Undergraduate Program

Director of Undergraduate Programs
Tariq A. Khraishi

Introduction

In order to meet the challenge of today’s rapidly changing technologies, mechanical engineering students are well-grounded in the basic principles of analysis, design, experimentation and computer utilization. A range of technical electives enables students to develop and specialize in their fields of interest. After graduation, mechanical engineers conceive, plan and design a wide variety of devices, machines and systems for energy conversion and utilization, automation and robotics, environmental control, material processing and handling, manufacturing and CAD/CAM, dynamical systems, fluid flow and other purposes. They are active in creative design, applied research and development and management.


Degree Offered

  • Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.)
    Concentration: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Programs

Students in the B.S.M.E. program may seek admission to the Master of Science (M.S.) in Mechanical Engineering or in the Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.M.E.) under the Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Program. See the "Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Programs" header on this page.


Program Goals

The principal goal of the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.) program is to provide students with the fundamentals of mechanical engineering so that they have a solid base for an engineering career. This includes building a sufficient knowledge base, exercising creative and analytical capability, and developing communication skills so that the graduates can continue to expand their learning as their fields of interest and the scope of mechanical engineering evolve. Our core courses are intended to provide a broad base so that those who terminate their formal education with the B.S.M.E. degree can continue to grow intellectually. Likewise, the base provides insight into fields that students may choose to study at the graduate level.

This goal is met by a curriculum in which fundamental knowledge of earlier years is applied in later engineering courses. Specifically, the goals for the B.S.M.E. program at the University of New Mexico are closely linked to the criteria set forth by ABET. The following statement has been adopted by the Mechanical Engineering Faculty to represent our educational goals.

Outcomes

The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University provides students with a quality mechanical engineering education. Each Mechanical Engineering student will demonstrate the following by the time of graduation:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data;
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints, such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;
  • an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
  • an ability to communicate effectively;
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
  • a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning;
  • knowledge of contemporary issues;
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Objectives

The Department of Mechanical Engineering has the following objectives:

  • Graduates will have the educational background necessary to complete successfully in a global workplace.
  • Qualified graduates will pursue advanced study if desired.
  • Graduates will pursue leadership positions in their profession and/or communities.

Cooperative Education and Internships

To complement their formal course work with practical experience, mechanical engineering students may elect a cooperative education program in which they are employed full time by an industrial or governmental agency for a part of the year. They are full-time students for the remaining part of the year. Students who need financial aid or who wish to gain engineering experience will find this program attractive. The Department of Mechanical Engineering does not offer technical elective credit for cooperative education.

Many Mechanical Engineering undergraduate students participate in paid or unpaid internships. While a co-op program is full-time, an internship is typically part-time, especially in the Fall or Spring semesters. In the summer, internships can be full-time. As in co-ops, internships are a great way to link practice to the curriculum, to network and build a resume for future employment, and to possibly generate more revenue for a student.


Accreditation

The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Advisement

Pre-major engineering students who have indicated Mechanical Engineering as their intended major are advised by the department Undergraduate Advisor as needed. Upon admission to the program (until graduation), each student is assigned to one of the faculty members for advisement. Students in the program are required to seek advisement from their designated advisor each semester during the pre-registration period. The purpose of this session is to help the student with any problems he/she may have in his/her program of studies. Students will have an advisement hold and not be allowed to register until they have consulted with their advisor.

Minimum Grades ("No C- or below" Rule)

For students admitted to the B.S.M.E. program in Fall 2016 and beyond, the minimum acceptable grade for all courses applicable towards the B.S.M.E. is "C".

Planning for Graduate Studies

The Mechanical Engineering Department offers programs of study towards the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. Consult the Mechanical Engineering: Graduate Program section of this Catalog and contact the departmental Graduate Advisor for detailed information.

Senior students with a GPA of 3.0 or greater who are within 10 credit hours of completing the B.S.M.E. may obtain graduate credit (in graduate courses) for a maximum of nine (9) credit hours, provided they meet the requirements specified in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog.

The B.S.M.E. has proven to be excellent preparation for graduate engineering programs as well as for other professional programs such as law, business administration, medicine and dentistry.


Admission

Students must be admitted for study at the University of New Mexico and must have completed approximately one year of the freshman year subjects before applications are processed for admission to the Baccalaureate Program in Mechanical Engineering. Approval from the Mechanical Engineering Department is required. Applicants must consult the appropriate departmental advisor for evaluation of academic work before admission can be completed.

At least 18 credit hours of freshman-year technical subjects are required by the School of Engineering for admission into degree programs. For the Mechanical Engineering degree program, these courses must include the following 14 credit hours: MATH 162 Calculus I (4); MATH 163 Calculus II (4); ME 160L Mechanical Engineering Design I (3); PHYC 160 General Physics (3). Four other credit hours may be taken from: CHEM 121 General Chemistry I (3); CHEM 123L General Chemistry I Laboratory (1); CS 151L Computer Programming Fundamentals for Non-Majors (3); PHYC 160L General Physics Laboratory (1). Note that, as of Fall 2015, all of these listed courses are required as part of the B.S.M.E. curriculum. A minimum GPA of 2.75 in these technical courses is required for admission to undergraduate study in Mechanical Engineering.

A cumulative GPA of at least 2.20 (in technical plus non-technical courses) is also required for admission to the program. All applicants must have completed ENGL 110 or its equivalent before admission. As of Fall 2016, all courses required in the B.S.M.E. program must have grades of "C" or better for satisfying both admission and graduation requirements. The same applies to required Core Curriculum courses. 

Students transferring to the undergraduate program (from any institution, including UNM) must also meet the GPA and admission course requirements stated above.

Starting in Fall 2016 and for admission into the program, any course required for the B.S.M.E. cannot have been attempted more than three times. An attempt includes receiving any letter grade ("A" through "F"), WP, WF, W, WNC, CR, NC, I or AUDIT. For the purposes of this requirement, coursework taken at other institutions is treated the same as coursework at UNM.


Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Credit hours required for graduation: 125

Requirements:

Credit
Hours
Year 1 First Semester
CHEM 121 General Chemistry I 3  
CHEM 123L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1  
ENGL 110 Accelerated Composition  3  
ME 160L Mechanical Engineering Design I 3  
MATH 162 Calculus I 4  
  Core Fine Arts Elective 3  
    17    
  Second Semester    
CS 151L Computer Programming Fundamentals for Non-Majors 3
ENGL 120 Composition III 3  
MATH 163 Calculus II 4
PHYC 160 General Physics 3  
PHYC 160L General Physics Laboratory 1
Core Humanities Elective 3  
    17  
Year 2 First Semester    
CE 202 Engineering Statics 3 (3-0)
MATH 264 Calculus III 4 (4-0)
ME 217 Energy, Environment and Society 3 (3-0)
ME 260L Mechanical Engineering Design II 3 (2-3)
PHYC 161 General Physics 3 (3-0)
    16 (15-3) 
  Second Semester    
ECE 203 Circuit Analysis I 3 (3-0)
MATH **316 Applied Ordinary Differential Equations 3 (3-0)
ME 306 Dynamics 3 (3-0)
ME 318L Mechanical Engineering Laboratory 4 (3-3)
  Core Writing and Speaking Elective 3  
    16 (15-3)
Year 3 First Semester    
CE 302 Mechanics of Materials 3 (3-0)
ME 301 Thermodynamics 3 (3-0)
ME **317L Fluid Mechanics 4 (3-3)
  Mathematics Elective (3) 3 (3-0)
Core Humanities Elective 3 (3-0)
    16 (15-3)
  Second Semester    
ECON 105 Introductory Macroeconomics 3 (3-0)
ME 352L Materials Laboratory 1 (0-3)
ME 357 Introduction to Mechanical Vibrations 3 (3-0)
ME 360L Mechanical Engineering Design III 3 (2-3)
ME 370L Engineering Materials Science 4 (3-3)
   Core Second Language Elective 3 (3-0)
    17 (14-9)
Year 4 First Semester    
ME **320L Heat Transfer 4 (3-3)
ME **380 Analysis and Design of Mechanical Control Systems 3 (3-0)
ME 459 Mechanical Engineering Design IV 3 (3-0)
  Mechanical Engineering Elective (1) 3 (3-0)
    13 (12-3)
  Second Semester    
ME 460 Mechanical Engineering Design V 4 (3-3)
    Mechanical Engineering Elective (1) 3 (3-0)
   Mechanical Engineering Elective (1) 3 (3-0)
Technical Elective (2) 3 (3-0)
    13 (12-3)


Formula Society of Automotive Engineers Option

Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (FSAE) is a program in which the students design, build, and test a racing car. Students wishing to pursue the Formula SAE option, substitute the following curriculum for the second semester of their junior year and both semesters of their senior year. All three FSAE courses must be completed for this option.

Credit
Hours
Year 3 Second Semester   
ECON 105 Introductory Macroeconomics 3 (3-0)
ME 357 Introduction to Mechanical Vibrations 3 (3-0)
ME 360L Mechanical Engineering Design III 3 (2-3)
ME 370L Engineering Materials Science 4 (3-3)
ME 406L Formula SAE Racecar Design 4 (3-3)
    17 (14-9)
Year 4 First Semester    
ME **320L Heat Transfer 4 (3-3)
ME **380 Analysis and Design of Mechanical Control Systems      3 (3-0)
ME 407 Formula SAE Racecar Fabrication Lab 3 (3-0)
ME 459 Mechanical Engineering Design IV 3 (3-0)
13 (12-3)
  Second Semester    
ME 408 Formula SAE Racecar Test Lab 3 (3-0)
  Mechanical Engineering Elective (1) 3 (3-0)
Technical Elective (2) 3 (3-0)
  Core Second Language Elective 3 (3-0)
    12 (12-0)


(1)
Mechanical Engineering Electives
include all Mechanical Engineering elective courses 300-level and above.
(2) Technical Electives may be selected from Mechanical Engineering Electives or from approved upper-division (300-level and above) courses from Mathematics/Statistics, Chemistry, Physics, Computer Science, and Engineering. Technical Electives may not be taken on the CR/NC grading option.
(3) Mathematics Elective course must be selected from MATH 311, **312, **313, **314, **321; or STAT **345.

For further information contact:
Undergraduate Coordinator
Mechanical Engineering, Room 204
MSC01 1150
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131
(505) 277-1325


Concentration in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

Requirements

Stage 1
Choose at least 2:
ENG 116   Introduction to Engineering   
ME 318L Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
ME 370L
-and-
ME 352L
Engineering Materials Science

Materials Laboratory
Stage 2
Choose at least 2:
CBE 499 Sel T: Nanocharacterization of Materials
ECE 474L Microelectronics Processing
ECE 495 ST: Introduction to Nano-Biosensors
ME 419 Theory, Fabrication, and Characterization of Nano and Microelectromechanical Systems (NEMS-MEMS)
ME 451-452 Undergraduate Problems
ME 461-462 ST: Nanomechanics
or other Nanoscience and Nanotechnology-focused courses, as approved by the undergraduate program Director.

Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Programs

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering to Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

The School of Engineering offers a Shared-Credit Degrees Program designed to allow students to complete B.S.M.E. and the Master of Science (M.S.) in Mechanical Engineering in five years (depending on the student's mathematics preparation upon entering UNM as a first-year undergraduate student). To accomplish this, some courses are counted towards both the Bachelor's and Master's degrees.

The Mechanical Engineering department allows up to 12 credit hours of undergraduate electives to be replaced by 500-level graduate courses that count towards both degrees.

Eligibility: Students may apply to the Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Program during their undergraduate junior year, after completing 75 credit hours applicable to the B.S.M.E. degree. At least 64 credit hours need to be mathematics, science, and engineering courses (CE, CHEM, CS, ECE, MATH, ME, PHYC, STAT) applicable to the B.S.M.E. degree. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.50 is normally required, counting only the completed courses applicable to B.S.M.E. at the time of application.

The application deadline is November 30 in the Fall semester and April 30 in the Spring semester. The departmental decision will be made by the beginning of the following semester. Admission to the graduate portion of this program is provisional and is not finalized until the student satisfactorily completes the requirements for the B.S.M.E. degree.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering to Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering

Students in the B.S.M.E. program may seek admission to the Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.M.E.) under the Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Program. Interested students should contact the Director of the Manufacturing Engineering program. See the School of Engineering section of this Catalog.


Departmental Honors

Students with a Mechanical Engineering major GPA average of at least 3.50 are encouraged to enroll in the Honors Program. Undergraduate students may graduate with General Honors or with Department Honors or both. Information is available from department advisors and from the University Honors Center.


Courses

ME 150. Introduction to Modern Mechanical Engineering. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ME 160L. Mechanical Engineering Design I. (3)



ME 217. Energy, Environment and Society. (3)



ME 260L. Mechanical Engineering Design II. (3)



ME 301. Thermodynamics. (3)



ME **302. Applied Thermodynamics. (3)



ME 306. Dynamics. (3)



ME **317L. Fluid Mechanics. (4)



ME 318L. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. (4)



ME **320L. Heat Transfer. (4)



ME 350. Engineering Economy. (3)



ME 352L. Materials Laboratory. (1)



ME 353L. Fluid Mechanics Lab. (1)



ME 354L. Heat Transfer Laboratory. (1)



ME 357. Introduction to Mechanical Vibrations. (3)



ME 360L. Mechanical Engineering Design III. (3)



ME **365. Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems. (3)



ME 370L. Engineering Materials Science. (4)



ME **380. Analysis and Design of Mechanical Control Systems. (3)



ME 400 / 500. Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering. (3)



ME 401 / 501. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. (3)



ME 404 / 504. Computational Mechanics. (3)



ME 405 / 505. High Performance Engines. (3)



ME 406L. Formula SAE Racecar Design. (4)



ME 407. Formula SAE Racecar Fabrication Lab. (3)



ME 408. Formula SAE Racecar Test Lab. (3)



ME 416 / 516. Applied Dynamics. (3)



ME 419 / 519. Theory, Fabrication, and Characterization of Nano and Microelectromechanical Systems (NEMS/MEMS). (4)



ME 429 / 529. Gas Dynamics. (3)



ME 436 / 536. Rotor Aerodynamics. (3)



ME 451-452. Undergraduate Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ, 1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ME 455. Engineering Project Management. (3)



ME 459. Mechanical Engineering Design IV. (3)



ME 460. Mechanical Engineering Design V. (4)



ME 461-462 / 561-562. Special Topics. (1-4, no limit Δ, 1-4, no limit Δ)



ME 463. Undergraduate Honors Thesis. (3)



ME 471 / 571. Advanced Materials Science. (3)



ME 480 / 580. Dynamic System Analysis. (3)



ME 481 / 581. Digital Control of Mechanical Systems. (3)



ME 482 / 582. Robot Engineering. (3)



ME 486 / 586. Design for Manufacturability. (3)



ME 500 / 400. Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering. (3)



ME 501 / 401. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. (3)



ME 504 / 404. Computational Mechanics. (3)



ME 505 / 405. High Performance Engines. (3)



ME 512. Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. (3)



ME 516 / 416. Applied Dynamics. (3)



ME 519 / 419. Theory, Fabrication, and Characterization of Nano and Microelectromechanical Systems (NEMS/MEMS). (4)



ME 520. Advanced Thermodynamics I. (3)



ME 521. Thermal System Design and Optimization. (3)



ME 529 / 429. Gas Dynamics. (3)



ME 530. Theoretical Fluid Mechanics I. (3)



ME 534. Boundary Layers. (3)



ME 536 / 436. Rotor Aerodynamics. (3)



ME 540. Elasticity. (3)



ME 542. Deformation Analysis and Modeling. (3)



ME 551-552. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ, 1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ME 556. Entrepreneurial Engineering. (3)



ME 559. Design Project. (3)



ME 561-562 / 461-462. Special Topics. (1-4, no limit Δ, 1-4, no limit Δ)



ME 571 / 471. Advanced Materials Science. (3)



ME 580 / 480. Dynamic System Analysis. (3)



ME 581 / 481. Digital Control of Mechanical Systems. (3)



ME 582 / 482. Robot Engineering II. (3)



ME 586 / 486. Design for Manufacturability. (3)



ME 591-592. Seminar. (0-1, no limit Δ, 0-1, no limit Δ)



ME 594. Introduction to Space Situational Awareness. (3)



ME 595. Orbital Mechanics. (3)



ME 596. Spacecraft Attitude Dynamics and Control. (3)



ME 597. Small Spacecraft Design I. (3)



ME 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



ME 634. Turbulent Flows. (3)



ME 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



Course Search:




Keyword Search:

Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809