Medical Responder is a 60-hours course designed specifically for personnel who are first at the scene of an accident or emergency. This course offers a foundation for advanced EMS courses.

112. Wilderness First Responder (4)

This course is intended for individuals who participate in outdoor recreation or are wilderness professionals such as guides or Search and Rescue personnel.

113. EMT-Basic (8)

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lecture instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing. Corequisite: 142.

120. Introduction to EMS System (3)

Covers the history of emergency medical services and the development of EMS systems and current trends and issues in EMS. Ideal for students considering a career in EMS.

125. Wilderness EMT Upgrade (2)

This Wilderness EMT Upgrade course is intended for EMS providers who participate in outdoor recreation or are wilderness professionals such as guides or Search and Rescue personnel. Students must have completed or be currently enrolled in an EMT course. Pre- or corequisite: 113 and 142.

142. EMT-Basic Lab (2)

Meets the 1998 EMT-Basic National Standard Curriculum requirements and incorporates New Mexico EMT-B scope of practice. Provides lab instruction to prepare the student to sit for New Mexico and National Registry testing. Corequisite: 113.

143. EMT-Intermediate Lab (1)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate skills training, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Corequisite: 180. Restriction: program permission.

151. EMT-I Clinical and Field Experience (2)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate field and clinical training, including emergency department and prehospital experience. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Corequisite: 143 and 180. Restriction: program permission.

180. EMT-Intermediate (5)

Meets New Mexico requirements for EMT-Intermediate lecture content, including intravenous fluid administration and pharmacology. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Corequisite: 143. Restriction: program permission.

193. Emergency Medicine Topics (1-3, no limit Δ)

Titles will vary.

223. Principles of EMT Lab Instruction (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course is designed to teach students how to instruct EMT-Basic students in the lab setting through application of professional knowledge of skills and theory pertaining to the EMT-Basic curriculum. Prerequisite: 113 and 142. Restriction: preadmitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and permission of department.

309. Prehospital Emergency Medicine and Operations (3)

This course will introduce the paramedic student to EMS systems, requirements and methods of communications with patients, various rules and regulations unique to the paramedic, and investigate the components of maintaining wellness as a paramedic. Corequisite: 310 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

310. Prehospital Pharmacology (3)

Provides the paramedic student with an overview of drug classes, actions, and metabolism, as well as an understanding of considerations in medication administration. Corequisite: 309 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

311. Medical Assessment and Management (3)

This course is designed to introduce the paramedic student to advanced medical management and patient assessment in the prehospital environment. The student will assess and manage the Cardiovascular and Pulmonary human systems. Corequisite: 309 and 310 and 312 and 341 and 351. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

312. Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Emergencies (3)

Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Emergencies course provides students with an overview of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, as well as cardiac rhythm interpretation and introduction to 12-lead ECGs. Corequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 341 and 351. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

320. Medical Emergencies (3)

Medical Emergencies course provides students with an overview of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology, of the medical patient. Prerequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351.  Corequisite: 321 and 331 and 342 and 352 and 400.  Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

321. Special Patient Populations (2)

Provides an introduction to the prehospital assessment and management of patients with special considerations, as well as, operations in the prehospital environment. Prerequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351. Corequisite: 320 and 331 and 342 and 352 and 400.  Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

331. Trauma Emergencies (2)

Introduces the paramedic student to prehospital advanced life support assessment and management of patients with traumatic injury. Prerequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351. Corequisite: 320 and 321 and 342 and 352 and 400.  Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

341. Paramedic Lab I (2)

Provides instruction in and practice application of advanced life support skills in patient assessment, airway management, medication administration, and advanced cardiac life support. Corequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 351. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

342. Paramedic Lab II (2)

Provides instruction in and practice application of advanced life support skills in the assessment and management of patients with medical emergencies. Practice in vehicle extrication skills. Prerequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351. Corequisite: 320 and 321 and 331 and 352 and 400. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

351. Paramedic Clinical Rotation I (3)

Facilitates paramedic students’ progress toward entry-level clinical competence by providing the opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge and skills with professional practice under the supervision of clinical instructors. Corequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 341. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

352. Paramedic Clinical Rotation II (4)

Observation and supervised care of emergency patients in the emergency department, inpatient units, and prehospital setting. Prerequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351. Corequisite: 320 and 321 and 331 and 342 and 400. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

398. EMS Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 15 Δ)



399. EMS Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



400. Advanced Assessment (3)

Provides paramedics with an in-depth understanding of patient history and physical examination techniques. Prerequisite: 309 and 310 and 311 and 312 and 341 and 351.  Corequisite: 320 and 321 and 331 and 342 and 352. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

403. Mountain Medicine (3)

The Mountain Medicine course is intended for medical professionals who participate in mountain recreation or are mountain professionals such as guides or Mountain Rescue personnel with a current EMT-Intermediate, Paramedic or Nurse license. Prerequisite: 454. Corequisite: 405 and 406. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

404. Technical Rescue Course (3)

To understand theory and application of rope rescue. Gain a working knowledge of rope rescue and access problems in mountainous terrain and how to safely navigate it. Prerequisite: 403 and 405 and 406. Corequisite: 408. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

405. Austere Medicine (3)

Students will learn management of medical and trauma cases under austere conditions: Low resources, little or no back-up, prolonged contact/responsibility for the patient. We will consider present recommendations and student will evaluate those recommendations. Prerequisite: 454. Corequisite: 403 and 406. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

406. Mountain Medicine Lab I (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course will be arranged curriculum to satisfy the field practice Summer requirement for DiMM/CiMM. Including skill/scenario stations in a mountain setting, practical evaluation in medicine and technical rescue. Prerequisite: 454. Corequisite: 403 and 405. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

408. Mountain Medicine Lab II (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course will be arranged curriculum to satisfy the field practice Winter requirement for DiMM/CiMM. Including skill/scenario stations in a mountain setting, practical evaluation in medicine and technical rescue. Prerequisite: 403 and 405 and 406. Corequisite: 404. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

411. EMS Systems Management and Public Policy (3)

An introduction to all of the components of EMS systems from the local, regional, state, and national system levels; system design; and the interface with health care in the U.S. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and permission of program.

412. EMS Service Operations (3)

An overview of EMS management functions when operating an EMS service, including staffing, deployment, logistics, quality improvement, and planning. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and permission of program.

413. EMS Management Internship (3)

The internship provides a real-life EMS management project or function operating within an EMS system or Emergency Services environment. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and permission of program.

421. EMS Education Internship (3)

The student is assigned to an instructor mentor and will participate, under supervision, in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of EMS training programs. Prerequisite: 454. Corequisite: 441. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

423. Principles of Paramedic Lab Instruction (3)

Prepares EMS students to instruct paramedic level students with medical education simulation, assessment and debriefing techniques. Additionally, it provides initial training at the paramedic education level emphasizing practical application of EMS skills and instruction. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and permission of department.

424. Advanced Principles of Paramedic Lab Instruction (3)

Prepares advanced EMS students to develop and run complex simulation cases and instruct paramedic level students with high fidelity medical simulation. Also provides comprehensive training relatable to all EMS education levels. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and permission of department.

441. Principles of EMS Education (3)

This course covers the development, design, implementation, and evaluation of EMS training programs. Prerequisite: 454. Corequisite: 421. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

443. Educational Technology and Medical Simulation (3)

This course will introduce the EMS educator student to technologies utilized for educational purposes both in the classroom and online. It will also introduce approaches to utilizing medical simulation to enhance learning. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and permission of program.

454. Paramedic Field Internship (4)

Paramedic students develop EMS team-leadership skills and learn to operate independently, under supervision, at entry-level competence. Prerequisite: 320 and 321 and 331 and 342 and 352 and 400.  Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

455. Disaster and Emergency Management (3)

Introduces students to the dynamic world of disaster, and emergency management. Through the review of the history, social, political, and economic implications of disasters, students explore the world of emergency management. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

456. Social Dimension of Disaster (3)

Introduces students to the dynamic world of disasters and the effects disasters have on human behavior. An overview of how individuals, groups, families, communities, and organizations handle disasters before, during, and after they occur. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

458. International Disasters (3)

Explores the complex world of disasters in the international arena, including as they relate to EMS providers. Students learn theoretical underpinnings of international relations and disaster theory while exploring historical case studies and analyzing impacts. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

461. Advanced Pathophysiology (3)

System-focused content addresses the normal physiologic and pathologic mechanisms of disease that serve as the foundation for advanced clinical assessment, decision-making, and management. Prerequisite: 454. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

465. Advanced Paramedic Clerkship (1-6, may be repeated once Δ)

Students will assess undifferentiated patients, coming up with your own diagnostic and therapeutic management plan, integrating and applying risk stratification, triage and differential diagnosis. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: 400 and 461.

469. Epidemiology and Statistics (3)

To introduce and review basic tools of biostatistics, epidemiology, and research design; to teach students to critically evaluate relationships that seem to be cause-effect. Prerequisite: 454 and MATH 1350. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

470. EMS Research Analysis (3)

This course provides the student with an overview of the research process and teaches skills in critical analysis of medical literature. Prerequisite: 454 and MATH 1350. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Emergency Medical Services and program permission.

475. Research in Acute Care (3)

An introduction to clinical research in the UNM Emergency Department. This course will provide students with tools and training to work independently on screening and enrolling subjects in research studies currently conducted in the ED. Restriction: permission of instructor.

481. Community Paramedic: Public Health and Wellness (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course will introduce the student to public health and will learn to apply principles of public health in your work and recognize opportunities to positively impact community health. Restriction: permission of instructor.

498. EMS Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 15 Δ)



499. EMS Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)






General Courses for Engineering Majors (ENG)


120. Mathematics for Engineering Applications (4)

Provides an overview of basic engineering math topics necessary for success in second-year engineering courses. Topics are presented in the context of engineering applications, and reinforced through labs and examples from core engineering courses. Prerequisite: MATH 1220.

195. Special Topics (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Selected topics in interdisciplinary engineering or computer science at an introductory level.

200. Technology in Society (3)

This is an introduction to the ways in which technology shapes the world–and is itself shaped by society, culture, politics, economics and history. Topics include industrialization, technological changes, cultural impact, environmental policies and social and ethical responsibilities. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

220. Engineering, Business, and Society (3)

Using a team-teaching format to foster students' understanding of the interaction of engineering practice with business and society. Students will learn about innovation, entrepreneurship, global engineering standards, professional ethics, business and technical writing.

301. Fundamentals of Engineering: Dynamics (1)

Builds on the basics of kinematics and kinetics of particles learned in physics to study the fundamentals of planar dynamics of rigid bodies. Students learn to analyze planar kinematics and kinetics of a rigid body. Prerequisite: MATH 2530. Restriction: sophomore standing and above. Not allowed for students majoring in Mechanical Engineering.

302. Fundamentals of Engineering: Electronic Circuits (1)

Builds on the basics of electrical circuit analysis learned in physics to study the fundamentals of electronic circuits. Students learn to design simple circuits using op-amps and transistors. Prerequisite: PHYS 1320. Restriction: admitted to School of Engineering and sophomore standing or above. Not allowed for Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering majors.

303. Fundamentals of Engineering: Thermodynamics (1)

Covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics with engineering applications, suitable for students who intend to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. Prerequisite: MATH 2530. Restriction: sophomore standing and above in School of Engineering. Not allowed for Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, or Nuclear Engineering majors.

495. Special Topics (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Selected topics in interdisciplinary engineering or computer science at a senior level.




English (ENGL)


1110 [110]. Composition I [Accelerated Composition] (3)

Covers Composition I: Stretch I and II in one semester, focusing on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW) Credit for both this course and ENGL 1110X may not be applied toward a degree program. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications. Prerequisite: ACT English =16-25 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =450-659 or Next Generation ACCUPLACER Writing =>279.

1110X–1110Y [111–112]. Composition I: Stretch I and II (3; 3)

First and second semester of Composition I stretch sequence. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW) These are the first and second courses in a two-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for ENGL 1110, all courses in this sequence (ENGL 1110X, ENGL 1110Y) must be taken and passed. Credit for both ENGL 1110X and ENGL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program. Students with ACT English <15 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing <430 or ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills <109 will begin their English Composition Sequence with ENGL 1110X.  Prerequisite for 1110Y: 1110X. Restriction for 1110X: permission of department. Restriction for 1110Y: permission of instructor.

1110Z [113]. Enhanced Composition (4)

Covers Composition I Stretch I and II in one semester with a 1 credit hour lab. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW) Credit not allowed for both (1110Z and 1110) or (1110Z and 1110Y).   Prerequisite: ACT English =15-18 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =430-490 or ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills =93-108. Restriction: permission of department. {Not offered on Main Campus}

1120 [120]. Composition II [Composition III] (3)

Focuses on academic writing, research, and argumentation using appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications. Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690.

1410 [150]. Introduction to Literature [The Study of Literature] (3)

In this course, students will examine a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will identify common literary elements in each genre, understanding how specific elements influence meaning. (LL) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

1710 [107]. Greek Mythology (3)

Introduction to mythology; primary readings in stories about the gods and heroes, usually including Homer, Hesiod, Homeric Hymns and Tragedies. All texts will be in English. (LL)

206. Topics in Popular Literature (3, no limit Δ)

Reading and analysis of popular literary forms such as the spy novel, the detective novel, science fiction, best-sellers and fantasy.

2110 [240]. Traditional Grammar (3)

This course surveys traditional grammar, introducing linguistic terminology and methods for identifying and understanding parts of speech, parts of sentences and basic sentence patterns. The course presents terminology and methods designed to increase the student’s understanding of the structure of the language. (LL)

2120 [220]. Intermediate Composition [Expository Writing] (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course builds upon and refines the writing skills acquired in previous writing courses, with a focus on non-fiction prose. Research, composition, exposition and presentation abilities will be practiced and developed. Through analysis and revision, students will develop strategies to improve the versatility and impact of their writing. Course topics and emphases may vary by section. (EPW) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications. Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2210 [219]. Professional and Technical Communication [Technical and Professional Writing] (3)

Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. (EPW) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications. Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2220 [290]. Introduction to Professional Writing (3)

Introductory course in the professional writing concentration. Study of technical writing, public information and public relations writing and freelance nonfiction writing. (EPW) Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2240 [249]. Introduction to Studies in English (1)

Introduces English major, providing historical background, introduction to rhetoric and professional writing, creative writing, and literary studies. Introduces library resources used in field. Preparation for writing declaration of major statement. Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z.

2310 [224]. Introduction to Creative Writing (3)

This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this "workshop" course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and non-fiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres. (CW) Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z.

2510 [250]. Analysis of Literature [Literary Textual Analysis] (3)

This course is an introduction to literary analysis and writing applied to literary techniques, conventions, and themes. Students will learn how to write focused literary analyses, demonstrating their understanding of biographical, critical, cultural, and historical contexts of various writers and genres. Students will also learn proper documentation, as well as other skills, such as quoting, paraphrasing, and integrating sources, both primary and secondary. First course required of all English majors. Concentrates on methods of literary analysis and critical writing. (LL) Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

2540 [265]. Introduction to Chicana/o Literature (3)

This course examines a variety of literary genres to explore the historical development of Chicano/a social and literary identities. This survey offers an overview of the history of Chicano/a literature, introducing the major trends and placing them into an historical framework.  (LL)

2560 [264]. Introduction to Native American Literature (3)

This course will introduce students to the literature produced by Native American authors as well as explore issues relevant to the study of Native American literature. The course will also introduce the basic elements of literary analysis. (LL) 

2610 [296]. American Literature I [Earlier American Literature] (3)

This course surveys American literature from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand the origins of American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to early American culture. (LL) 

2620 [297]. American Literature II [Later American Literature] (3)

This course surveys American literature from the mid-nineteenth-century to the contemporary period. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to American culture. (LL) 

2630 [294]. British Literature I [Earlier English Literature] (3)

This course offers a study of British literature from its origins in Old English to the 18th century. This survey covers specific literary works—essays, short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. (LL)

2640 [295]. British Literature II [Later English Literature] (3)

This course offers a study of British literature from the 18th century to the present. This survey covers specific literary works—short stories, novels, poems, and plays—as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. (LL)

2650 [292]. World Literature I [World Literatures: Ancient World through the 16th Century] (3)

In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literature. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. (LL) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

2660 [293]. World Literature II [World Literatures: 17th Century through the Present] (3)

In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from the 1600s to the present. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. (LL) Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

2670 [266]. African American Literature [African-American Literature I] (3)

The course introduces students to the African American classics of the slavery era. Daily experiences of the characters in these books become the basis for discussing race, class, gender, revolt, freedom, peace and humanity. (LL)

2993 [298]. Workshop in English [Workshop in Literature or Writing] (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Various topics in literature, language and writing. (EPW)

2996 [211] [248] [287]. Topics [Topics in Literature] [Topics in Popular Medieval Literature and Studies] [Topics in Introductory Studies in Genre] (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



304. The Bible as Literature (3)

Literary aspects of the Old and New Testaments. Examines the literary forms within the Bible: epic, parable, pastoral, allegory, proverb and so on. Stresses the importance of the Bible as a source for English and American literature. (LL)

305. Mythology (3)

An introduction to the major traditions of European and American mythology. Basic themes and motifs: the quest, creation, birth, marriage, heroes, heroines and death. Provides background for the study of later literature. (LL)

306. Arthurian Legend and Romance (3)

(Also offered as COMP 306) Comprehensive study of the Arthurian Legend from its Celtic origins, to its medieval French romance continuators, and its English apex in Malory. May also trace post-medieval versions in art, print, and film. (LL)

308. The Jewish Experience in American Literature and Culture (3)

A comprehensive survey of the cultural and historic relationship between Jews and American culture and character as a whole. (LL)

315. Interdisciplinary Literary Studies (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Combines the study of literature with the study of outside materials from history, sociology or other disciplines. Examples include Religion and Literature, Law and Literature, Literature of the Depression and Medieval Literature and Culture. (LL)

320. Advanced Expository Writing (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Advanced study of specific academic, technical and professional genres. Topic varies. (EPW) Prerequisite: 2120 or 2210 or 2220.

321. Intermediate Creative Writing-Fiction (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An intermediate course in fiction, building on basic concepts introduced in 2310. Emphasizes writing as a reader and incorporates the workshop critique of student drafts. A $20.00 workshop fee is required. (CW) Prerequisite: 2310.

322. Intermediate Creative Writing-Poetry (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An intermediate course in poetry, building on basic concepts introduced in 2310. Emphasizes writing as a reader and incorporates the workshop critiques of student drafts. A $20.00 workshop fee is required. (CW) Prerequisite: 2310.

323. Intermediate Creative Writing-Creative Nonfiction (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An intermediate course in creative nonfiction, building on basic concepts introduced in 2310. Emphasizes writing as a reader and incorporates the workshop critique of student drafts. A $20.00 workshop fee is required. (CW) Prerequisite: 2310.

324. Introduction to Screenwriting (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as FDMA 324) Writing workshop on basics of character structure, scenes, visualization and good old story telling as it applies to the screenplay. Students read scripts, watch film clips and begin writing an original screenplay. (CW) Restriction: permission of instructor.

330. Topics in Comparative and World Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP 330) Study of special topics in Comparative and World Literatures, including studies of genre, period, literary movements and themes. (LL)

331. Topics in Asian Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP 331) Study of the culture and literatures of India, China, Japan and other Asian traditions. Topics vary. (LL)

332. Topics in African Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP 332) Study of the culture and literatures of Africa. Topics vary. (LL)

*333. Topics in Latin Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as COMP *333) Study of individual authors, genres or periods of Latin literature and culture in translation. (LL)

*334. Topics in Greek Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as COMP *334) Study of individual authors, genres and periods of Greek literature and culture in translation. (LL)

335. Topics in French Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, FREN 335) Study of individual authors, genres and/or periods of French and Francophone literature and culture. (LL)

336. Topics in German Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, GRMN 336) Study of individual authors, genres, and/or periods of German literature and culture in translation. May only be taken twice for the German major and once for the German minor. (LL)

337. Topics in Italian Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, ITAL 337) Study of individual authors, genres, and/or periods of Italian literature and culture in translation. (LL)

338. Topics in Russian Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, RUSS 338) Study of individual authors, genres, and/or periods of Russian literature and culture in translation. (LL)

339. Topics in Japanese Literature and Culture in Translation (3, no limit Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, JAPN 339) Study of individual authors, genres and/or periods of Japanese literature and culture in translation. (LL)

341. Introduction to Premodern Japanese Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

(Also offered as COMP, JAPN 341) An introduction to Japanese literature and culture from the 8th to the 19th century, this course focuses on major literary works and performance genres in their historical context.

342. Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture in Translation (3)

(Also offered as COMP, JAPN 342) This course is an introductory exploration of the literature and culture of modern Japan, from the mid-19th century to the present day. Students will critically read a selection of modern prose narratives and poetry.

343. Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

(Also offered as CHIN, COMP 343) This course surveys Chinese literature and culture from the origins of Chinese civilization to the present, with a focus on the continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern China.

345. The Supernatural in Japanese Fiction, Folklore and Drama (3)

(Also offered as COMP, JAPN 345) Survey of Japanese mythology, folklore, drama and fiction from 1000 CE to the present with a focus on the cultural significance of ghosts, monsters, spirit possession and otherworldly encounters.

347. Viking Mythology (3)

(Also offered as MDVL 347)  Comprehensive study of the mythology and literature of medieval Scandinavia, including the poetry of Snorri Sturluson, the prose and poetic Edda, and the Icelandic sagas.

348. Topics in Medieval Studies (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Approaches to reading and analysis of selected major works in medieval literature, history, art and architecture, and philosophy. (LL) 

349. From Beowulf to Arthur (3)

Survey of the principal literary genres and approaches to Old and Middle English literature in translation. (LL)

350. Medieval Tales of Wonder (3)

Study of medieval literature, language, and culture in the context of insular and continental texts. (LL)

351. Chaucer (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Comprehensive study of Chaucer’s poetry, focusing upon language, versification and literary sources in their historical and cultural contexts. Alternates between focus upon Canterbury Tales and upon Troilus and Criseyde with selected other works. (LL)

352. Early Shakespeare (3)

Survey of Shakespeare’s Elizabethan-era drama and poetry, including such works as A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Henry IV, Hamlet and Venus and Adonis. Examines dramatic structure, characterization, poetics and a variety of themes in their historical context. (LL)

353. Later Shakespeare (3)

Survey of Shakespeare’s Jacobean-era drama and poetry, including such works as Measure for Measure, Macbeth, The Tempest and the sonnets. Examines dramatic structure, characterization, poetics and a variety of themes in their historical context. (LL)

354. Milton (3)

Comprehensive study of Milton’s poetry and prose with the context of 17th-century history and of Milton criticism. Alternates between focus upon Paradise Lost and shorter poems, and upon Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes and prose. (LL)

355. Enlightenment Literature (3)

Literature and culture of the English Enlightenment (1650-1800), the construction of the modern world: the new science, exploration, empire. Experiments in theatre, satire, fiction: Dryden, Behn, Pope, Defoe, Swift, Fielding, Lennox, Austen. (LL)

356. Nineteenth Century British and Irish Literature (3)

A survey of 19th Century literature and culture, primarily focused on British and Irish literature, covering a wide range of authors and a variety of genres from the Romantic through the Victorian periods. (LL)

363. Nineteenth Century America (3)

Studies of the literature, culture, and social movements of the long nineteenth century. Focus may be early or late. Examples include Nineteenth Century American Literature and the West and Sexuality in the Nineteenth Century.

364. Topics in Native American Literature and Culture (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An examination of specialized topics in Native American literature and culture, organized by genre, period, theme, movement, or tribal nation. Examples include Native American Women Writers and Native American Genre Fiction. (LL)

365. Chicana/o Cultural Studies (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An examination of contemporary Chicana/o literature, criticism, murals, film, and other forms of popular culture, with an emphasis on the construction and representation of Chicana/o cultural identity. (LL)

366. African-American Literature II (3)

(Also offered as AFST 381) This is the second phase of a three-part journey through the African-American experience in search of humanity and peace. The vehicle is post-slavery books written by and about African-American people. Issues raised and the characters in the books provide the occasion for in-depth discussion of inhumanity, protests, self definition, race relationships, liberalism, etc. (LL)

368. Studies in American Literature (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Studies in American literature and culture, organized around genre, period, theme, or movement. Examples include American Science Fictions and The Culture of the Cold War.

374. Southwest Literature and Culture (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

An examination of major texts in Native, Hispanic, and Anglo literatures and cultures of the southwestern US, emphasizing the twentieth century and a variety of genres.

378. Individual Authors (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Study of one or more authors. Titles of individual sections vary as content varies. (LL)

387. Studies in Genre Criticism (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Study of the formal criticism associated with any genre of literature, including narrative, poetry, fiction, drama, and others. (LL)

388. Topics in Film and Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Examination of formal, thematic, and/or historical relationships between literary and cinematic forms including study of adaptations and/or interrelations between film and literature as a means of cultural expressions. (LL)

397. Regional Literature (3)

The study of a limited body of writers whose work is identified with a particular geographical region. Authors covered will differ but representative examples are Frank Waters, Willa Cather, Rudolfo Anaya and Walter Van Tilburg Clark. (LL)

410 / 510. Criticism and Theory (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

A historical survey of literary criticism and theory; alternates between criticism from the classical period through the early 19th century, and criticism and theory from the late 19th century through the present. (LL)

411 / 511. Special Topics: Criticism and Theory, Literary and Cultural Movements (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Advanced study of various topics in literary and cultural studies, literary criticism and theory. Recent topics have included Linguistics and Literary Criticism, Cultural Theory, Literature and National Identity. (LL)

412. Capstone and Honors Seminar (3)

Seminar bringing together literary, rhetorical, and/or theoretical works from different times or cultural moments. Students do in-depth research with a clear theoretical base and give oral presentations of their work. (LL)

413 / 513. Scientific, Environmental and Medical Writing (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Theoretical and practical studies of writing in the sciences. Addresses writing for both popular and professional audiences. (EPW)

414 / 514. Documentation (3)

Theory and practice in developing, editing and producing technical documentation for paper-based and online media. (EPW)

415 / 515. Publishing (3)

Theory and process of publishing, offering successful strategies for working with and within the publishing industry. Course includes the discussion of the cultural function of publishing. (EPW)

416 / 516. Biography and Autobiography (3)

Writing and reading biography and autobiography; researching a life to be rendered in writing. (EPW)

417 / 517. Editing (3)

Theory and practice of copyediting print and on-line documents. Rhetorical, linguistic and historical analyses of style, grammar and usage. (EPW)

418 / 518. Proposal and Grant Writing (3)

Invention and delivery of proposals and grants in the business, scientific, technical and artistic arenas. (EPW)

419 / 519. Visual Rhetoric (3)

Analysis and design of paper-based and on-line documents. (EPW)

420 / 520. Topics in Professional Writing (3, no limit Δ)

Advanced study of professional writing theory and practice. Recent topics have included creative non-fiction, hypertext and advanced technical writing. (EPW)

421 / 521. Advanced Creative Writing-Fiction (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An advanced course in fiction with a strong emphasis on revision. Combines the workshop experience with classroom study of published authors as well as some theorists on writing. A $20.00 workshop fee is required. (CW) Prerequisite: 321.

422 / 522. Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An advanced course in poetry with a strong emphasis on revision. Combines the workshop experience with classroom study of published poets as well as some theorists on writing. A $20.00 workshop fee is required. (CW) Prerequisite: 322.

423 / 523. Advanced Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An advanced course in creative nonfiction with a strong emphasis on revision. Combines the workshop experience with classroom study of published authors as well as some theorists on writing. A $20.00 workshop fee is required. (CW) Prerequisite: 323.

424. Creative Writing Workshop Script (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Advanced workshop devoted to student preparation of working scripts for film or television. (CW) Restriction: permission of instructor.

432. Topics in Literature and Culture (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, FREN 432) Varying topics in the practice and theory of literatures and cultures. (LL)

440 / 540. Topics in Language or Rhetoric (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

An overview of a defined theme or issue in language or rhetorical theory. Recent topics have included Discourse Analysis/Text Linguistics, Survey of American English, Narrative Theory and Literature, Epistemic Rhetoric and Language Studies, such as Old Norse. (LL)

441 / 541. English Grammars (3)

A survey of various grammar models and their applications to analysis of the English language. (LL) Prerequisite: 2110.

442 / 542. Major Texts in Rhetoric (3)

A survey of rhetorical and language theories from the classical period through the 18th century. (LL)

444. Practicum: Tutoring Writing (3)

Concentrates on the theory and practice of tutoring student writing. Prerequisite: 1120. Restriction: permission of instructor.

445 / 545. History of the English Language (3)

A historical survey of the etymology, morphology, phonetics and semantics of English, as well as the relation between the English language and cultural change. (LL)

447 / 547. Introductory Old English (3)

(Also offered as LING 447 / 547) An introduction to the grammar, syntax, and phonology of Old English. Prepares students for more advanced studies in this and later periods. (LL)

448 / 548. Topics in Advanced Old English (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Intensive advanced study of Old English literature alternating between Beowulf and other major works of Old English poetry and prose. (LL) Prerequisite: 447 / 547.

449 / 549. Middle English Language (3)

(Also offered as LING 449) Comprehensive study of Middle English dialects and the development of Middle English from Old English. Prepares students for Middle English literature. (LL)

450 / 550. Middle English Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Middle English literature in the original, excluding Chaucer; alternates with Medieval Lyrics, Medieval Romance, Saints Lives. (LL)

451 / 551. Topics in Medieval Studies (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Advanced study of specialized aspects in medieval studies, such as manuscripts; paleography; research methods; Old Norse studies; medieval Latin sources; cultural, feminist, and historical theoretical approaches to literature; medievalism in Britain and America; history of scholarship. (LL)

452 / 552. The Renaissance (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of prose, poetry and/or drama of the 16th century. Emphasis varies. (LL)

453 / 553. The Seventeenth Century (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of prose, poetry and/or drama of the 17th century. Emphasis varies. (LL)

454 / 554. Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in literature and culture on topics such as Restoration comedy and heroic tragedy, early eighteenth-century satire and major authors such as John Dryden, Aphra Behn, Alexander Pope, Daniel Defoe and Jonathan Swift.

455 / 555. Middle and Late Eighteenth Century (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in literature and culture 1735–1800 on topics such as eighteenth-century theater, the development of fiction, the construction of difference and the representations of the relationship between England and the rest of the world. (LL)

456 / 556. British Romanticism (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in the literature and culture of early 19th-century Britain; the Wordsworth circle, the Keats-Shelley circle, Romantic women writers and special topics such as British Culture in the 1790s and Romantic Theory. (LL)

457 / 557. Victorian Studies (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in the literature and culture of the Victorian era; recent offerings have included Dickens, the Bronte’s; and special topics such as Sensation’ Detection and the Detective Novel; Victorian Sexualities; and Race, Class and Gender. (LL)

458 / 558. Modern British Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the poetry, fiction, drama and nonfiction prose of early 20th-century Britain and Ireland, including the works of Conrad, Yeats, Eliot, Forster, Joyce, Shaw and Woolf. (LL)

459 / 559. Irish Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of the prose, poetry and drama of Ireland. Alternates between surveys of modern and postmodern Irish literature and special topics or single author courses such as on Yeats or Joyce. (LL)

460. Early American Literature (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

This course focuses on pre-1830 American literature. Literary and other texts explore the encounter between Europeans and indigenous peoples of the Americas; colonial and early Republic periods are also examined.

461 / 561. American Romanticism (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the prose and poetry of mid-19th-century America, including writings by the Transcendentalists, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Stowe, Whitman and Dickinson. (LL)

462 / 562. American Realism and Naturalism (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of the prose and poetry of turn-of-the-century America, including writings by Mark Twain, Henry James, Crane, Wharton, Norris and Gilman. (LL)

463. Modern American Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of the poetry, fiction, drama and non-fiction prose of American literature from 1900–1945, including works by writers such as Cather, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, O’Neill, Frost, H.D., Hughes and Stevens. (LL)

464 / 564. Advanced Studies in Native American and Indigenous Literature (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Advanced study of Native American and Indigenous literature, with attention to literary history, theory, and critical methodologies. Includes materials beyond American Indian or U.S. contexts, such as First Nations or global Indigenous. (LL) 

465 / 565. Chicana/o Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Advanced study of Chicana/o literature, literary history, criticism, theory, novels, short stories, poetry, and film, with emphasis on ethnic, regional, gender, and linguistic identity from nineteenth century to the present. (LL)

466. African-American Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An introduction to traditional and/or contemporary African-American texts. Topics have included Survey of the African-American Novel and Toni Morrison. (LL)

468 / 568. Topics in American Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intensive study of special topics in American Literature. Offerings have included Literature of the Civil War, 19th-Century American Literature and the Visual Arts, Southern American Literature and American Women Writers. (LL)

470 / 570. Modernist Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of the poetry, fiction, drama and non-fiction prose of the early 20th century in the United States, Britain and Ireland, with some consideration of the international influence of and upon these literatures. Course content varies from semester to semester. (LL)

472 / 572. Contemporary Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of the poetry, fiction, drama and non-fiction prose of the post-1945 era in the United States and Britain, with some consideration of the international influence of and upon these literatures. Course content varies from semester to semester. (LL)

473. Postmodernism (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Studies in experimental literary works and theories from World War II to the present. (LL)

474 / 574. Contemporary Southwestern Literature (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course presents and analyzes major texts in post-war literature of the southwestern U.S., emphasizing the cultural exchanges among Native, Hispanic and Anglo literature and culture. (LL)

478. Topics in Individual Authors (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Advanced study of one or more authors. Titles of individual sections vary as content varies. (LL)

479 / 579. Postcolonial Literatures (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Survey of Postcolonial literatures and theories emanating from the Indian subcontinent, Africa and other countries recently independent from the British Empire.

480 / 580. Topics in British Literature (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Intensive study of special issues and themes, literary movements and single authors in British Literature. (LL)

486 / 586. British Fiction (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Studies in the literary and cultural emergence and formation of fiction as a genre in English. Course content varies; recent topics include The Early English Novel; The 18th-Century Comic Novel; and Race, Class and Gender in the 19th-Century Novel. (LL)

487. Advanced Studies in Genre (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Study any one genre, including narrative, comedy, satire, tragedy, poetics or stylistic analysis of nonfiction. (LL)

488. American Literature, Film, and Culture (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Focus varies but includes study of American literature, cinema, and other forms of visual culture.

490. Senior Honors Thesis (3)

Open only to students admitted to honors in English. To be taken in the semester when the senior thesis is completed. (LL)

497. Individual Study (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Permission of the instructor is required before registering. The student should present a plan of study to the instructor. (LL)

499. Internship (1-3)

Permission of the Professional Writing Director is required before registering. (LL) Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

500. Introduction to the Professional Study of English (3)

This course prepares students for advanced graduate work in English. Topics include research methods and bibliography; literary criticism and theory; and the history of English as a profession.

501. Introduction to the Profession for Writers (3)

Introduction to graduate studies for professional and creative writers. A survey of writing for different occasions, the world of publishing, the means of getting published and the technology writers need to know.

510 / 410. Criticism and Theory (3)

A one-semester course that focuses on contemporary criticism and theory in the context of classical through 19th-century criticism and theory.

511 / 411. Special Topics: Criticism and Theory, Literary and Cultural Movements (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Advanced study of various topics in literary and cultural studies, literary criticism and theory. Recent topics have included Linguistics and Literary Criticism, Cultural Theory, Literature and National Identity.

513 / 413. Scientific, Environmental and Medical Writing (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Theoretical and practical studies of writing in the sciences. Addresses writing for both popular and professional audiences.

514 / 414. Documentation (3)

Theory and practice in developing, editing and producing technical documentation for paper-based and online media.

515 / 415. Publishing (3)

Theory and process of publishing, offering successful strategies for working with and within the publishing industry. Course includes the discussion of the cultural function of publishing.

516 / 416. Biography and Autobiography (3)

Writing and reading biography and autobiography; researching a life to be rendered in writing.

517 / 417. Editing (3)

Theory and practice of copyediting print and on-line documents. Rhetorical, linguistic and historical analyses of style, grammar and usage.

518 / 418. Proposal and Grant Writing (3)

Invention and delivery of proposals and grants in the business, scientific, technical and artistic arenas.

519 / 419. Visual Rhetoric (3)

Analysis and design of paper-based and on-line documents.

520 / 420. Topics in Professional Writing (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Advanced study of professional writing theory and practice. Recent topics have included creative non-fiction, hypertext and advanced technical writing.

521 / 421. Creative Writing Workshop: Prose Fiction (3, no limit Δ)

Prerequisite: 421.

522 / 422. Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry (3, no limit Δ)

Prerequisite: 422.

523 / 423. Creative Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction (3, no limit Δ)

Prerequisite: 423.

530. Teaching Composition (3)

Provides extensive practical assistance and basic theoretical background for teachers of first-year composition. Required of all new Teaching Assistants in their first semester of teaching first-year composition at UNM. 

531. Teaching Stretch and Studio Composition (3)

This course provides theoretical and practical support for teaching in the Stretch and Studio Composition program. Required of all instructors before teaching Stretch or Studio Composition. Prerequisite: 530. Restriction: permission of instructor.

532. Teaching Multimodal and Online Composition (3)

Provides theory and practical application for teachers of composition who wish to teach online or who wish to incorporate multimodal pedagogies. Required of all teaching assistants who teach online versions of first-year composition. Pre- or corequisite: 530. Restriction: permission of instructor.

533. Teaching Professional and Technical Writing (3)

Provides theory and practice in teaching professional and technical writing at the university level and in training situations. 

534. Composition Theory (3)

Provides an overview of various theories from the 1960s to the present shaping the way writing is taught. Topics include theories of audience, genre, process, collaboration, second language writing, and multimodal composition. 

540 / 440. Topics in Language or Rhetoric (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

An overview of a defined theme or issue in language or rhetorical theory. Recent topics have included Discourse Analysis/Text Linguistics, Survey of American English, Narrative Theory and Literature, Epistemic Rhetoric and Language Studies, such as Old Norse.

541 / 441. English Grammars (3)

A survey of various grammar models and their applications to analysis of the English language.

542 / 442. Major Texts in Rhetoric (3)

A survey of rhetorical and language theories from the classical period through the 18th century.

543. Contemporary Texts in Rhetoric (3)

A survey of rhetorical and language theories from the 19th and 20th centuries that shape contemporary approaches to discourse, text and persuasion.

545 / 445. History of the English Language (3)

An historical survey of the etymology, morphology, phonetics and semantics of English, as well as the relation between the English language and cultural change.

547 / 447. Introductory Old English (3)

(Also offered as LING 547 / 447) An introduction to the grammar, syntax, and phonology of Old English. Prepares students for more advanced studies in this and later periods.

548 / 448. Topics in Advanced Old English (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intensive advanced study of Old English literature alternating between Beowulf and other major works of Old English poetry and prose. Prerequisite: 547 / 447.

549 / 449. Middle English Language (3)

(Also offered as LING 449) Comprehensive study of Middle English dialects and the development of Middle English from Old English. Prepares students for Middle English literature.

550 / 450. Middle English Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Middle English literature in the original, excluding Chaucer; alternates with Medieval Lyrics, Medieval Romance, Saints Lives.

551 / 451. Topics in Medieval Studies (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Advanced study of specialized aspects in medieval studies, such as manuscripts; paleography; research methods; Old Norse studies; medieval Latin sources; cultural, feminist, and historical theoretical approaches to literature; medievalism in Britain and America; history of scholarship.

552 / 452. The Renaissance (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of prose, poetry and/or drama of the 16th century. Emphasis varies.

553 / 453. The Seventeenth Century (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of prose, poetry and/or drama of the 17th century. Emphasis varies.

554 / 454. Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in literature and culture on topics such as Restoration comedy and heroic tragedy, early eighteenth-century satire and major authors such as John Dryden, Aphra Behn, Alexander Pope, Daniel Defoe and Jonathan Swift.

555 / 455. Middle and Late Eighteenth Century (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in literature and culture 1735–1800 on topics such as eighteenth-century theater, the development of fiction, the construction of difference and the representations of the relationship between England and the rest of the world.

556 / 456. British Romanticism (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in the literature and culture of early 19th-century Britain; the Wordsworth circle, the Keats-Shelley circle, Romantic women writers and special topics such as British Culture in the 1790s and Romantic Theory.

557 / 457. Victorian Studies (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in the literature and culture of the Victorian era; recent offerings have included Dickens, the Bronte’s; and special topics such as Sensation’ Detection and the Detective Novel; Victorian Sexualities; and Race, Class and Gender.

558 / 458. Modern British Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the poetry, fiction, drama and nonfiction prose of early 20th-century Britain and Ireland, including the works of Conrad, Yeats, Eliot, Forster, Joyce, Shaw and Woolf.

559 / 459. Irish Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the prose, poetry and drama of Ireland. Alternates between surveys of modern and postmodern Irish literature and special topics or single author courses such as on Yeats or Joyce.

561 / 461. American Romanticism (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the prose and poetry of mid-19th-century America, including writings by the Transcendentalists, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Stowe, Whitman and Dickinson.

562 / 462. American Realism and Naturalism (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the prose and poetry of turn-of-the-century America, including writings by Mark Twain, Henry James, Crane, Wharton, Norris and Gilman.

564 / 464. Advanced Studies in Native American and Indigenous Literature (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Advanced study of Native American and Indigenous literature, with attention to literary history, theory, and critical methodologies. Includes materials beyond American Indian or U.S. contexts, such as First Nations or global Indigenous. 

565 / 465. Chicana/o Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Advanced study of Chicana/o literature, literary history, criticism, theory, novels, short stories, poetry, and film, with emphasis on ethnic, regional, gender, and linguistic identity from nineteenth century to the present.

568 / 468. Topics in American Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intensive study of special topics in American Literature. Offerings have included Literature of the Civil War, 19th-Century American Literature and the Visual Arts, Southern American Literature and American Women Writers.

570 / 470. Modernist Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the poetry, fiction, drama and non-fiction prose of the early 20th century in the United States, Britain and Ireland, with some consideration of the international influence of and upon these literatures. Course content varies from semester to semester.

572 / 472. Contemporary Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of the poetry, fiction, drama and non-fiction prose of the post-1945 era in the United States and Britain, with some consideration of the international influence of and upon these literatures. Course content varies from semester to semester.

574 / 474. Contemporary Southwestern Literature (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

This course presents and analyzes major texts in post-war literature of the southwestern U.S., emphasizing the cultural exchanges among Native, Hispanic and Anglo literature and culture.

578. Topics in Individual Authors (3, may be repeated twice Δ)

Study of one or more authors. Titles of individual sections vary as content varies.

579 / 479. Postcolonial Literatures (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Survey of Postcolonial literatures and theories emanating from the Indian subcontinent, Africa and other countries recently independent from the British Empire.

580 / 480. Topics in British Literature (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Intensive study of special issues and themes, literary movements and single authors in British Literature.

581. Chaucer (3)

Studies in the Canterbury Tales, Parliament of Fowls, House of Fame and other Chaucerian poems, together with a study of the history, philosophy and theology of the time. There will also be discussions of relevant contemporary critical theory. Emphasis varies.

582. Shakespeare (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Intensive study of the major dramatic and non-dramatic works of William Shakespeare. Emphasis varies.

586 / 486. British Fiction (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in the literary and cultural emergence and formation of fiction as a genre in English. Course content varies; recent topics include The Early English Novel; The 18th-Century Comic Novel; and Race, Class and Gender in the 19th-Century Novel.

587. Genre Studies (3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Studies in one or more of the major genres of literature, including narrative fiction, poetics, comedy, epic, satire and tragedy.

592. Teaching Literature and Literary Studies (3)

Practicum on teaching literature and literary studies. Study of theoretical discourses about teaching also included. Topics vary.

596. Portfolio (1 or 3)

Directed preparation of the Master’s Portfolio. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

597. Problems for the Master's Degree (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Intensive, directed study at the Master’s level of particular topics and issues pertaining to the various fields in English. Permission of the Departmental Graduate Director required prior to registration.

598. Graduate Internship (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Internships in professional, technical, and creative writing supervised by individual faculty members. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

610. Seminar: Studies in Criticism and Theory (3, no limit Δ)

An in-depth investigation of a defined theme or issue in Literary Criticism and Theory; topics vary.

640. Seminar: Studies in Language or Rhetoric (3, no limit Δ)

An in-depth investigation of a defined theme or issue in language theory or rhetoric. Recent topics have included Metaphor and Stylistics, ESL Grammar for Adults and Epistemic Rhetoric.

650. Seminar: Studies in British Literature (3, no limit Δ)

An in-depth investigation of a defined theme or issue in British Literature; topics vary.

660. Seminar: Studies in American Literature (3, no limit Δ)

An in-depth investigation of a defined theme or issue in American Literature; topics vary.

680. Seminar: Studies in Genre, Backgrounds, Forces (3, no limit Δ)

An in-depth investigation of special topics pertaining to the study of British and American Literature and related fields of study.

697. Problems for the Doctor's Degree (1-3, no limit Δ)

Intensive, directed study at the Doctoral level of particular topics and issues pertaining to the various fields in English. Permission of the Departmental Graduate Director required prior to registration.

698. Independent Study (1-3, may be repeated once Δ)

Permission of the Departmental Graduate Director required prior to registration.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Environmental Science (ENVS)


1130 [GEOL 1120] [ENVS 101]. The Blue Planet [Environmental Geology] [The Blue Planet] (3)

***NOTE: This course is active as of the Spring 2020 semester.*** To understand global change and environmental concerns, this course weaves together an understanding of Earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere and oceans and how ecosystems are linked to the physical environment. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll concurrently in 1130L. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

1130L [GEOL 1120L] [ENVS 102L]. The Blue Planet Laboratory [Environmental Geology Laboratory] [The Blue Planet Laboratory] (1)

***NOTE: This course is active as of the Spring 2020 semester.*** Introductory environmental earth science laboratory. Includes minerals, rocks, and rock cycle, topographic maps, local geology and groundwater, weather and climate. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Pre- or corequisite: 1130.

315. Statistics and Data Analysis (3)

Exploration of basic statistical representations of earth science data, matrix algebra, and multivariate data analysis and Fourier analysis. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1512.

320L. Environmental Systems (4)

Analysis of environmental science data focusing on local water, soil, atmospheric, and bedrock systems and comparisons to analogous systems around the world. Prerequisite: ((1130 and 1130L) or (GEOL 1110 and GEOL 1110L)) and (MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512).

321L. Earth Materials and Critical Zone Geology (4)

Rocks and minerals form a critical foundation for all Earth's systems, and understanding the chemical composition and physical characteristics of these Earth's materials is important for work in Environmental Sciences. Prerequisite: 320L and CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L and (MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512).

322L. Life and the Earth System (4)

Investigation of the co-evolution of the Earth and life, including origins and evolution of life, ecology and biogeography, biogeochemical cycles, and the impact of a dynamic Earth environment on major radiations and extinctions. Prerequisite: 321L and BIOL 1140 and BIOL 1140L.

323L. Water in the Earth System (4)

Quantitative treatment of the global hydrologic cycle and links to the broader Earth System, including precipitation, evaportranspiration, infiltration, runoff and subsurface flow; global change and catchment and hillslope hydrology; hydrologic ecosystem interactions; water chemistry evolution. Prerequisite: (321L or EPS **304L) and PHYS 1310. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 1522.

324. Earth's Climatic Environment (3)

Basic process-based understanding of Earth's climate system using physics-based problem-solving skills and applying scientific concepts related to understanding the Earth's climatic system. Prerequisite: 323L.

330. Environmental Systems (3)

Study of the human relationship to and impact on the physical environment. Sustainable development and management of resources. Global change and implications for ecosystems. Environmental law, policy, regulations and ethics. Prerequisite: (1130 or GEOL 1110) and ((BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110C) or (MATH 1512 or PHYS 1310)) and CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L. {Fall}

430L / 530L. Advanced Environmental Science (4)

Application of basic science to the interdisciplinary study of environmental systems. Causes of and solutions to land, air, water and ecosystem degradation. Prerequisite: 324 or (330 and (BIOL 1140 or BIOL 2110C) and MATH 1522 and PHYS 1310). {Spring}

530L / 430L. Advanced Environmental Science (4)

Application of basic science to the interdisciplinary study of environmental systems. Causes of and solutions to land, air, water and ecosystem degradation. {Spring}




Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS)


**300. Topics in Geology (1-4, may be repeated once Δ)

Summary of specific areas of geology, designed especially for earth science teachers and other nontraditional students. Subjects may vary from year to year; lectures normally supplemented by laboratory exercises.

**301. Mineralogy/Earth and Planetary Materials (3)

Introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry and their relation to physical and chemical properties of materials. Overview of major structure types and crystal chemistry/occurrence of common rock-forming minerals. EPS majors must enroll in **301 and **302L in the same semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L. {Fall}

**302L. Mineralogy Laboratory (2)

Laboratory exercises in crystallography and crystal chemistry. Hand specimen identification of the common rock-forming minerals. {Fall}

**303L. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4)

Introduction to processes leading to formation of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Emphasis on plate tectonic settings and interactions between physical and chemical processes. Prerequisite: **301 and **302L. {Spring}

**304L. Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)

Elrick. Introduction to origin, petrology and stratigraphic occurrence of sedimentary rocks. Prerequisite: **301 and **302L and GEOL 2110C.

**307L. Structural Geology (4)

Karlstrom. Nature and origin of rock structures and deformation; map and stereographic projection problems; stress and strain. Prerequisite: **304L and (PHYS 1230 or PHYS 1310). Pre- or corequisite: **303L. {Spring}

310L. New Mexico Field Geology (4)

Scientific method based on field observation, analysis of geologic phenomena and geologic history of New Mexico. Written report for each 4-hour field trip to outcrops in the Albuquerque area. Prerequisite: (ENVS 1130 or GEOL 1110) and (ENVS 1130L or GEOL 1110L).

**319L. Introductory Field Geology (4)

Principles and techniques of basic field mapping, layout, preparation, and presentation of maps and cross-sections; construction of geologic reports. Offered as a 3-week summer course (20 consecutive days). Prerequisite: **304L and **307L.

352. Global Climate Change (3)

(Also offered as GEOG 352) Gutzler. Comparison of natural and anthropogenic causes of large-scale climate change. Factors influencing development of mitigation of adaptation policies. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512.

**365. Exploring the Solar System (3)

Agee. Survey of space exploration past, present, and future. Detailed overview of solar system formation, the Sun, the planets and their moons, asteroids, comets, meteorites and astrobiology.

*400. Topics in Earth and Planetary Sciences (1-4, may be repeated once Δ)



401 / 501. Colloquium (1, may be repeated twice Δ)

Current topics in geology. For graduate students, may be repeated once for credit towards degree. See description for *490. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Restriction: junior or senior standing.

405L / 505L. Stable Isotope Geochemistry (3)

Sharp. Examinations of principles governing the distribution of stable isotopes in geological materials and their applications in understanding geochemical processes. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L and MATH 1522.

410 / 510. Fundamentals of Geochemistry (3)

Asmeron. Geochemistry of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Geochemical methodology. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1225 and MATH 1240.

*411L. Invertebrate Paleontology (4)

Kues. General principles and familiarization with diagnostic features of fossils. Introduction to environmental implications. 8 hours of EPS or BIOL recommended. Prerequisite: (BIOL 203 and BIOL 203L) or GEOL 2110C.

415 / 515. Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)

Crossey. Principles of aqueous chemistry and processes controlling the composition of natural waters: streams, lakes, groundwater and the oceans. Prerequisite: **304L or (CHEM 1225 and CHEM 1225L).

420L / 520L. Topics in Advanced Field Geology (2-4 to a maximum of 8 Δ)

Karlstrom. Advanced geological field techniques; special field problems concentrating on the tectonic evolution of the Rocky Mountain region. Offered as a 3-week course (20 consecutive days). Prerequisite: **319L. {Summer}

427 / 527. Geophysics (3)

(Also offered as PHYC **327) Applications of gravity, magnetics, seismology, heat flow to the structure, constitution and deformation of earth. Related aspects of plate tectonics and resource exploration. Prerequisite: MATH 1522 and PHYS 1320.

428 / 528. Applied Mathematics for Earth and Environmental Sciences (3)

Introduction to linear algebra, differential equations, and vector calculus with applications to hydrology, geophysics, and atmospheric sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1522.

436 / 536. Climate Dynamics (3)

Gutzler. A quantitative introduction to the Earth’s climate system, emphasizing processes responsible for maintaining the current climate and governing climate change on global and regional scales, including interactions between the atmosphere, ocean and biosphere. Prerequisite: PHYS 1310.

*439. Paleoclimatology (3)

Fawcett. History of the Earth’s climate. Examination of methods in climactic reconstruction and mechanisms of climactic change. Emphasis on Pleistocene and Holocene climactic records. Prerequisite: ENVS 1130 or GEOL 1110.

445 / 545. Topics in Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (1-4, may be repeated five times Δ)

Variable course content depending on student interest. Topics may include physical sedimentology, sequence stratigraphy, basin analysis, cycle stratigraphy and chemostratigraphy.

450L / 550L. Volcanology (4)

Fischer. Characteristics and mechanism of volcanic systems, volcanism in various continental and marine tectonic settings. Laboratory to include field and laboratory examination of volcanic rocks and structures and models of volcanic processes. Prerequisite: **303L.

455L / 555L. Computational and GIS Applications in Geomorphology (3)

Scuderi. Techniques in acquisition, processing, analysis and display of digital, aerial photo and remote-sensing data; regional quantitative morphometry; use of topography and geology with GIS in landscape evolution and analysis. Prerequisite: 433 and 481L.

462 / 562. Hydrogeology (3)

(Also offered as CE 441 / 541) Weissmann. Hydrologic and geologic factors controlling groundwater flow, including flow to wells. The hydrologic cycle; interactions between surface and subsurface hydrologic systems; regional flow systems. Groundwater geochemistry and contaminant transport. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L and MATH 1522 and PHYS 1310.  Restriction: senior standing.

476 / 576. Physical Hydrology (3)

(Also offered as WR 576) Quantitative treatment of the hydrologic cycle–precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff and subsurface flow; global change and hydrology; catchment and hillslope hydrology; hydrologic system–ecosystem interactions; hydrology and water resources management. Prerequisite: MATH 1522 and PHYS 1310.  Restriction: junior or senior standing. {Fall}

481L / 581L. Geomorphology and Surficial Geology (4)

Meyer. Origin and development of landforms with emphasis on weathering, soils, hillslope processes, fluvial systems and surficial geology; occasional field trips. Prerequisite: (ENVS 1130 and ENVS 1130L) or (GEOL 1110 and GEOL 1110L).

482L / 582L. Geoarchaeology (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 482L / 582L) Smith. Application of geological concepts to archaeological site formation with emphasis on pre-ceramic prehistory of the southwestern United States. Quaternary dating methods, paleoenvironment, landscape evolution, depositional environments. Quaternary stratigraphy, soil genesis, sourcing of lithic materials, site formation processes. Required field trip. Prerequisite: ANTH 1211 and ANTH 1211L and ANTH 2175 and GEOL 1110 and GEOL 1110L.  Restriction: junior or senior standing. {Alternate Years}

485L / 585L. Soil Stratigraphy and Morphology (3)

McFadden. Application of soils studies to stratigraphic analysis and mapping of Quaternary deposits and geomorphic surfaces; survey of soil classifications; field description of soil profiles; development of soil chronosequences and catenas. Prerequisite: ENVS 1130 or GEOL 1110.

*490. Geologic Presentation (1)

Student review of geologic literature; preparation and critique of oral presentations. Prerequisite: **301 or ENVS 330. Corequisite: EPS 401.

491–492. Problems (1-3; 1-3)



493. Independent Study (3)

Independent study for departmental honors. Prerequisite: **303L or ENVS 330.

495. Senior Thesis (3)

Candidacy for honors in Earth and Planetary Sciences. Prerequisite: 493.

501 / 401. Colloquium (1, may be repeated twice Δ)

Current topics in geology. For graduate students, may be repeated once for credit towards degree. See description for *490. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

502. Center for Stable Isotopes Seminar (1, may be repeated eight times Δ)

(Also offered as ANTH 502) Students will be exposed to cutting edge isotope-focused interdisciplinary research in a lecturer, discussion and constructive feedback setting. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

505L / 405L. Stable Isotope Geochemistry (3)

Sharp. Examinations of principles governing the distribution of stable isotopes in geological materials and their applications in understanding geochemical processes. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1215L and MATH 1522.

507L. Thermodynamics and Physical Foundations of Geochemistry (4)

Sharp. Thermodynamics and application to geologic systems, phase equilibria, phase rule, ideal and nonideal solutions. Prerequisite: **303L and MATH 1522.

510 / 410. Fundamentals of Geochemistry (3)

Asmeron. Geochemistry of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Geochemical methodology. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1225 and MATH 1240.

513. Planetary Materials and the Evolution of the Solar System (3)

Discussion of the origin and evolution of the planets, including planet Earth, based on study of lunar samples, terrestrial samples and meteorites; theory; earth based observations; and space missions.

515 / 415. Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)

Crossey. Principles of aqueous chemistry and processes controlling the composition of natural waters: streams, lakes, groundwater and the oceans.

516. Selected Topics in Geomorphology (3, may be repeated five times Δ)

McFadden, Meyer.

518L. Electron Microprobe Analysis (3)

Theory and practice of electron microprobe analysis emphasizing geological materials. Restriction: permission of instructor and a demonstrated need for the use of instrument.

520L / 420L. Topics in Advanced Field Geology (2-4 to a maximum of 8 Δ)

Karlstrom. Advanced geological field techniques; special field problems concentrating on the tectonic evolution of the Rocky Mountain region. Offered as a 3-week course (20 consecutive days). Prerequisite: 319L. {Summer}

522. Selected Topics in Geophysics (3, may be repeated five times Δ)

Geissman, Roy. Restriction: permission of instructor.

523. Topics in Tectonics (3, may be repeated five times Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

527 / 427. Geophysics (3)

(Also offered as PHYC **327) Applications of gravity, magnetics, seismology, heat flow to the structure, constitution and deformation of earth. Related aspects of plate tectonics and resource exploration. Prerequisite: MATH 1522 and PHYS 1320.

528 / 428. Applied Mathematics for Earth and Environmental Sciences (3)

Introduction to linear algebra, differential equations, and vector calculus with applications to hydrology, geophysics, and atmospheric sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1522.

534. Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry (3)

Asmerom. Examination of principles governing the abundance of naturally occurring radiogenic isotopes and their use in the study of global geochemical processes.

536 / 436. Climate Dynamics (3)

Gutzler. A quantitative introduction to the Earth’s climate system, emphasizing processes responsible for maintaining the current climate and governing climate change on global and regional scales, including interactions between the atmosphere, ocean and biosphere. PHYS 1310 is recommended.

538L. Analytical Electron Microscopy (3)

Principles and practical techniques of transmission and analytical electron microscopy for materials characterization. Topics covered include: diffraction and phase contrast image formation, selected area and convergent beam electron diffraction; energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Prerequisite: 587 and 518L.

545 / 445. Topics in Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (1-4, may be repeated five times Δ)

Elrick, Smith. Variable course content depending on student interest. Topics may include physical sedimentology, sequence stratigraphy, basin analysis, cycle stratigraphy and chemostratigraphy.

547–548. Seminar (2-3, may be repeated five times Δ; 2-3, may be repeated five times Δ)



550L / 450L. Volcanology (4)

Fischer. Characteristics and mechanism of volcanic systems, volcanism in various continental and marine tectonic settings. Laboratory to include field and laboratory examination of volcanic rocks and structures and models of volcanic processes. Prerequisite: **303L.

551–552. Problems (1-3; 1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)

Maximum of three units of problems can count toward M.S. or Ph.D. course requirements.

555L / 455L. Computational and GIS Applications in Geomorphology (3)

Scuderi. Techniques in acquisition, processing, analysis and display of digital, aerial photo and remote-sensing data; regional quantitative morphometry; use of topography and geology with GIS in landscape evolution and analysis.

562 / 462. Hydrogeology (3)

(Also offered as CE 541 / 441) Weissmann. Hydrologic and geologic factors controlling groundwater flow, including flow to wells. The hydrologic cycle; interactions between surface and subsurface hydrologic systems; regional flow systems. Groundwater geochemistry and contaminant transport.

576 / 476. Physical Hydrology (3)

(Also offered as WR 576) Quantitative treatment of the hydrologic cycle–precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff and subsurface flow; global change and hydrology; catchment and hillslope hydrology; hydrologic system–ecosystem interactions; hydrology and water resources management. Prerequisite: MATH 1522 and PHYS 1310. {Fall}

581L / 481L. Geomorphology and Surficial Geology (4)

Meyer. Origin and development of landforms with emphasis on weathering, soils, hillslope processes, fluvial systems and surficial geology; occasional field trips. Intro to Geology or Environmental Science recommended.

582L / 482L. Geoarchaeology (3)

(Also offered as ANTH 582L / 482L) Smith. Application of geological concepts to archaeological site formation with emphasis on pre-ceramic prehistory of the southwestern United States. Quaternary dating methods, paleoenvironment, landscape evolution, depositional environments. Quaternary stratigraphy, soil genesis, sourcing of lithic materials, site formation processes. Required field trip. {Alternate Years}

585L / 485L. Soil Stratigraphy and Morphology (3)

McFadden. Application of soils studies to stratigraphic analysis and mapping of Quaternary deposits and geomorphic surfaces; survey of soil classifications; field description of soil profiles; development of soil chronosequences and catenas.  Prerequisite: ENVS 1130 or GEOL 1110.

587. Advanced Mineralogy (3)

Brearley. Crystallographic principles; structure, chemistry, physical properties of rock forming minerals. Prerequisite: **301 and **302L and CHEM 1225 and CHEM 1225L.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Fine Art (FA)


105. Fine Arts Co-op Work Phase (0)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

229. Topics (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Interdisciplinary topics in fine arts.

284. Experiencing the Arts (3)

Explores fundamental connections and differences among artistic media through readings, lectures, attendance at artistic exhibits and events, and discussions with creators of collaborative works of art. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

329. Historical Interdisciplinary Topics (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Analyzes major instances of interdisciplinary influence and collaboration in the history of the arts.

384. Interdisciplinary Topics (3 to a maximum of 15 Δ)

Course may be repeated for credit up to four times, as long as the content varies with approval from Associate Dean.

387. Seminar in Interdisciplinary Arts (3)

This course will focus on collaborative and interdisciplinary practice in the arts and will provide openings for students to expand their current projects into cross-disciplinary works.

394. Problems in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

An independent study in either critical studies or studio, beyond the scope of the Fine Arts interdisciplinary courses, which may occur within or outside the College of Fine Arts.

*395. Topics in Arts and Community (3)

Examines topics in arts and community as a basis for exploring contemporary arts practices. Subjects will be explored through guest lectures, site visits, and student research.  Prerequisite: ALBS 2110.

*401. Healing Arts I: Whole Person Care (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Exploring the transformative power of the creative process and the healing arts in relationship to physical, mental, and spiritual health, this course emphasizes personal discovery of health and wholeness. Restriction: junior standing or above.

*402. Healing Arts II: Intersecting Creativity, Communication, and Collaborations (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Exploring the nature of creative collaboration, the essential role communication plays in the collaborative process, and the transformative/healing potentialities that lie therein, participants will engage in multiple collaborations and improve their communication skills. Restriction: junior standing or above.

*403. Healing Arts III: Body As Living Story (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course explores the multidimensional and complex nature of the body while investigating how "dis-ease" within the body may reflect a person's "living story". Focuses: Allopathic medicine, major bodily systems and alternative approaches to healing. Restriction: junior standing or above.

*475. The Professional Print Workshop (2)

Devon Topics related to the operation of a professional printmaking workshop including history, business structures, ethics and marketing. {Fall}

*476. The Professional Printer (4)

Hamon Advanced techniques in lithography with emphasis on development of skills necessary for the master printer. Lecture and practicum topics include theory and chemistry of lithography, collaboration, edition printing, workshop management and paper. Restriction: permission of instructor. {Fall}

*486. Healing Arts IV: Arts-Based Community Engaged Projects (3, may be repeated once Δ)

Students will study contemporary models of arts-based community projects from around the world and work on a single arts-based community project in collaboration with a local organization. Restriction: junior standing or above.

*487. Healing Arts V: Independent Study (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course provides an opportunity for advanced, concentrated, and individually directed study in the area of the healing arts requiring research, writing, and/or practice. Prerequisite: *401 and *402 and *403. Restriction: junior standing or above, and permission of instructor.

496. Interdisciplinary Arts Capstone Project (3)

This course is the final project for B.A. in Interdisciplinary Arts. The course topics and focus center on professional practices and critical discourse for interdisciplinary and collaborative artists. Prerequisite: 284 and *395.

*497. Healing Arts VI: Practicum (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This internship will be collaboratively designed by student and faculty advisor with the goal of providing a more comprehensive and in-depth experience of facilitating healing arts in either a medical or community setting. Prerequisite: *401 and *402 and *403 and (*486 or *487). Restriction: junior standing or above, and permission of instructor.




Family and Child Studies (See also: FCST) (FCS)


102. Carpe Noctem: Sleep, Health, and the Family (3)

Students will learn about issues in sleep research with a focus on the examination of sleep in the family context. The course will emphasize how family processes influence sleep across development and vice versa.

302. Emergent Literacy: Birth through Pre-K (3)

This advanced course prepares early childhood professionals to teach reading and writing in Birth to Pre-K classrooms. This course covers a broad spectrum of topics relevant to the teaching of reading. Prerequisite: 311 and 321 and 401.

304. Growth and Development in Middle Childhood (3)

Principles of growth and development for 6 to 11-year-olds in language, cognitive, physical, motor, social and emotional areas. Influences on development included.

305. Research and Evaluation in Family and Child Studies (3)

A course focusing on research and evaluation.  Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies. {Spring}

310. Friends and Intimate Relationships (3)

Survey of the research concerning friends and intimate relationships. Focus on the dynamic characteristics of friendship and other intimate relationships.

311. Family, Language and Culture (3)

This advanced course prepares prospective teachers for working effectively as partners with diverse family and community members to facilitate the development and learning of children birth through age 8, including children with special needs. Prerequisite: ECED 1130. {Fall}

312. Parent-Child Interactions (3)

Dynamic interactions of parents and children throughout the life cycle in diverse family configurations.

313. Family Theories (3)

Family theories, conceptual frameworks and research relevant to current family lifestyles including single parents, remarried, same sex, cohabitants.

315. Adolescent Development in the Family (3)

Developmental interaction and communication patterns of adolescents within a family setting.

316. Early Childhood Pedagogy and Curriculum (3)

Course focuses on developmentally appropriate practices and content, learning environments, and curriculum implementation for children in Pre-K through 3rd grade. It emphasizes integration of content areas including reading/writing, math, science, and technology. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies, and junior or senior standing.

321. Young Children and Diverse Abilities (3)

Advanced course building upon student understanding of connections among learning, teaching, assessment and program evaluation strategies.  Specific focus on educational policies, programs, practices, services appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, early primary children exhibiting delays and disabilities. Prerequisite: 220.

341. Ecological Aspects of Housing (3)

Variations in housing structures and the impact of housing on family functioning.

343. Family Management Theories (3)

Comparison of current theories of family management.

344. Consumer Decisions (3)

Role of the family member as a consumer and exploration of the resources available for purchase decisions.

391 / 591. Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ; 1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

395. Field Experience (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Combines 120 hours of practical experience in agency or institutional setting with class seminar. Students apply and integrate knowledge and skills for working with or on behalf of individuals and/or families.

401. Research in Child Growth, Development and Learning (3)

This advanced course in child growth, development, and learning builds upon the foundational material covered in the basic course in child growth, development, and learning. An integration of major theories of child development is provided. Prerequisite: ECED 1110. {Fall}

402. Teaching and Learning Reading and Writing (3)

This advanced course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals to understand and to teach. This course focuses on reading as a complex, interactive, constructive process. Prerequisite: 202. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies. {Fall, Spring}

403. Growth and Development of the Preschool Child (3)

Developmental principles and recent research on language, cognitive, physical-motor and social-emotional development of the preschool child. Corequisite: 407L.

405. Advanced Caregiving for Infants and Toddlers (3)

This advanced course prepares early childhood professionals to teach reading and writing in K-3 classrooms. A broad spectrum of topics relevant to the teaching of reading are covered. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies, and junior or senior standing.

406. Teaching and Learning Math and Science (4)

This course focuses on the standards, principles, and practices in teaching mathematics and science to young children in preschool through grade 3. An emphasis is placed on developing a content-rich integrated math and science curriculum. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies, and junior or senior standing.

407L. Preschool Child Laboratory (1)

Laboratory experience in child care center; must be taken concurrently with 403. Includes participation or observation/participation. Hours arranged. Pre- or corequisite: 403.

408. Teaching and Learning in Social Studies, Fine Arts and Movement (3)

This course emphasizes an integrated approach to teaching the “what and why” of social studies, fine arts and movement; assessing student learning; planning units, lessons, and activities; developing effective instructional strategies. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies, and junior or senior standing.

*411. Marriage and Family Life Education (3)

Philosophies and processes of family life education programs (FLE).

412. Fathering (3)

This course will examine fathers’ role in child development across cultural groups. Conceptualization of fathering and the relationship between cultural beliefs and fathering behaviors will be explored.

416. Adult Development in the Family (3)

Examination of the biological, psychological and sociocultural aspects of adult development and aging and their dynamic interactions within the context of diverse family structures and lifestyles. Implications for prevention and intervention strategies discussed.

417L. Teaching and Learning Practicum (2)

This advanced practicum provides opportunities for students to develop, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate and integrated learning experiences for children in K-3rd grade. This 2 credit-hour practicum requires 60 supervised contact hours. Pre- or corequisite: 402. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies. {Fall, Spring}

440. Student Teaching Seminar (3)

Weekly seminar where students engage in critical reflection and discussion of their own practice, and make connections between theory and practice. Students focus on developing competencies, self-assessment, and develop a professional portfolio. Prerequisite: 311 and 321 and 401 and 406 and 408 and 417L and ECED 1115 and ECED 1120 and ECED 2110 and ECED 2115 and ECED 2120 and ECED 2121 and ECED 2130 and ECED 2131. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies, and senior standing.

440L. Student Teaching Laboratory (9)

Student teaching experience in early childhood including placement and assigned tasks in an early childhood classroom with a mentor teacher, and a weekly seminar where students review and reflect on their own teaching practices. Prerequisite: 305 and 401 and 402 and 417L. Restriction: admitted to B.S. Family and Child Studies. {Fall, Spring}

443. Application of Family Management Theories (3)

Discussion of working with family members to identify and help meet family demands with an emphasis on family resource use. Includes 40 hours in a field setting.

481. Public Policy and Advocacy in Family and Child Studies (3)

Synthesis of issues in Family Studies with emphasis on the formulation and impact of public policies. Restriction: junior or senior standing.

*484. The Sociocultural Context of Families (3)

Survey of family dynamics of ethnic minority families in the U.S. Topics include gender roles, mate selection, conjugal power, intermarriage, child development, parenting, the elderly, kinship patterns and reciprocal impact of social environments and family systems.

493 / 593. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ; 1-3, no limit Δ)



497. Reading and Research in Honors I (2)

Advanced studies and research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Restriction: permission of instructor.

498. Reading and Research in Honors II (2)

Advanced studies and research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Prerequisite: 497. Restriction: permission of instructor.

499. Honors Thesis (2)

Prerequisite: 498. Restriction: permission of instructor.

501. Parent Education (3)

Focus on philosophy of parent education, including content, processes, procedures, techniques and resources. Implications of child development principles from infancy through adolescence for parenting will be examined.

502. Developmental Issues in Families: Early Childhood (3)

Addresses developmental issues in families with children from birth through age 8, including all aspects of development in children, with developmental implications for family members, based on contemporary research. Prerequisite: a course in human development, early childhood or developmental psychology.

503. Seminar in Human Growth and Development (3)

Theories and research relevant to human growth and development across the life span, including implications for education, child rearing and counseling.

504. Developmental Issues in Families: Middle Childhood and Adolescence (3)

Physical, affective, social and language/cognitive development in middle childhood and adolescence. Ecological and relational influences will be emphasized, including school, gender, social class, family and peer relationships. {Offered in rotation with two other developmental courses}

508. Developmental Issues in Families: Adulthood and Aging (3)

Current issues concerning the biological, psychological and sociocultural aspects of adult development and aging within the contexts of diverse family structures and lifestyles will be examined through the study of the relevant research literature. {Offered in rotation with 502 and 504}

513. Current Issues in Family and Child Studies (3, no limit Δ)

Topics vary from term to term, but are all critically important for Family Studies. They include but are not limited to: Death and Dying and Family Violence.

514. Fatherhood (3)

A critical examination of issues related to fatherhood including the multiple dimensions of paternal involvement, influences on involvement and consequences of involvement. The course examines multiple perspectives and frameworks for understanding fatherhood.

515. Young Children Moving Into Literacy (3)

This course explores the processes of young children s emergent literacy. It focuses on selection of materials and design of activities appropriate for use in the home, school and other settings. Prerequisite: EDUC 331L and EDUC 333L. {Summer}

516. Advanced Study of Early Childhood Curriculum (3)

This course focuses on investigating early childhood curricula for children birth to 3rd grade. Students conduct studies to gain deeper understandings of current curricula, theoretical foundations, related trends and issues, and impact on children's learning.

517. Family Interaction Theories (3)

Review of salient theories and dynamics involved in understanding interaction patterns within contemporary families. The ability to analyze relationships is emphasized. Restriction: permission of instructor.

543. Managing Family Resources (3)

A survey of the research in the field of family management to include family resources, decision making and work allocation. Prerequisite: a course in family management theories or permission of instructor.

546. Family Systems Theories (3)

This course examines the development of family systems theories from the physical and biological sciences and explores current use within a broader ecosystemic perspective. Implications for research, education and clinical practice are illustrated and discussed.

547. Global Perspectives in Early Childhood Education (3)

This course focuses on how, and why, Early Childhood Education programs and policies vary in different countries and regions. It examines research that analyzes, comparatively, the history and current dimensions of such programs and policies.

570. Research Methods in Family and Child Studies (3)

Research design and methods used in research with families. Includes individual projects.

576. Teaching and Learning Through Play (3)

This course explores the philosophical and theoretical foundations of play and its impact on children's development and learning. Students explore current research, issues, and trends related to play in early childhood programs. {Fall}

581. Seminar in Legal, Ethical and Policy Issues in Family and Child Studies (3)

Examination and analysis of contemporary issues relating to families from legal, ethical and policy perspectives. Development of a code of ethics for family professionals. Restriction: admitted to Ph.D. Family and Child Studies.

584. Multicultural Issues: Working with Families (3)

Provides information specific to various subcultures in the U.S.A., including cultural self-awareness, and the development of multicultural competence for successful interaction. Emphasis is on research findings on multicultural issues working with children, adults and families.

591 / 391. Problems (1-3 to a maximum of 12 Δ; 1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credit hours for Master’s Plan I and a maximum of 12 credit hours for Master’s Plan II.

593 / 493. Topics (1-3, no limit Δ; 1-3, no limit Δ)

Various current topics in family studies are offered on a trial basis before they are established as permanent courses. Additional information may be obtained from the program.

595. Advanced Field Experiences (3)

Course completed in a setting where student will work with families and/or individuals. Students must participate in 160 hours. Restriction: permission of instructor.

596. Graduate Research Seminar (3)

Designed for non-thesis M.A. Family and Child Studies students to complete a scholarly research project. In this project, students are expected to demonstrate skills and knowledge in research methods, statistics, and academic writing.  Prerequisite: 570 and EDPY 511. Restriction: admitted to M.A. Family and Child Studies.

598. Directed Readings in Family and Child Studies (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Independent readings to be arranged with individual faculty.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

See Graduate Programs for total credit requirements. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

610. Applied Developmental Science in Families (3)

This advanced doctoral seminar explores the application of Developmental Science to the understanding of human development in families.

614. Globalization and International Families (3)

This course discusses empirical findings and conceptual, descriptive, and cultural frameworks for understanding diverse forms and functions of the family in a global context.

615. Human Development in Cultural Contexts (3)

This course explores theories and methodological commitments of developmental cultural psychology. It analyzes issues, trends, and controversies in relation to current and future empirical work.

620. Sleep and Family Processes (3)

Students will learn about issues in sleep research with a focus on the examination of sleep in the family context. The course will emphasize how family processes influence sleep across development and vice versa.

622. Seminar in Advanced Study of Early Childhood Education (3)

This advanced studies course focuses on multiple dimensions associated with educating children birth to 3rd grade. Discussions topics include current literature, investigations of practice, tensions between policy and practice, advocacy, initiatives, and exemplary programs.

625. Seminar in Self Regulation (3)

Advanced doctoral seminar explores the field of self-regulation from an ecological, developmental, and applied approach. Related constructs will be explored as well as diverse theories and applications.

670. Advanced Seminar in Theory and Research in Family and Child Studies I (3)

The first half of a two-semester course examining the nature of theories, theoretical approaches to the study of families and the application of various theories of human development. Restriction: admitted to Ph.D. Family and Child Studies.

671. Advanced Seminar in Theory and Research in Family and Child Studies II (3)

The second half of a two-semester course examining the application of certain theories to research on families and the implications of family theories for education, prevention and social policies. Prerequisite: 670. Restriction: admitted to Ph.D. Family and Child Studies.

699. Doctoral Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Students may not receive credit in dissertation until the semester in which the doctoral comps are passed. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




Family and Child Studies (See also: FCS) (FCST)


1120 [FCS 105]. Introduction to Family and Child Studies (3)

An introduction to the profession of Family Studies including content areas, community agencies and career opportunities.

2130 [FCS 213]. Marriage and Family Relationships (3)

Overview of significant research and theories in premarital, marital and family relationships.




Film and Digital Media Arts (FDMA)


1210 [MA 111]. Digital Video Production I [Technical Introduction to Video Production] (3)

An introduction to digital video production. Students learn camera operation, lights and audio equipment. Hands-on production is completed in the studio and on location. Special fee required.

1520 [IFDM 105L]. Introduction to Film and Digital Media [Introduction to Digital Media] (3)

The history of methods and practices of art, science and technology in the development of new media, with surveys from a historical perspective. Studies the practices, careers and disciplines involved with film and digital media.

1996 [IFDM 250]. Topics [Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Film and Digital Media] (1-3, no limit Δ)



2110 [MA 210]. Introduction to Film Studies (3)

Analysis of film as a unique art, and a survey of main trends in film history. Screenings and critical study of major films. Special fee required. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts.

2195 [MA 212]. Beyond Hollywood (3)

An introduction to marginalized cinemas with screenings of major works. Special fee required.

2280 [MA 216]. Topics in Videomaking [Topics in Video Making] (3, may be repeated once Δ)

These courses strengthen students’ skills in video technology while helping them write, direct, and edit video projects that begin to reflect a personal, artistic vision. Special fee required. Prerequisite: 1210.

2286 [IFDM 205L]. Activating Digital Space [Studio I: Activating Digital Space] (3)

This studio course explores critical, technical and creative elements of digital space. By translating the process of seeing and conceptualizing into visual forms, students use technical knowledge to conceptualize, create and collaborate on projects. Prerequisite: 1210.

2520 [IFDM 301]. Introduction to Cinematography [Cinematography] (3)

Through lecture, lab and practical exercises, students will learn the fundamentals of photography and motion picture technical principles. The emphasis will be on the use of professional camera systems. Prerequisite: MA 220.

2530 [IFDM 210]. Introduction to 3D Modeling [Introduction to Modeling and Animation] (3)

An introduction to computer graphics and animation that mixes theory and application using a standard animation software package to teach the use of the tool and to demonstrate key concepts. Involves collaborative projects.

2610 [IFDM 241L]. Directing I [Introduction to Directing for Film and Video] (3)

Students in this introductory class will explore the processes and concerns of the narrative fiction film and video director through the analysis of film and video, and short hands on exercises. Prerequisite: 1210 and (310 or 324).

2714 [IFDM 202]. Introduction to Animation (3)

Practice the principals of animation as defined by Disney master animators. Learn the process, pipeline, tools, and workflow of CG Character Animation.

2768 [IFDM 201]. Introduction to Game Development (3)

Fundamentals of game engine architecture, programming of game design concepts and game mechanics, business and career pathways for game development, and how to use industry development tools. Prerequisite: CS 105L or CS 152L.

300 [IFDM 300]. Critical Intermediations (3)

Examines new media technologies from a transdisciplinary perspective by exploring how the use of new media is affecting academic practice across disciplines. Proposes the development of a critical analytical framework for approaching new media.

302. Digital Game Design (3)

The philosophy of games, game design process, and player psychology. Includes the steps to designing a digital game, from concept and storyboarding to understanding the underlying technical mechanics.

303. Moving Image Art (3)

Creative laboratory exploring aesthetic and theoretical issues relating to moving image art, new media technology, and the creative process. Critiques, technical instruction, and lectures on moving image art history and theory. Prerequisite: 1210.

304. Experiments in Cinema (3)

Work to produce an international, experimental film and video festival. Learn grant writing, the curatorial process, hospitality, promotion, public relations, and the history of film festivals.

308 / *408 [MA 310 / *410]. Latin American Film (3)

This course surveys key moments in Latin American cinema including Mexico’s influential “Golden Age” of the 1940s and various “new cinemas” of the ’60s and ’70s. Also considered are Hollywood films about Latin America. Special fee required.

310 [IFDM 310]. Writing Digital Narrative [Studio II: Writing Digital Narrative] (3)

The goal of this course is to offer students an overview of issues on writing for digital media; its objective is to create successful, media-savvy writers, who work across digital platforms.

311 [IFDM 311]. Fundamentals of Music Technology (2-3)

(Also offered as MUS 311 / 511) A hands-on introduction to various computer applications useful to musicians in all areas of specialization. Various computer programs aiding in music notation, arranging and MIDI composition will be presented and explored.

313. Avant-Garde Film History (3)

Looks at major trends in avant-garde, experimental, and underground filmmaking movements and the artists working outside the boundaries of institutionalized cinema to explore new perceptual frontiers.

314. History of Animation (3)

Traces the development of animation from its earliest filmic examples to the present day, including technological advancements and aesthetic shifts. Covers celluloid, stop-motion, and computer animation history.

324 [MA 324]. Introduction to Screenwriting (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as ENGL 324) Writing workshop on basics of character structure, scenes, visualization, and good old story telling as it applies to the screenplay. Students read scripts, watch film clips, and begin writing an original screenplay.

326 / *426 [MA 326 / *426]. History of Film I [History of Film I: Silent] (3)

History of the motion picture from its beginnings to the era of sound. Screening and analysis of major films. Special fee required. May not receive credit for both 326 and *426. Prerequisite: 2110.

327 / *427 [MA 327 / *427]. History of Film II [History of Film II: Sound] (3)

History of the motion picture from the advent of sound to the present day. Screening and analysis of major films. Special fee required. May not receive credit for both 327 and *427. Prerequisite: 2110.

330 [MA 330]. Studies in Film (3, no limit Δ [3, may be repeated seven times Δ])

Studies in film and video genres, regional and national cinemas, and the work of individual artists. Special fee required. May be repeated if subject matter varies.

331 / *431 [MA 331 / *431]. Film Theory (3)

A lecture survey of major currents in film theory from film’s beginnings to the present. Screening and analysis of major films. May not receive credit for both 331 and *431. Special fee required. Prerequisite: 2110.

332 / *432 [MA 332 / *432]. Documentary Film History and Theory (3)

History and theory of documentary, with emphasis on how this knowledge is applied in the making of a documentary. Screenings of work by Robert Flaherty, Trinh T. Minh-ha, and others. Special fee required.

334 / *434 [MA 334 / *434]. Teen Rebels (3)

An examination of Hollywood films of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, whose youthful main characters challenge convention and authority. Special fee required.

335 / *435 [MA 335 / *435]. International Horror Film (3)

A study of major horror films from various countries, with related readings in fiction, philosophy, psychology, and film studies. Classics such as Nosferatu and Frankenstein are screened. Special fee required.

336 / *436 [MA 336 / *436]. Images of (Wo)men (3)

Our study will regard films about women, men, and everybody else. With feminism, queer theory, critical race studies, and transgender film theory, we’ll consider cinema from “women’s pictures” to films about the permutations of gender. Special fee required.

337 / *437 [MA 337 / *437]. Alfred Hitchcock (3)

An exploration of cinematic suspense, surprise, and shock in relation to Hitchcock’s cinema. Special fee required.

339 [MA 339]. Russian Culture and History through Film (3)

(Also offered as HIST 335; RUSS 339) In this course we study films and read secondary sources from the Soviet and post-Soviet eras (with English subtitles) and examine how they comment on current Russian social and cultural issues. Taught in English. Special fee required.

350 [MA 350]. Advanced Screenwriting (3)

A continuation of Introduction to Screenwriting, this course is a workshop designed to assist the writer in completing scripts for a feature film, two episodes of a television series, or a series of short films. Prerequisite: 324 or ENGL 324.

375. Producing for Film and Digital Media (3)

(Also offered as ALB 375) Students will learn roles of the motion picture producer, acquiring the skills to produce a film or digital media project. Includes choosing a viable project and optioning, developing and preparing for pre-production, production, and post-production.

390 [MA 390]. Topics in the Elements of Filmmaking (3, no limit Δ [3, may be repeated twice Δ])

Practicum in basic conceptual aspects of independent filmmaking. Each student creates cinematic work in this course. Special fee required.

391 [MA 391]. 16mm Filmmaking (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course provides an introduction to basic 16mm filmmaking techniques, with an emphasis on film as a creative art form. Students take up all aspects of filmmaking, from pre-production planning through the final edit. Special fee required.

400 [IFDM 400]. Ethics, Science and Technology (3)

Ethical issues arising from the impact of science and technology on the personal, social and political dimensions of culture or what happens and who takes responsibility when the genie is out of the bottle?

401 [IFDM 401]. Digital Post Production (3)

Designed to expand awareness of the elements of film and video post-production, with emphasis on expanding skills as an editor. Develops competence with tools to practice the art of the editor effectively. Prerequisite: 1210.

402 [IFDM 402]. Documentary Film Production (3)

Hands-on workshop introduces tools and methods of video making in the genre of "creative nonfiction". Emphasizes development of personal approaches to the creative process, technical skills, and familiarity with the documentary form. Prerequisite: 1210.

403 [IFDM 403]. Advanced Game Development (3)

Expands on ideas developed in the introductory course, including new techniques and tools for game development. Students work in collaborative, interdisciplinary game development teams. Prerequisite: 2768.

404 [IFDM 404]. Advanced Animation (3)

Analyze and implement correct physical movement of the human body using animation software. Create solid, finished looking animation for bipedal characters with believable and meaningful performances, including facial animation and speech. Prerequisite: 2714.

405 [IFDM 405]. Advanced Maya Production (3)

Production ready techniques in 3D Computer Graphics and Visual Effects creation, including advanced modeling, rigging, animation, camera mapping and projection, and rendering and compositing using Maya. Prerequisite: 2530.

406 [IFDM 406]. Virtual Reality Cinema (3)

The basics of virtual reality cinema, game building, user experience design, how to make spherical videos for use in virtual reality head mounted displays, and how augmented reality apps work. Prerequisite: 1210.

407 [IFDM 407]. Compositing for Visual Effects (3)

The basics of digital compositing, the art of combining and manipulating images for CGI, special effects, and animation.

*408 / 308 [MA *410 / 310]. Latin American Film (3)

This course surveys key moments in Latin American cinema including Mexico’s influential “Golden Age” of the 1940s and various “new cinemas” of the ’60s and ’70s. Also considered are Hollywood films about Latin America. Special fee required.

*409 [MA *409]. Advanced Video Art (3, may be repeated once Δ)

This class helps students to develop more complex artistic statements on video. Critiques of student work, plus readings and discussions about various arts and media. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

410 [IFDM 410]. The Business and Law of Film and New Media (3)

This course will introduce students to the business and legal aspects of creating a new digital media venture including: concept formation; marketing; budget development; finding financing; forming a company; hiring and managing employees; and sales. Restriction: junior or senior standing.

411. Advanced Cinematography (3)

Work with modern digital professional camera systems, building an understanding of cinematographic techniques, practices, and aesthetics. Use light, color, camera movement, composition, and lens selection to develop cinematic emotions. Prerequisite: 2520.

412 [IFDM 412]. Fundamentals of Audio Technology (2-3)

(Also offered as MUS 412 / 512) Audio editing and equipment and basics of recordings through lab experiences and creative projects. Includes fundamentals of the physics of sound and analysis.

*426 / 326 [MA *426 / 326]. History of Film I [History of Film I: Silent] (3)

History of the motion picture from its beginnings to the era of sound. Screenings and analysis of major films. Special fee required. May not receive credit for both 326 and *426. Prerequisite: 2110.

*427 / 327 [MA *427 / 327]. History of Film II [History of Film II: Sound] (3)

History of the motion picture from the advent of sound to the present day. Screenings and analysis of major films. Special fee required. May not receive credit for both 327 and *427. Prerequisite: 2110.

*429 [FDMA *429]. Topics in Production (1-3, no limit Δ [1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ])

Workshops in specific production topics conducted by guest artists in film and video as their schedules permit. May be repeated if subject matter varies. Special fee required. Prerequisite: 1210.

*430 [MA *430]. Topics in Film History (3, no limit Δ [3, may be repeated seven times Δ])

Studies in film and video genres, regional and national cinemas, and the work of individual artists. Special fee required. May be repeated if subject matter varies.

*431 / 331 [MA *431 / 331]. Film Theory (3)

A lecture survey of major currents in film theory from film’s beginnings to the present. Screening and analysis of major films. May not receive credit for both 331 and *431. Special fee required. Prerequisite: 2110.

*432 / 332 [MA *432 / 332]. Documentary Film History and Theory (3)

History and theory of documentary, with emphasis on how this knowledge is applied in the making of a documentary. Screenings of work by Robert Flaherty, Trinh T. Minh-ha, and others. Special fee required.

*434 / 334 [MA *434 / 334]. Teen Rebels (3)

An examination of Hollywood films of the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, whose youthful main characters challenge convention and authority. Special fee required.

*435 / 335 [MA *435 / 335]. International Horror Film (3)

A study of major horror films from various countries, with related readings in fiction, philosophy, psychology, and film studies. Classics such as Nosferatu and Frankenstein are screened. Special fee required.

*436 / 336 [MA *436 / 336]. Images of (Wo)men (3)

Our study will regard films about women, men, and everybody else. With feminism, queer theory, critical race studies, and transgender film theory, we’ll consider cinema from “women’s pictures” to films about the permutations of gender. Special fee required.

*437 / 337 [MA *437 / 337]. Alfred Hitchcock (3)

An exploration of cinematic suspense, surprise, and shock in relation to Hitchcock’s cinema. Special fee required.

450 [IFDM 450]. Capstone I: Senior Projects [IFDM Capstone I Senior Projects Course] (4)

Students are required to form interdisciplinary collaborative teams that will develop and plan project ideas. Restriction: admitted to B.A. Film and Digital Arts or B.F.A. Film and Digital Arts, senior standing, and permission of department.

451 [IFDM 451]. Capstone II: Senior Projects [IFDM Capstone II Senior Projects Course] (4)

Collaborative teams execute projects and give open demonstration of the results. Prerequisite: 450. Restriction: Restriction: admitted to B.A. Film and Digital Arts or B.F.A. Film and Digital Arts; and senior standing; and permission of department.

*485 [MA *485]. Problems in Interdisciplinary Studies (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, MUS 584) An independent study in either critical studies or studio, beyond the scope of the Fine Arts interdisciplinary courses, which may occur within or outside the College of Fine Arts. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

*487 [MA *487]. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics (3, may be repeated once Δ)

(Also offered as ARTH, DANC, MUS, THEA 487 / 587) Analyzes major instances of interdisciplinary influence and collaboration in the present day. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

491 [IFDM 491]. Topics in Film and Digital Media (1-3, no limit Δ)

This course allows permanent or visiting faculty to develop a course based on a topic related to digital media, and may include courses in career development for media industries.

492 [FDMA 492]. Film and Digital Arts Internship [IFDM Internship] (1-12 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

Real-world experience for students to build film and digital media arts skills in the context of the organization's products or services. Students must possess minimum overall grade-point-average of 2.5 to enroll. Offered on a CR/NC basis only. Prerequisite: at least 9 credit hours in FDMA courses, with at least one FDMA 300-level course. Restriction: admitted or preadmitted to B.F.A. Film and Digital Arts; and permission of department.

496 / 596 [MA 496 / 596]. Undergraduate Production Project (1-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Film and Digital Arts majors undertake individual projects and internships that arise outside the boundaries of other FDMA production courses. The student will enlist the support of a department faculty member to enroll. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

497 / 597 [MA 497 / 597]. Undergraduate Independent Study (2-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Individual investigation or reading, plus the writing of an essay, under faculty direction. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

499 [MA 499]. Honors Thesis (3-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Directed independent study in a field of special interest, culminating in a written thesis and, if appropriate, a film or video project. Open only by invitation to department honors candidates. Special fee required.

596 / 496 [MA 596 / 496]. Graduate Production Project (1-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Film and Digital Arts majors undertake individual projects and internships that arise outside the boundaries of other FDMA production courses. The student will enlist the support of a department faculty member to enroll. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.

597 / 497 [MA 597 / 497]. Graduate Independent Study (2-3 to a maximum of 24 Δ)

Individual investigation or reading, plus the writing of an essay, under faculty direction. Special fee required. Restriction: permission of instructor.




French (FREN)


1110 [101]. French I [Elementary French I] (3)

Intended for students with no previous exposure to French, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills aiming toward the ACTFL novice-high level. This is an introductory course designed to teach the student to communicate in French in everyday situations and to develop an understanding of French and Francophone cultures through the identification of cultural products and practices, of cultural perspectives, and the ability to function at a survival level in an authentic cultural content. This course will also develop the student’s sense of personal and social responsibility through the identification of social issues. Conducted in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 1150 may not be applied toward a degree program. {Fall, Spring}

1120 [102]. French II [Elementary French II] (3)

A continuation of French 1, students will develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first semester, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-low level. This course is designed to increase student fluency in French as applied to everyday situations. Students will also learn to recognize and understand various French and Francophone products, practices, and perspectives, identifying common cultural patterns, describing basic cultural viewpoints, and further developing their sense of personal and social responsibility through the investigation of cultural issues. Conducted in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 1150 may not be applied toward a degree program. {Fall, Spring}

1150 [175]. Accelerated Elementary French (6)

Encompasses the work of 1110-1120. Credit for both this course and FREN 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program.Credit for both this course and FREN 1120 may not be applied toward a degree program.

2110 [201]. French III [Intermediate French I] (3)

In this third semester course, students will continue to develop a broader foundation in skills gained during the first year, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming toward the ACTFL intermediate-mid level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in areas of personal interest and in everyday situations. Students will engage in and analyze various French and Francophone products, practices, and perspectives, as well as continue to develop their sense of personal and social responsibility through comparison and contrast of cultural perspectives. Conducted mostly in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 2140 may not be applied toward a degree program.

2120 [202]. French IV [Intermediate French II] (3)

In this fourth semester course, students will continue to broaden and refine skills gained during previous semesters, including understanding, speaking, reading and writing French aiming at the ACTFL intermediate-high level. This course is designed to teach the student to communicate in a more sustained way in situations that go beyond the everyday. Students will evaluate various French and Francophone products, practices, and create ways to demonstrate their sense of personal and social responsibility through participation in cultural interaction. Conducted entirely in French. Credit for both this course and FREN 2140 may not be applied toward a degree program.

2140 [276]. Intensive Intermediate French [Accelerated Intermediate French] (6)

Encompasses the work of 2110-2120. Credit for both this course and FREN 2110 may not be applied toward a degree program.Credit for both this course and FREN 2120 may not be applied toward a degree program.

2145 [203]. Intermediate French Conversation (3)

Designed primarily to give qualified students of 2110-2120 extra practice in the oral use of the language; therefore, it is recommended that it be taken concurrently with 2110 or 2120. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

301. Advanced Essay and Exploration I (3)

Contextual grammar review and study of stylistics to improve composition skills. Introduction to literature and/or cinema. Taught entirely in French. Prerequisite: 2120 or 2140.

302. Advanced Essay and Exploration II (3)

Advanced grammar and continued stylistic study and discussion of literature and/or film. A stepping stone to the literature and culture classes. Taught entirely in French. Prerequisite: 2120 or 2140.

305. French Pronunciation (3)

Phonetic and phonemic system of French. Required for the undergraduate major. Prerequisite: 2120 or 2140. {Yearly}

307. French Translation (3)

Study of principles and techniques of translating through comparative stylistics. Prerequisite: 301 and 302.

310. French Worlds (3)

A look at French culture, history, and civilization through the ages and through a variety of media. Taught in French. Prerequisite: 301 and 302.

315. French Creativity (3)

Develops students' French skills to an advanced level, introduces them to methods of reading and interpretation necessary for success in advanced courses, and exposes them to literary movements central to French literary traditions. Prerequisite: 301 and 302.

320. French Study Abroad (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)

An introduction to French cultures and language through study abroad. Course locations vary according to course content.

335. Topics in French Literature and Culture in Translation (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, ENGL 335) Study of individual authors, genres and/or periods of French and Francophone literature and culture.

365. Topics in French Cinema (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Topics in French film.

385. Seminars in French Studies (1-4, no limit Δ)

Titles of individual sections will vary as content varies. Topics will deal with specific aspects of French literature, culture and language. Prerequisite: 301 and 302.

415. French Culture (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

This course examines various aspects of French culture. Prerequisite: 301 and 302 and (310 or 315).

432. Topics in Literature and Culture (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

(Also offered as COMP, ENGL 432) Varying topics in the practice and theory of literatures and cultures.

465. Topics in French Film (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in French film.

485. Advanced Seminar in French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics will deal with specific aspects of French literature, culture, and/or language. Course taught in French. Prerequisite: 301 and 302 and (310 or 315).

497. Undergraduate Problems (1-6 to a maximum of 6 Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

498. Reading and Research for Honors (3)

Open to juniors and seniors approved by the Honors Committee.

499. Honors Essay (3)

Open only to seniors enrolled for departmental honors.

500. Teaching Practicum (1-3)

Required of all new teaching assistants in French; others by permission of instructor.

502. Topics in Medieval French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Study of topics in medieval French literature and culture.

508. Reading French for Graduate Students I (3)

This is the first of a two-course series for graduate students who need to acquire a reading knowledge of French.

512. Topics in Sixteenth Century French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in 16th-century French studies.

522. Topics in Seventeenth Century French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in Seventeenth Century French studies.

524. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century French Literature (3)



532. Topics in Eighteenth Century French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in 18th-century French studies.

542. Topics in Nineteenth Century French (3-9 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in 19th-century French studies.

552. Topics in Twentieth Century French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in 20th-century French studies.

570. Seminar in French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)



575. Graduate Problems (1-6, no limit Δ)

Restriction: permission of instructor.

580. Topics in Cultural Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in cultural studies.

582. Topics in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in cultural studies.

584. Special Topics in Women Writers (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in cultural studies.

585. Graduate Seminars in French Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Each section in this course will focus on a different topic. Titles of individual sections will vary as content varies.

588. Topics in Genre Studies (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Interdisciplinary study of a specific literary genre.

599. Master's Thesis (1-6, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

600. Topics in One Author's Oeuvre (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

An in-depth study of one author’s oeuvre.

611. Topics in Theory (3 to a maximum of 9 Δ)

Topics in literary and cultural studies.

699. Dissertation (3-12, no limit Δ)

Offered on a CR/NC basis only.




First Year Experience (FYEX)


1010 [UNIV 103]. Foundational Math (3)

This course is designed to prepare students for college-level mathematics courses by strengthening key mathematical concepts. It addresses the transition from high school to college and incorporates strategies needed for problem solving.

1020 [UNIV 104]. Math Learning Strategies (1-3, may be repeated once Δ)

This course is designed to help increase awareness of math-based structures in day-to-day life, interpret and evaluate information presented in graphical and visual formats, and use problem-solving tools and concepts to analyze information and arguments. 

1030 [UNIV 106]. Critical Text Analysis (1-3)

This course presents the reading process including study reading, critical thinking and analysis. It addresses the transition from high school to college and incorporates strategies needed for problem solving.

1110 [UNIV 101]. First-Year Seminar [Seminar: Introduction to UNM and Higher Education] (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ [1-3])

Designed to accelerate successful transition to the academic environment at a research university.




Geography (GEOG)


1150 [195]. Introduction to Environmental Studies (3)

Survey of environmental issues related to the degradation of land, air and water resources.

1160 [101]. Home Planet: Land, Water and Life (3)

This course introduces the physical elements of world geography through the study of climate and weather, vegetation, soils, plate tectonics, and the various types of landforms as well as the environmental cycles and the distributions of these components and their significance to humans. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science.

1160L [105L]. Home Planet Laboratory [Home Planet: Land, Water and Life Laboratory] (1)

Exercises designed to complement 1160. Applied problems in the spatial processes of the physical environment. Map construction and reading, weather and climatic analysis, classification of vegetative and soil associations, landform distribution analysis. Two hours lab. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area III: Science. Pre- or corequisite: 1160.

1165 [102]. People and Place (3)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of human geography. Human geography examines the dynamic and often complex relationships that exist between people as members of particular cultural groups and the geographical "spaces" and "places" in which they exist over time and in the world today. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area IV: Social/Behavioral Sciences.

1175 [140]. World Regions [Introduction to World Regions] (3)

Overview of the physical geography, natural resources, cultural landscapes, and current problems of the world’s major regions. Students will also examine current events at a variety of geographic scales.

181. Introduction to Maps and Geospatial Information (3)

Maps are tools for communication. Will explore scale; projections; symbolization; generalization; alternative or non-tradition map representations provided by GIS, remote sensing, multimedia and animated maps.

181L. Geospatial Field Methods (1)

Students gain field and laboratory experience in geographic data collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation. Topics include map reading, spatial sampling and statistics, the global position system (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and cartography.

1970 [180]. World of Beer [The World of Beer] (3)

This course examines and the complex and fascinating world of beer. It examines social and ecological influences on its development and explores the functions of beer from historical, economic, cultural, environmental and physical viewpoints.

217. Energy, Environment and Society (3)

(Also offered as ME 217) A look at the social, ethical, and environmental impacts of energy use both now and through history. A survey of renewable energy and conservation and their impact on environmental and social systems.

251. Meteorology (3)

(Also offered as EPS 251) Description of weather phenomena, principles of atmospheric motion, weather map analysis and weather prediction.

254. Introduction to Latin American Society I: Social Sciences (3)

(Also offered as POLS 254, SOC 354) Introduction to Latin American Studies through the social sciences examines major themes including colonialism, agrarian transformation, urbanization, demographics, family, human rights, inequalities, violence, and social movements. Emphasis given to insights gained from making interdisciplinary connections.

340. Latin American Culture and Society (3)

(Also offered as LTAM 360; POLS 360) This course serves as an introduction to the cultures and societies of Latin America from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course surveys the region using materials drawn from both the humanities and social sciences.

350. Field Methods in Geography [Natural Environments] (3)

Field-based learning experiences focused on the collection and analysis of natural phenomena. Methods for recording and analyzing climate, vegetation, biodiversity, and disturbance patterns are explored through field and laboratory experiences in the Albuquerque region.  Prerequisite: 1160 and 1160L.

352. Global Climate Change (3)

(Also offered as EPS 352) Comparison of natural and anthropogenic causes of large-scale climate change. Factors influencing development of mitigation of adaptation policies. Prerequisite: MATH 1220 or MATH 1230 or MATH 1240 or MATH 1250 or MATH 1512.

**360. Land Use Management (3)

Exercise of legal and political power over land and other resources. Resolution of conflicts between competing land users.

364. Law, Place and Space (3)

This class examines the relationships between law and geography, interrogating how law shapes the human experience of place, and the ways that a variety of spatial categories inform the law.

365. Nature and Society (3)

This course explores the human dimensions of geographical challenges through the traditions, actions and social organization of contemporary western and global/international human systems.

380L. Basic Statistics for Geographers (3)

Introduces fundamental statistical and quantitative modeling techniques widely used in geography. Emphasizes geographic examples and spatial problems. Includes a lab component that covers the use of statistical software in geographic analysis. Fee required.

**381L. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4)

The study of spatial data, spatial processes and an introduction to the computer tools necessary to analyze spatial representations of the real world. Exercises in data acquisition, preprocessing, map analysis and map output. Fees required. Three hours lecture, 2 hours lab.

390. Qualitative Methods for Geographers (3)

This course introduces fundamental qualitative methods and research design widely used in geography. Emphasizes geographic examples and spatial problems through the completion of an independent research project on a geography topic.

427 / 527. Introductory Programming for GIS (3)

This course is intended to provide GIS software users with an introduction to Python, the de facto programming language of the GIS community. Prerequisite: **381L.

428 / 528. Advanced Programming for GIS (3)

This course is intended to provide advanced GIS software programing experience, with an emphasis on the creation of standalone, distributable programs in Python, the de facto programming language of the GIS community. Prerequisite: 427.

*445. Geography of New Mexico and the Southwest (3)

This course introduces the geography of the Southwest, focusing on New Mexico. Students will conduct independent research in conjunction with a multi-day field trip.

*446. Exploring Oaxaca Through Food and Craft (3)

Field course focusing on food and craft production as related to geography, sustainability, and development in indigenous communities in Oaxaca, Mexico. Topics include indigenous culture, food systems, globalization, heritage and tourism, economics and material culture.

*450. Hazards and Disasters [Environmental Hazards] (3)

This seminar explores how power and space together shape contemporary sociocultural, political, and ecological worlds. Focal topics and theoretical approaches will vary each semester. 

461 / 561. Environmental Management (3)

Examination of critical issues of environmental degradation in global and local system related to: air and water pollution, soil erosion, deforestation, strip mining, over dependence on fossil fuels and improper management of toxic and other wastes. Appraisal of the conservation methods and policies applied to these issues and the outlook for the future.

462 / 562. Water Governance [Water Resources Management] (3)

In this class, we view political considerations as inherent in water management and unavoidable. This focus on politics before technical water resource manipulation is what we call water governance, compared to traditional "water resource management". 

463 / 563. Public Land Management (3)

Defining