Graduate Program

Director of Graduate Studies
Justine Andrews, Ph.D.

Application Deadlines
Fall Admission: January 15
Spring Admission: November 15*

* Spring admissions are only allowed for those who completed the M.A. in Art History program in the fall and are accepted into the Ph.D. program.


Degrees Offered

  • Master of Arts in Art Education (M.A.)
  • Master of Arts in Art History (M.A.)
    Concentrations: Art History; Arts of the Americas.
  • Master of Fine Arts in Art Studio (M.F.A.)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Art History (Ph.D.)
    Concentrations: 19th and 20th Century Western Art History; Art of Colonial America–Art of the United States; Built Environment; History of Architecture; History of the Graphic Arts; History of Photography; Modern Latin America/Latino Art History; Native American Art History; Pre-Columbian Art History; Spanish Colonial Art History.

The Department offers degrees in three fields: art studio, art history, and art education. The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree in Art Studio student can focus on painting and drawing, photography, printmaking, art and ecology, electronic arts, or 3D. Students interested in art history can pursue the Master of Arts (M.A.) and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with a concentration in either the Arts of the Americas or the Arts of the Modern World. The M.A. in Art Education program is oriented toward the development of a professional who has an understanding of the core profession of art education as a humanistic discipline, and to developing specialization in a particular area of personal interest related to art education. 

All students admitted to the graduate studio program are given studio space on campus. Admission is selective and limited by the number of studio spaces available. All photography graduate students are given both darkroom and individual studio spaces.

NOTE: The art studio printmaking program and the art history programs in Arts of the Modern World and Arts of the Americas (both M.A. and Ph.D.) are recognized by the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education (WICHE) for inclusion in their Out-of-State Programs at In-State Tuition. Qualified residents of the 15 participating states in the Commission may enroll at reduced tuition rates in these three programs.

The general requirements of the University for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are given in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog. The requirements for the M.F.A. are given within this departmental text.

Financial Assistance

The Department has a limited number of graduate and teaching assistantships to offer graduate students. These are generally available after the first year in the graduate program. Assistantships are dependent upon departmental need. The appointments are usually .25 FTE and made on a semester to semester basis. Students must be enrolled for at least 6 graduate credit hours during this appointment.


Admission to the Art History Programs

Applicants for admission to the M.A. program should preferably have an undergraduate major in the history of art with a minimum of 24 credit hours (or the equivalent as approved by the admitting faculty) as well as advanced courses in history, literature, and philosophy. Any deficiencies in this required preparation must be removed during the first year of coursework for the degree. Graduate credit is not be given for courses taken to remove a deficiency, but graduate courses may be taken concurrently. Prospective students should note that candidates for the M.A. degree are required to demonstrate a general knowledge of the history of art.

In preparing an application for admission to the doctoral program, the potential candidate is urged to state aims clearly and to specify the field of art history to be investigated. A candidate is not accepted unless these aims fall within the scope of the University’s program and unless the Department believes these aims can be realized. Field work and travel are inevitably be necessary in support of research at the doctoral level.

Applicants for admission to the Ph.D. program should have an M.A. in Art History or, in exceptional circumstances as approved by the admitting faculty, in such cognate disciplines as History, Anthropology, Archaeology, or American Studies. Those admitted to the Ph.D. program without an M.A. in Art History may be required to take additional graduate courses beyond the minimum Ph.D. requirement of 48 credit hours of coursework; in all cases they must take and pass the M.A. comprehensive examination.

As part of the application for admission to graduate study, the student must submit materials as follows:

1.  Application for Admission, Registration Information and application fee.
2.  Two sets of official transcripts from all institutions previously attended.
3.  Three Letters of Recommendation.
4.  Statement of Intent. A clearly written statement of intent describing in detail reasons for wishing admission. In evaluating this written statement, both its form and content are carefully considered. This statement, no more than three pages in length (typewritten), should include the following:

  • the proposed field of concentration;
  • a self-evaluation of current work;
  • an account of any special experiences which might indicate a background in art more extensive than most students with a B.A. degree;
  • a statement of goals while attending and after completing graduate study;
  • reasons for choosing the University of New Mexico as a place for graduate study.

5.  Writing Sample. A recent example of creative scholarship in the form of an academic paper or article must be submitted for evaluation. This material is not returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

All items mentioned above should be mailed directly to the Graduate Office, Department of Art, MSC04 2560, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001.


Master of Arts in Art History

The M.A. degree in Art History is only offered under Plan I (requiring thesis). Plan I requirements are:

  1. A minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework
  2. A minimum of 6 credit hours of 500-level coursework
  3. A maximum of 6 credit hours of topics (529) courses
  4. Six hours of Thesis (599) credit
  5. Completion of a master's thesis

The M.A. degree in Art History is offered in two concentrations. Each has its own specific requirements and course distribution. Each student must select either:

  • Concentration in Art History
  • Concentration in Arts of the Americas

Concentration in Art History

Requirements

Credit
Hours
ARTH 500 Philosophy and Methods of Art History 3
ARTH graduate courses in Pre Modern emphasis (pre 1400CE) 6
ARTH graduate courses in Early Modern emphasis (c. 1400-1750CE) 6
ARTH graduate courses in Modern and Contemporary emphasis (c. 1750-the present) 9
ARTH 599 Master's Thesis 6
  Total 30


All work offered toward degree requirements must fall within a five-year period. Transfer credit hours must fall within the Graduate Studies-mandated seven-year period.

There is, of course, some overlap between many of these areas of emphasis. In each case, the nature of these concerns vary owing to the predominant body of monuments being analyzed and the specific media whereby these artworks are produced. For example, the African American Art course, while placed in the Modern and Contemporary category, can also encompass all three chronological areas of emphasis. Courses that cover more than one emphasis can potentially be used flexibly in the Program of Studies, however one class cannot be used to simultaneously fulfill two emphases requirements. Contact the committee chair and the graduate advisor for more information.

Art History Emphases

While ARTH 551 and 552 (Graduate Problems courses) are available, M.A. students are limited to one 3 credit hour Graduate Problems course, as approved by her or his Committee on Studies. A student may also petition his or her Committee on Studies to approve a substitute course from another department, if it is closely related to the student’s specific concentration or emphasis. Courses marked with an asterisk are available for graduate credit.

  • Pre-Modern
    511 Pre-Columbian Art: Mesoamerica
    512 Pre-Columbian Art: South America
    529 T: Art History
    532 Islamic Art and Architecture
    549 Art of Spain
    560 Seminar in Pre-Columbian Art
    567 World Architecture I: History of the Built Environment From Prehistory to 1800 CE
  • Early Modern
    *330 Renaissance Art and Architecture
    502 Native American Art I
    506 Native American Art II
    516 Southwestern Native Ceramics
    520 History of Prints I
    529 T: Art History
    550 Ibero-American Colonial Arts and Architecture
    572 American Art: 1675-1875
    580 Seminar in Spanish Colonial Art
    592 American Landscapes
  • Modern and Contemporary
    515 Modern and Contemporary Native American Art
    517 Seminar in Souvenir Native American Arts
    521 History of Prints II
    522 Contemporary Architecture
    525 19th-Century Photography
    526 20th-Century Photography
    527 Contemporary Photography
    529 T: Art History
    553 African American Art
    579 American Art: 1876-1940
    582 Seminar in 20th-Century Art
    583 Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art History
    588 The Arts of Mexico, 1810-1945
    590 Muralism in the Americas- 19th and 20th Centuries and Beyond
    591 Late 20th-Century to 21st-Century Art
    592 American Landscapes
    594 Art of Latin America 1945-Present
    595 European Art 1830-1900

Concentration in Arts of the Americas

Requirements

Credit
Hours
ARTH 500 Philosophy and Methods of Art History 3
ARTH graduate courses in primary emphasis 9
ARTH graduate courses in secondary emphasis 9
ARTH graduate course in another (third) emphasis 3
ARTH 599 Master's Thesis 6
Total 30


All work offered toward degree requirements must fall within a five-year period. Transfer credit hours must fall within the Graduate Studies mandated seven-year period.

Each student must select a primary and secondary emphasis in either:

  1. Native North American Art History
  2. Art and Architecture of the Ancient Americas
  3. Ibero-American Colonial Art History
  4. Modern U.S. and Canadian Art History
  5. Modern Latin American Art History

There is, of course, some overlap between many of these areas of emphasis. In each case, the nature of these concerns vary owing to the predominant body of monuments being analyzed and the specific media whereby these artworks are produced. Part of Native American Art, while placed in category A, is then also considered Modern U.S. and Canadian or Latin American Art History. Courses that cover more than one emphasis can potentially be used flexibly in the Program of Studies, however one class cannot be used to simultaneously fulfill two requirements. Contact the committee chair and the graduate advisor for more information. 

Art of the Americas Emphases

While Art History 551 and 552 (Graduate Problems course) are available, M.A. students are limited to one 3 credit hour Graduate Problems course, as approved by her or his Committee on Studies. A student may also petition his or her Committee on Studies to approve a substitute course from another department, if it is closely related to the student’s specific concentration or emphasis. Courses marked with an asterisk are available for graduate credit.

  • Native American Art History
    502 Native American Art I
    506 Native American Art II
    515 Modern and Contemporary Native American Art
    516 Southwestern Native Ceramics
    517 Seminar in Souvenir Native American Arts
    529 T: Native American Art
    559 Seminar in Native American Art
  • Art and Architecture of the Ancient Americas
    511 Pre-Columbian Art: Mesoamerica
    512 Pre-Columbian Art: South America
    529 T: Pre-Columbian Art
    560 Seminar in Pre-Columbian Art
  • Ibero-American Colonial Art History
    *330 Renaissance Art and Architecture
    529 T: Spanish Colonial Art
    549 Art of Spain
    550 Ibero-American Colonial Arts and Architecture
    580 Seminar in Spanish Colonial Art
  • Modern U.S. and Canadian Art History
    525 19th-Century Photography
    526 20th-Century Photography
    527 Contemporary Photography
    529 T: Modern Art of America and/or Europe
    553 African American Art
    579 American Art 1876-1940
    582 Seminar in 20th-Century Art
    590 Muralism in the Americas- 19th and 20th Centuries and Beyond
    591 Late 20th-Century to 21st-Century Art
    592 American Landscapes
  • Modern Latin-American Art
    529 T: Modern Latin-American Art
    583 Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Latin American Art History
    588 The Arts of Mexico, 1810-1945
    590 Muralism in the Americas- 19th and 20th Centuries and Beyond
    594 Art of Latin America 1945-Present

Committee on Studies

A student forms a Committee on Studies during the semester in which 12 graduate credit hours are completed. This three-member committee is formed in consultation with the proposed chairperson of the Committee and the Department Director of Graduate Studies and with the approval of the Department Chairperson. Changes in membership are also made in this manner.

Filing Program of Studies

Students must file the Program of Studies form soon after completing 12 graduate credit hours. Before a student may file their Program of Studies and commencement of the thesis, a student must:

  1. Successfully complete ARTH 500 (Philosophy and Methods of Art History) during the first year of residence.
  2. Successful participate in the Spring Symposium. The student presents a satisfactory 20-minute formal paper or research work in progress to peers and faculty during the 12th week of the second semester (Spring semester) in the program.
  3. Provide evidence of proficiency in at least one foreign language appropriate to the student's area of concentration (see Department Graduate Advisor for methods of fulfilling this requirement).

Approval of the Program of Studies is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies only after the residency requirement is met and the Program of Studies has been approved by the Committee on Studies and the Department Director of Graduate Studies.

Approval of the Program of Studies in no way implies successful completion of the M.A. degree. The Program of Studies must be submitted to the Dean of Graduate Studies for approval by October 1st of the semester before the student intends to graduate at the latest.

Comprehensive Examination in Art History

Students must pass a written comprehensive examination covering the major areas of the history of art. The M.A. candidate should take this Comprehensive Examination, scheduled early in every Fall and Spring semester, in the semester after which 12 credit hours of coursework has been completed.

M.A. Thesis and Defense

The thesis is an extended research paper that demonstrates a candidate’s ability to perform research and analysis at the graduate level. The student defends the thesis in an oral examination administered by the Committee on Studies.

The student must notify Graduate Studies at least two weeks before the date of the thesis defense on the forms available. Results of the defense are recorded on the reverse side of the final examination announcement form. The student is responsible for initiating the procedure and making sure that the original notice is sent to Graduate Studies.

Time Limit to Complete Requirements

All work offered towards the M.A. degree must be accomplished within a five-year period from the time of admission, including transfer work from another institution.


Master of Fine Arts in Art Studio

The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) is the terminal degree in art studio. It is designed to afford the student an opportunity to amplify his or her abilities as a professional artist. As such it provides the opportunity for the individual to focus on the creative aspects of their work. The M.F.A. usually requires at least three years of intensive study and research beyond the bachelor’s degree. Although the formal requirements for the M.F.A. are in some respects comparable to doctoral degrees in other fields, the scope and objectives of the M.F.A. degree are uniquely different. As such, the M.F.A. degree represents strong creative achievement in studio art, an assured grasp of an area of focus, a sound knowledge of critical and historical artistic thought about art, and demonstrated expertise in conceiving and executing a significant body of creative work. Thus, as with the doctoral degree, its achievement is no mere matter of meeting requirements.

It requires a dedication to the creative aspects of the studio work culminating in a dissertation that entails planning, installing, and documenting a solo exhibition of the student’s own creative work, producing a catalog, and giving an oral public presentation.

Coursework Requirements

The M.F.A. degree requires a minimum of 48 credit hours of coursework. Thirty-six of these credit hours must be completed at the University of New Mexico, of which at least 18, exclusive of dissertation hours, must be taken after admission to the M.F.A. program.

Transfer/Application of Credit

With the approval of the graduate unit, up to 12 credit hours of the coursework requirements for an M.F.A. may consist of a combination of the following: graduate-level credit taken at another accredited institution, application of credit in graduate-level courses earned while the student was in non-degree or undergraduate status or graduate-level University of New Mexico extension courses. These credit hours may be applied or transferred provided that:

  1. the coursework has not been counted toward a previous degree;
  2. grades of "B" or better were earned;
  3. the student has already completed at least 12 credit hours of graduate work in the M.F.A. program at the University;
  4. the application/transfer of these credit hours is approved by the Committee on Studies and the Department Director of Graduate Studies in the student’s Application for Candidacy;
  5. the application/transfer of these credit hours is approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Admission to the Studio Program

NOTE: Studio areas of focus are: painting and drawing, photography, printmaking, art and ecology, electronic arts, and 3D.

A prospective student in the graduate studio program must have completed an undergraduate degree including 42 credit hours in studio courses and 18 credit hours in art history. Any deficiencies in the required preparation must be removed during the first year of coursework for the degree. As part of the application for admission to graduate study, the student must submit materials as follows:

1.  Application for Admission, Registration Information and application fee.
2.  Two sets of official transcripts from all institutions previously attended, send directly to the Department.
3.  Three letters of recommendation.
4.  Statement of Intent. A clearly written statement of intent describing in detail reasons for wishing admission. This statement, no more than three pages in length (typewritten), should include the following:

  • information about the major and the proposed focus (painting and drawing, photography, printmaking, 3D);
  • a self-evaluation of current work;
  • an account of any special experiences which might indicate a background in art more extensive than most students with a B.A. or a B.F.A. degree;
  • a statement of goals while attending and after completing graduate study;
  • reasons for choosing the University of New Mexico as a place for graduate study. In evaluating this written statement, both its form and content is carefully considered.

5.  Portfolio. Applicants should submit work in a form that represents them best. This can include, but is not limited to, slides, original prints, CD-ROMs (specify Macintosh or PC), DVDs, and VHS. We take reasonable care but cannot be responsible for loss or damage. A combination of prints, slides (no more than 20), or other media is acceptable based on the uniqueness, size, or nature of your work. You may provide your work in any form that may be viewed directly on standard equipment (CD, DVD, VCR) but we take no responsibility for incompatibility or media failure. It is your responsibility to represent yourself well in this context; avoid complex presentations and excessive packaging. Also expected are:

  • an identifying list with information on the date, medium, and dimensions of each work.
  • a check or money order (no stamps) to provide sufficient funds for the return of the portfolio via U.S. Postal Service.

NOTE: For slide portfolios, fifteen to twenty 2" x 2" color slides must be sent in a standard 80-slide carousel tray. In addition to the information requested above, each slide must be labeled with the applicant’s name.

All items mentioned above should be sent to the Graduate Office, Department of Art, MSC04 2560, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001. Phone: (505) 277-6672.

Degree Requirements

Credit
Hours
ARTS 502 Interdisciplinary Seminar 3
ARTS graduate courses (in addition to 502) 21
ARTH graduate courses 6
Electives Six credit hours outside studio 18
Six credit hours outside the department
Six credit hours any area
ARTS 699 Dissertation (solo exhibition and catalog) 12
Total 60

 
Coursework

In their first fall semester of work, all students entering the M.F.A. program must enroll in Art Studio 502 Interdisciplinary Seminar.

Creative work is undertaken through graduate courses, topics courses, and one-on-one tutorial instruction.

Elective coursework is determined by the student’s particular needs and shall be undertaken only with the advice and approval of the Department Director of Graduate Studies and the student’s Committee on Studies. At least 18 credit hours exclusive of dissertation must be taken in courses numbered 500 or above completed at the University of New Mexico and no more than 24 credit hours exclusive of dissertation may be taken with a single professor.

Residence Requirement

The M.F.A. degree shall require at least 36 credit hours of coursework completed at the University of New Mexico, of which at least 18 credit hours must be taken after admission to the M.F.A. program (exclusive of dissertation credit hours).

Transfer Credit Hours 

A maximum of 12 credit hours of graduate work at another institution or from non-degree status at the University of New Mexico are transferable to the M.F.A. program. Courses taken as extension credit at other universities are not accepted for graduate credit at the University of New Mexico.

NOTE: Transfer of credit hours is not automatic with admission. The student’s Committee on Studies determines the number, if any, allowable for transfer. Transfer credit is limited to 12 credit hours. Aside from this limitation, all other conditions of transfer noted in the doctoral description in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog apply equally to the M.F.A.

Additional Requirements

  • All students are required to attend orientation and safety meetings before the start of the semester. Students are required to enroll in the Graduate Shop Foundations course offered every Fall semester.
  • Graduate Reviews. In each of the first two semesters, students participate in a review of their current and ongoing work. The review is open to faculty and students, and the public. These reviews are conducted by a four-member faculty committee.
  • Committee on Studies. Each student is assisted by the Department of Art Graduate Office in planning a program of studies until such time as they form their Committee on Studies. The formation of the Committee on Studies should take place before the end of the second semester of study.

Duties of a Committee on Studies

  • to conduct the M.F.A. Qualifying Review, which takes place at the beginning of the third semester.
  • to advise and assist the student in planning their program through the completion of degree requirements. This includes determining any transfer credit acceptable, the nature of elective courses and the approval of a specific dissertation program.
  • to conduct the Advancement to Candidacy/ Comprehensive Examination during the fifth semester of study.
  • to evaluate the exhibition work and dissertation or catalog/public presentation and submit M.F.A. Final Examination Reports.

Formation of Committee on Studies

The formation of the Committee on Studies is done in consultation with the Department Director of Graduate Studies and the approval of the Department Chairperson. The process begins with the student finding a qualified faculty member (all full-time, regular faculty are qualified), normally in the student's area of focus, who is willing to serve as Committee Chairperson. Together they select three additional willing members, one of whom must be from outside the studio area. This faculty member may be from Art History or another department. A Committee on Studies Approval Form is submitted to the Department Director of Graduate Studies for approval by the Department Chairperson and for forwarding to Graduate Studies. Changes in the membership of the committee are also made in consultation with the Department Director of Graduate Studies and with the approval of the Department Chairperson.

Once the Committee on Studies has been established, it assumes the responsibility for guiding the student in academic and procedural matters. This in no way relieves the graduate student of his or her responsibility for complying with all regulations of the Department, College, and University, as stated elsewhere in this Catalog.

Any grievance or conflict between students, faculty, staff, or administrators regarding graduate student matters shall be taken to the following, in this order, in an attempt to resolve the issue:

  1. Chairperson of the student’s Committee on Studies
  2. Department Director of Graduate Studies
  3. Department Graduate Committee
  4. Chairperson of the Department
  5. College Graduate Committee
  6. Dean of the College
  7. Dean of Graduate Studies
  8. Faculty Senate Graduate Committee

M.F.A. Qualifying Review

1.  The four-member Committee on Studies comprises the Qualifying Examination Committee.
2.  The exam is given during the 12th week of the regular semester immediately after the student completes 18 graduate credit hours and has had two successful graduate reviews.
3.  This examination consists of three parts:

  • a review of a comprehensive selection of the student’s work.
  • presentation of a formal typed essay of 7–12 pages (2,400–4,200 words) on the work to be reviewed (to be distributed to each committee member and the Department Graduate Office at least three days prior to the review).
  • an oral defense of the work by the candidate.

4.  The candidate is informed at the conclusion of the exam of the results, which must be one of the following:

  • Pass, granted by the exam committee.
  • Fail with option granted by the review committee for a single retake. The second exam is given following completion of at least a 3 credit hour tutorial with the Chairperson of the Committee on Studies. A second failure results in being dropped from the program for unsatisfactory progress toward the degree.
  • Fail with no retest. The student is dropped from the program for unsatisfactory progress toward the degree. 

Advancement to Candidacy and Comprehensive Examination

Between the Qualifying Review and Advancement to Candidacy, students should meet on a regular basis (at least once a semester) with their Committee on Studies to plan and monitor the program of studies and to review their creative work.

Admission to graduate study and a successful Qualifying Review do not imply Advancement to Candidacy for a degree. The M.F.A. student must formally apply for and be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The Application for Candidacy is the vehicle that formally establishes the student’s program of studies.

In order to be advanced to candidacy, the student must file an Application for Candidacy and have a formal Advancement to Candidacy and Comprehensive Examination meeting. The Application for Candidacy is filed when the student has completed the majority of the coursework (40–45 credit hours) and can, with some confidence, project the remaining courses in their program of studies. The Announcement of the Comprehensive Examination is filed with the Application for Candidacy and Appointment of Dissertation Committee form. In any event, the examination must be held no later than the semester before the student registers for dissertation credit hours.

The purpose of the Comprehensive Examination meeting is for the Committee on Studies to:

1.  Certify that the Residency Requirement has been met.
2.  Review the work and give an oral Comprehensive Examination in order to establish the following:

  • that an outline of the student’s dissertation, exhibition, catalog, and public talk is sufficient to allow the student to undertake his research.
  • that the student’s general knowledge of critical and historical issues in art is at a level expected of an M.F.A. candidate.

If problems arise with any of the above, the Committee may choose to meet again after the student has had sufficient time to remedy any shortcomings. In this case, a written summary of what is expected in the way of additional coursework or preparation needed for advancement must be furnished to the student (with a copy to the Department Director of Graduate Studies).

Approval of candidacy is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies only after the residency requirement is met and the program of studies has been approved by the Committee on Studies and the Department Director of Graduate Studies, providing the student has passed their comprehensive exam.

Approval of Candidacy in no way implies successful completion of the M.F.A. degree.

Dissertation Credit Hours

Enrollment in Dissertation (699) may not begin prior to the semester in which the student is Advanced to Candidacy and passed the comprehensive exam.

Once the student has enrolled for Art Studio/Art History dissertation (699), he or she must maintain continuous enrollment (exclusive of summer session) until the dissertation/final project is accepted by the Committee on Studies and the Dean of Graduate Studies. In extraordinary circumstances, the Dean of Graduate Studies may waive the requirement for continuous enrollment upon presentation of a written request from the committee chairperson and the graduate unit.

M.F.A. candidates must be enrolled during the semester in which they graduate, including the summer session.

Creative work done for the dissertation is substantially new work executed specifically for the final exhibition. The exhibition is in no way to be thought of as a retrospective of work done through class or tutorial instruction.

The dissertation/final project consists of:

  1. a solo exhibition of studio work organized and installed by the student;
  2. an exhibition catalog assembled by the student, which includes a written essay about or related to the issues represented in the creative work (10-15 pp. in length); and
  3. a public presentation, a talk, or event that informs the audience about the nature of the creative process involved in the creation of the work.

Time Limit to Complete Requirements

A candidate for the M.F.A. has five years for completion of all degree requirements from the date the student is formally advanced to candidacy by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Under extenuating circumstances, a student may request an extension of this time limit in writing but it must be done prior to the end of the time limit. The request must be supported by his or her Committee on Studies, the Department Graduate Director, the Department Chairperson and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Notification of Intent to Graduate

The semester before the student intends to graduate, the student should inform the Department Graduate Office and, through it, Graduate Studies, of the intention to complete all degree requirements during the semester. Degrees are awarded three times during the year; commencement exercises are held in May and December.

The Final Examination

The M.F.A. Final Oral Examination is given in conjunction with the exhibition of creative work. The Committee on Studies, and other such persons as the Dean of Graduate Studies may require to be present, conducts the examination.

The examination covers the exhibition (the studio work and its installation), final copy of the exhibition catalog, and the public presentation. In order for the student to graduate in a given semester, the examination must be held no later than the published dates in November, April, and July.

The student must notify Graduate Studies at least two weeks before the date of the examination on the forms available. Results of the examination are recorded on the reverse side of the final examination announcement form. The student is responsible for initiating the procedure and making sure that the original notice is sent to Graduate Studies.

At the conclusion of the examination, the voting members shall confer in camera and vote their recommendations. The Committee may 1) recommend that the exhibition, catalog, and public talk be approved without change; 2) recommend that the exhibition, catalog, and public talk be approved subject only to minor corrections, editorial or otherwise; or 3) require the catalog be revised before approval. In the case of 1) or 2), no further meeting of the Committee is required. The Chairperson of the Committee is responsible for seeing that the corrections are made. In the case of 3), the full Committee must determine if their recommendations have been fulfilled.

Two original copies of the catalog, six slides and six or more digital files such as jpgs, shall be deposited with the Department Graduate Office, as a permanent record of the visual work.


Master of Fine Arts to focus on Lithography

Tamarind Institute and Department of Art, University of New Mexico

In addition to its Professional Printer Training and Master Printer Training programs, Tamarind Institute now offers, in cooperation with the University of New Mexico’s Department of Art, the option of pursuing the Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) upon completion of the Tamarind program. Degree requirements can normally be completed in three years. Credit hours taken at Tamarind can be applied to the M.F.A. program.

All students must have a strong interest in collaborative printmaking as Tamarind’s programs focus on the acquisition of the technical and interpersonal skills for collaborative lithography. Students apply directly to TI for admission to the Professional Printer Training Program, and all students must complete the first year Professional Printer Training at Tamarind. This intensive program requires a time commitment of a minimum of 60 hours per week.

At the end of the Fall semester of the Professional Printer Training Program, students who wish to pursue the M.F.A. must apply for admission to graduate study to the University of New Mexico by January 15. The M.F.A. is the terminal degree in studio art and emphasizes the creative aspects of an individual’s work.

Students must meet all the criteria and be accepted by the Department of Art in order to pursue the M.F.A. after completing the Professional Printer Training Program at Tamarind. Acceptance into the M.F.A. program is not guaranteed. Those who wish to be assured of having a place in the M.F.A. program for the second year must be accepted simultaneously to Tamarind and the Department of Art (note that the department's deadline for admission is January 15; Tamarind’s deadline is February 1). Accepted candidates who do not participate in the Master Printer Program at Tamarind (only 1 – 3 candidates are accepted into this program each year) complete years 2 and 3 in the Department of Art. See below for M.F.A. degree requirements.

During the Spring semester of the Professional Printer Training Program, students interested in pursuing the Tamarind Master Printer Program must submit an application to the Master Printer Training Program at Tamarind. If accepted to the Master Printer Program, M.F.A. students stay at Tamarind for year 2, then complete A&AH requirements during year 3. M.F.A./Master Printer Program students receive a stipend from TI, and must register for 12 credit hours each semester while in the Master Printer Program. All M.F.A. students must take the Methods course in the Fall semester of the second year and the Interdisciplinary Seminar in the Fall semester of the third year.

Students who have completed the Professional Printer Training Program, but do not wish to pursue the M.F.A., also have the opportunity to apply for the Master Printer program. If accepted, they receive a stipend, but they are not required to register for credit.

Course requirements: Tamarind 1 year + 2 years M.F.A.

  Credit
Hours
Fall 1  (Tamarind)
  Professional Lithography I (4-AS) 
  Lithography Workshop (2-AS)
Spring 1 (Tamarind)  
  Professional Lithography II (3-AS)
  History of Graphic Arts II (3-AH)
  Total Non-Degree credit hours 12
  Students must be enrolled as a Non-Degree Student during their first year.  
  Students must be accepted into the M.F.A. program their second year.  
  Students need to fulfill these remaining M.F.A. credit hour requirements in years 2 and 3:  
  ARTS 502 Interdisciplinary Seminar (must be taken Fall 2) 3
  Art Studio courses 12
  Art History courses 3
  Electives outside of studio 6
  Electives outside of department 6
  Free electives 6
  Credit hours from M.F.A. program 36
  Credit hours from TI (non-degree) +12
  Required for M.F.A. 48
  Dissertation credit hours +12
  Total required for M.F.A. Degree
60

 
Course requirements: Tamarind 2 years + 1 year M.F.A.

Credit
Hours
 
Fall 1 (Tamarind)
  Professional Lithography I (4-AS)
  Lithography Workshop I (2-AS)
Spring 1 (Tamarind)  
  Professional Lithography II (3-AS)
  History of Graphic Arts II (3-AH)
  Total Non-Degree credit hours 12
  Students must be enrolled as a Non-Degree Student during their first year.  
  Students must be accepted into the M.F.A. program their second year.  
Fall 2 ARTH 500 Philosophy and Methods of Art History 3
  ARTS 595 Graduate Tutorial (with Tamarind instructors: Master Printer Program) 9
Spring 2 ARTS 595 Graduate Tutorial (with Tamarind instructors: Master Printer Program) 12
Fall 3 ARTS 502 Interdisciplinary Seminar 9
  Any 500-level graduate Art Studio or Art History courses  
Spring 3 ARTS 699 Dissertation 12
Subtotal Art Studio (9 from non-degree) 33-42
  Art History (3 from non-degree) 6-15
Total Required for M.F.A. 48
  Dissertation credit hours +12
  Total required for M.F.A. Degree 60

 
More information on Department of Art's graduate program, as well as links to Graduate Studies, can be found at the Department of Art Web site.

Tamarind Institute is a division of the College of Fine Arts of the University of New Mexico.


Master of Arts in Art Education

Art Education Program
112 Masley Hall
College of Fine Arts
MSC05 3040
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
(505) 277-5861

Application Deadlines
Fall semester March 30
Spring semester October 30


The graduate program offers two options leading to a Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in Art Education: 

  • M.A. in Art Education with New Mexico Pre K-12 Licensure coursework
  • M.A. in Art Education (non-licensure) under Plan I (with a thesis) or Plan II (without a thesis)

Emphasis in this graduate program is given to the humanistic aspects of art and education and to a blending of creative work, research and art pedagogy. Although the art education program consists of individual faculty with different backgrounds, expertise and philosophies, they tend to agree and emphasize art education foremost as a humanistic profession where the growth and development of the individual is paramount and where the art experience is central to that enterprise.

Requirements for Graduation

  1. Formation of a graduate faculty committee on studies (including an advisor-chairperson), which helps the student plan a graduate program of studies and conducts the student’s master’s exam;
  2. In consultation with the student’s committee on studies, submission of approval a planned program of graduate study (coursework), which is called a Program of Studies;
  3. Completion of the planned program of studies with at least a “B” average;
  4. Plan I candidates only: completion and acceptance of a master’s thesis;
  5. Passing of a written and oral master’s exam taken in the semester degree requirements are completed;
  6. Exhibition of at least one art work done during the master’s program in our annual graduating students’ exhibition;
  7. Other miscellaneous requirements unique to each student’s program of studies. See the Graduate Program section of this Catalog for general and specific requirements for a Master’s degree.

Core Courses

Credit
Hours
ARTE 500 History and Philosophies of Art Education 3
ARTE 585 Research Applied to Art Education 3
ARTE 590 Current Trends and Issues in Art Education 3


Program of Study for the M.A. – Licensure Coursework Option

A graduate student may elect to attain the M.A. in Art Education while taking coursework that will qualify them to apply for a Pre K-12 New Mexico Art Teaching License from the State of New Mexico. This option requires 36 credit hours of art prerequisites to include 9 credit hours of Art History and 27 credit hours of Art Studio to include drawing (6 credit hours), a non-drawing studio area of focus (9 credit hours) and studio courses addressing a variety of 2- and 3-D mediums.

In addition to the M.A. in Art Education core courses (9 credit hours) and 6 credit hours of 500-level elective coursework, M.A. students seeking licensure are required to take coursework for Professional Education for the M.A. in Art Education with Licensure: 33 credit hours.

Credit
Hours
ARTE 310 Teaching Art in the Elementary School with Field Lab 4
ARTE 320 Teaching Art in Secondary School with Field Lab 4
ARTE 400 Elementary School Student Teaching in Art 4-6
ARTE 461 Secondary School Student Teaching in Art 5-6
ARTE 510 Curriculum Development in Art Education 3
ARTE 531-537 Select one from: ARTE 531, 533, 534, 535, 536, 537. 3
ARTE 532 Studio Art in Schools: Digital Arts 3
ARTE 565
-or-
ARTE 566
Art and the Exceptional Child

Art With At-Risk Students
3
ARTE 572 Art Criticism and Aesthetics for Teachers 3
Required Courses for Licensure (not required for the M.A.)
EDPY 503 Principles of Human Development 3
EDUC *438
-or-
LLSS 538
Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Field

Teaching Reading Through the Content Field
3
Total for M.A. Licensure Coursework Option 53-56


Program of Study for the M.A. – Non-Licensure Option

Plan I (with thesis): minimum 24 credit hours plus thesis project.
Plan II (without thesis): minimum 33 credit hours plus Master’s exam.

3 credit hours research: Working with an advisor, students choose a 500-level research course.

3 credit hours social and/or cultural studies: Working with an advisor, students choose a 500-level course that addresses social and cultural ideas.

In consultation with the advisor and committee on studies, students choose 9 credit hours of coursework to support learning in an art education supporting area. For example, students may choose supporting areas such as Art Education and Special Populations, Diversities and Identities, or Imagination and Visual Studies. Students then choose 9 credit hours of elective coursework to complete their program of studies.

Minor in Art Education

Students pursuing the graduate minor in Art Education will benefit in two ways: They will engage in systematic study guided by an Art Education faculty member, and they will have the 12 credit hour minor represented on their transcript. It is recommended that M.A. students pursuing the Art Education minor have an Art Education faculty member on their committee.

Requirements

Credit
Hours
ARTE 500 History and Philosophies in Art Education 3
ARTE 585 Research Applied to Art Education 3
ARTE 590 Current Trends and Issues in Art Education 3
ARTE 500-level Elective 3


Application Information

Individuals interested in specific information about the Master’s program in art education may apply request an application packet online.

A meeting with a faculty advisor may be requested by calling (505) 277-5861.

General Academic Prerequisites

Before applying to the Master’s program in art education, an applicant must have the following minimum academic prerequisites:

  1. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited university, which includes at least 24 credit hours combined of art, art history and/or art education coursework with at least a “B” average (3.0 GPA); and
  2. A 3.0 overall GPA in the applicant’s last two years of undergraduate work. Applicants must have completed 18 credit hours of the required art prerequisites prior to admission. Application to the Pre K–12 Art Teaching Licensure option requires additional prerequisites. See the Graduate Program section of this Catalog for general prerequisites and application procedures for graduate study at the University of New Mexico.

Application Process

Visit the College of Fine Arts Web site for application instructions.

  • Completed and signed Graduate Application form, or apply online, (online application for first-time domestic applicants only).
  • Residency form.
  • $50.00 non-refundable application fee.
  • One (1) official transcript from each college you have attended (Exception: UNM transcripts).
  • Letter of Intent.
  • Three (3) Letters of Recommendation.
  • Resume.
  • Ten (10) slides or photographs artwork or CD.

Doctor of Philosophy in Art History

Degree Requirements

See the Ph.D. degree general requirements described in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog. Those admitted to the Ph.D. program without an M.A. in Art History may be required to take additional graduate courses beyond the minimum Ph.D. requirement of 48 credit hours of coursework; in all cases they must take and pass the M.A. Comprehensive Examination.

  Credit
Hours
  Coursework  
A. A minimum of 48 credit hours of coursework beyond the bachelor's degree, exclusive of dissertation: 48 
  •  A maximum of 30 credit hours from the M.A. degree, if approved, may be counted toward the 48 credit hour requirement
  •  ARTH graduate courses in the concentration and graduate courses in supporting fields
  •  Minimum coursework
  ARTH Dissertation 18
  Total 66
B. Within the context of courses listed above:  
  A minimum of 18 credit hours of 500-level courses or above completed at the University of New Mexico  
  At least 18 credit hours completed in residence at the University  


Because of the specialized nature of the Doctoral degree in Art History, emphases at the Master’s level are concentrations at this level.

Ph.D. Concentrations:
19th and 20th Century Western Art History
Art of Colonial America–Art of the United States
Built Environment (see below for concentration specific requirements)
History of Architecture
History of the Graphic Arts
History of Photography
Modern Latin America/Latino Art History
Native American Art History
Pre-Columbian Art History
Spanish Colonial Art History

The 18 credit hours in Art History graduate courses in the concentration and graduate course in supporting fields can be taken from the course listing under the Master’s section.

Time Limit to Complete Requirement

A doctoral candidate has five years for completion of all degree requirements from the date the student is formally Advanced to Candidacy by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Students seeking the Ph.D. degree must demonstrate, beyond a general mastery of the discipline, comprehensive knowledge of their fields of study and the ability to conduct original research. Required coursework outside the Department of Art are determined by the student’s particular needs and shall be undertaken only with the advice and approval of his/her Committee on Studies.

Committee on Studies

The doctoral program is governed by a system of mentorship. Students seeking the Ph.D. must form a Committee on Studies, in consultation with the proposed Chairperson of the Committee and the Department Director of Graduate Studies, and with the approval of the Department Chairperson, during their first semester in residency. Changes in membership are also made in this manner. Dissertation committees consists of at least four members approved for graduate instruction (normally regular, full-time University of New Mexico faculty appointments). The external committee member, must hold a regular, full-time faculty appointment outside the student’s unit/department at the University of New Mexico or another accredited institution. The fourth committee member may be a regular University of New Mexico faculty member or non-faculty expert in the student’s major research areas. The chairperson must be a regular University of New Mexico faculty member from the department, and the dissertation committee must be approved by the Department.

Advancement to Candidacy

Students admitted to the doctoral program with an M.A. from another institution must meet the following general requirements before advancing to candidacy: ARTH 500, and Spring Symposium (Spring semester) (see M.A. Degree Requirements). Doctoral students admitted with an M.A. in a field other than Art History must also pass the Department M.A. Comprehensive Examination. Advancement to Candidacy usually takes place during the semester in which the student completes the minimum of 18 credit hours of coursework (500-level and above) beyond the M.A. In addition to those listed in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog, the requirements for advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D. are:

  1. Evidence of proficiency in at least two foreign languages appropriate to the student's area of concentration (see Department Graduate Advisor for methods of fulfilling this requirement).
  2. Successful completion of the Doctoral Comprehensive Examination, administered by the student's Committee on Studies; this written examination tests the student's comprehensive knowledge of the field of specialization.
  3. Fulfillment of residency requirements.
  4. Acceptance of dissertation proposal. A preliminary outline of the proposed dissertation subject and research must be approved by the student's Committee on Studies prior to beginning enrollment in Dissertation.

Dissertation and Defense

The dissertation demonstrates the student’s ability to undertake original research and to write a readable, scholarly argument of book length. The student is expected to have complete knowledge of the historical, critical, theoretical, and methodological issues raised by the subject. The student defends the dissertation in an oral examination administered by the Committee on Studies.

The student must notify Graduate Studies at least two weeks before the date of the dissertation defense on the forms available. Results of the defense are recorded on the reverse side of the final examination announcement form. The student is responsible for initiating the procedure and making sure that the original notice is sent to Graduate Studies.

Concentration in Built Environment

Admissions Committee

An admission committee formed of the Art History faculty and members of the School of Architecture and Planning review applications to this program. Members of the committee meet after the application deadline to discuss and decide.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must have earned an M.Arch., M.L.A., Master's in Planning, or M.A. in Art History, or equivalent as judged by the admissions committee. These degrees may provide up to 30 credit hours towards the PhD. The admissions committee may require additional courses and activities depending on the applicants’ previous education and experience.

Committee on Studies

In the first semester the student chooses a Committee on Studies that assist in course selection and act as advisors and evaluators of requirements to degree. The committee consists of two Art History faculty (one of whom is the chair of the committee), and two School of Architecture and Planning faculty (one of whom acts as the Built Environment mentor responsible for advisement regarding that discipline). All tenured, tenure-track, and Professors of Practice in Art History and the School of Architecture and Planning are eligible to serve on committees.

Coursework Requirements

  • 48 credit hours (minimum) are required, of which 24 must be completed at UNM.
  • 30 credit hours (maximum) from the M.A., M.Arch., M.L.A., or M. Planning degree may be counted towards the 48 credit hour requirement on approval. A minimum of 6 credit hours of UNM graduate-level Art History or History of Architecture (offered by School of Architecture and Planning) are required to fulfill the residency requirement (if the master's degree was not granted by UNM or there were insufficient credit hours).
  • 14-15 credit hours in Art History graduate-level courses including ARTH 500 Philosophy and Methods of Art History, and 12 credit hours from Art History, School of Architecture and Planning History of Architecture courses, or other courses chosen in consultation with the student’s committee.
  • 4 credit hours in the School of Architecture and Planning including ARCH 619 Built Environment Teaching Colloquium (1 credit hour), and a research course selected from ARCH/CRP/LA 590 Historic Research Methods, ARCH 621 Research Methodology, and CRP 513 Qualitative Research Methods (3 credit hours).

The Department of Art’s Responsibility

The Department of Art’s responsibility includes the evaluation of the creative work exhibited for the solo exhibition, catalog, and public presentation. The Department Director of Graduate Studies verifies to the Dean of Graduate Studies on designated forms the departmental approval.


Courses

ARTE 214. Art in Elementary and Special Classrooms I. (3)



ARTE 310. Teaching Art in the Elementary School with Field Lab. (4)



ARTE 320. Teaching Art in Secondary School with Field Lab. (4)



ARTE 391 / 591. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ARTE 400. Elementary School Student Teaching in Art. (4-6)



ARTE 410 / 510. Curriculum Development in Art Education. (3)



ARTE 431 / 531. Studio Art in the School: Bookmaking. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 432 / 532. Studio Art in Schools: Digital Arts. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 433 / 533. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 434 / 534. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking Advanced Secondary Level. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 435 / 535. Studio Art in Schools: Drawing, Painting, Collage. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 436 / 536. Studio Art in Schools: Textile Arts. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 437 / 537. Studio Art in Schools: Clay. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 461. Secondary School Student Teaching in Art. (5-6)



ARTE 465 / 565. Art and the Exceptional Child. (3)



ARTE 466 / 566. Art With At-Risk Students. (3)



ARTE 472. Art Criticism and Aesthetics Teacher. (3)



ARTE 475. Art, Architecture and Environmental Education in the Schools. (3)



ARTE 477 / 577. Social Justice Issues in Art Education. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 493 / 593. Topics. (1-3, no limit Δ)



ARTE 500. History and Philosophies of Art Education. (3)



ARTE 510 / 410. Curriculum Development in Art Education. (3)



ARTE 531 / 431. Studio Art in the School: Bookmaking. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 532 / 432. Studio Art in Schools: Digital Arts. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 533 / 433. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 534 / 434. Studio Art in Schools: Printmaking Advanced Secondary Level. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 535 / 435. Studio Art in Schools: Drawing, Painting, Collage. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 536 / 436. Studio Art in Schools: Textile Arts. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 537 / 437. Studio Art in Schools: Clay. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 565 / 465. Art and the Exceptional Child. (3)



ARTE 566 / 466. Art With At-Risk Students. (3)



ARTE 568. Image and Imagination in Art Education. (3)



ARTE 572. Art Criticism and Aesthetics for Teachers. (3)



ARTE 577 / 477. Social Justice Issues in Art Education. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTE 585. Research Applied to Art Education. (3)



ARTE 590. Current Trends and Issues in Art Education. (3)



ARTE 591 / 391. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ARTE 593 / 493. Topics. (1-3, no limit Δ)



ARTE 595. Advanced Field Experiences. (3-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



ARTE 598. Directed Readings in Art Education. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ARTE 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



ARTH 101. Introduction to Art. (3)



ARTH 201. History of Art I. (3)



ARTH 202. History of Art II. (3)



ARTH 210. History of Photography. (3)



ARTH 250. Modern Art. (3)



ARTH 252. Contemporary Art and New Media. (3)



ARTH 310. Global Photographies. (3)



ARTH 321. Early Medieval Art, 500-1000 CE. (3)



ARTH 322. High Medieval Art, 1000-1200 CE. (3)



ARTH 323 / 567. World Architecture I: History of the Built Environment from Prehistory to 1800 CE. (3)



ARTH 324. World Architecture II: History of the Built Environment From 1800 CE to the Present. (3)



ARTH *340. Baroque Art. (3)



ARTH 351. Artistic Traditions of the Southwest. (3)



ARTH 379 / 579 [479 / 579]. American Art: 1876-1940. (3)



ARTH 402 / 502. Native American Art I. (3)



ARTH 406 / 506. Native American Art II. (3)



ARTH 407 / 507. Museum Practices. (3)



ARTH 411 / 511. Pre-Columbian Art: Mesoamerica. (3)



ARTH 412 / 512. Pre-Columbian Art: South America. (3)



ARTH 413 / 513. Pre-Columbian Art: Central America, Northern South America and the Caribbean. (3)



ARTH 415 / 515. Modern and Contemporary Native American Art. (3)



ARTH 416 / 516. Southwestern Native Ceramics. (3)



ARTH 417 / 517. Seminar in Souvenir Native American Arts . (3)



ARTH 420 / 520. History of Prints I [History of Graphic Arts I]. (3)



ARTH 421 / 521. History of Prints II [History of the Graphic Arts II]. (3)



ARTH 425 / 525. 19th-Century Photography. (3)



ARTH 426 / 526. 20th-Century Photography. (3)



ARTH 427 / 527. Contemporary Photography. (3)



ARTH 429. Topics in Art History. (1-3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 431 / 531. Byzantine Art and Architecture. (3)



ARTH 432 / 532. Islamic Art and Architecture. (3)



ARTH 449 / 549. Art of Spain. (3)



ARTH 450 / 550. Ibero-American Colonial Arts and Architecture. (3)



ARTH 453 / 553. African American Art. (3)



ARTH 464 / 564. European Art 1750-1830. (3)



ARTH 472 / 572. American Art: 1675-1875. (3)



ARTH 481 / 595. European Art 1830-1900. (3)



ARTH 485 / 585. Seminar in Museum Methods. (3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 486 / 586. Practicum: Museum Methods. (1-3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 487 / 587. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTH 490 / 590. Muralism in the Americas- 19th and 20th Centuries and Beyond. (3)



ARTH 491 / 591. Late 20th-Century to 21st-Century Art. (3)



ARTH 492 / 592. American Landscapes. (3)



ARTH 493. The Art of Latin America, 1820-1945. (3)



ARTH 494 / 594. The Art of Latin America, 1945-Present. (3)



ARTH 496. Undergraduate Tutorial. (3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 498. Art History Capstone. (0)



ARTH 499. Honors Thesis. (3-6)



ARTH 500. Philosophy and Methods of Art History. (3)



ARTH 502 / 402. Native American Art I. (3)



ARTH 506 / 406. Native American Art II. (3)



ARTH 507 / 407. Museum Practices. (3)



ARTH 511 / 411. Pre-Columbian Art: Mesoamerica. (3)



ARTH 512 / 412. Pre-Columbian Art: South America. (3)



ARTH 513 / 413. Pre-Columbian Art: Central America, Northern South America and the Caribbean. (3)



ARTH 515 / 415. Modern and Contemporary Native American Art. (3)



ARTH 516 / 416. Southwestern Native Ceramics. (3)



ARTH 517 / 417. Seminar in Souvenir Native American Arts. (3)



ARTH 520 / 420. History of Prints I [History of Graphic Arts I]. (3)



ARTH 521 / 421. History of Prints II [History of the Graphic Arts II]. (3)



ARTH 522 [522 / 422]. Contemporary Architecture. (3)



ARTH 525 / 425. 19th-Century Photography. (3)



ARTH 526 / 426. 20th-Century Photography. (3)



ARTH 527 / 427. Contemporary Photography. (3)



ARTH 529. Topics in Art History. (1-3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 531 / 431. Byzantine Art and Architecture. (3)



ARTH 532 / 432. Islamic Art and Architecture. (3)



ARTH 549 / 449. Art of Spain. (3)



ARTH 550 / 450. Ibero-American Colonial Arts and Architecture. (3)



ARTH 551 / 552. Problems. (2-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



ARTH 553 / 453. African American Art. (3)



ARTH 559. Seminar in Native American Art. (3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 560. Seminar in Pre-Columbian Art. (3, may be repeated four times Δ)



ARTH 564 / 464. European Art 1750-1830. (3)



ARTH 567 / 323. World Architecture I: History of the Built Environment From Prehistory to 1800 CE. (3)



ARTH 572 / 472. American Art: 1675-1875. (3)



ARTH 579 / 379 [579 / 479]. American Art: 1876-1940. (3)



ARTH 580. Seminar in Spanish Colonial Art. (3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 582. Seminar in 20th-Century Art. (3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 583. Seminar in Modern/Contemporary Latin American Art History. (3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 584. Problems in Interdisciplinary Studies. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTH 585 / 485. Seminar in Museum Methods. (3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 586 / 486. Practicum: Museum Methods. (1-3, no limit Δ)



ARTH 587 / 487. Contemporary Interdisciplinary Topics. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTH 590 / 490. Muralism in the Americas- 19th and 20th Centuries and Beyond. (3)



ARTH 591 / 491. Late 20th-Century to 21st-Century Art. (3)



ARTH 592 / 492. American Landscapes. (3)



ARTH 594 / 494. The Art of Latin America 1945-Present . (3)



ARTH 595 / 481. European Art 1830-1900. (3)



ARTH 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



ARTH 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



ARTS 106. Drawing I. (3)



ARTS 121. Two-dimensional Design. (3)



ARTS 123. Shop Foundations. (2)



ARTS 125. Art Practices I. (3)



ARTS 126. Art Practices II. (3)



ARTS 130. Introduction to Electronic Art. (3)



ARTS 141. Introduction to Art and Ecology. (3)



ARTS 157. Small Scale Metal Construction I. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 168. Introduction to Ceramics. (3)



ARTS 187. Introduction to Photography. (3)



ARTS 188. Visualizing Ideas Using Photography. (3)



ARTS 205. Drawing II. (3)



ARTS 207. Painting I. (3)



ARTS 208. Painting II. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 213. Sculpture I. (3)



ARTS 231. Video Art I. (3)



ARTS 232. Sound Art I. (3)



ARTS 257. Small Scale Metal Construction II. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 268. Ceramics: Materials and Aesthetics. (3)



ARTS 274. Introduction to Printmaking. (3)



ARTS 287. Black and White Photography. (3)



ARTS 289. Digital Imaging Techniques. (3)



ARTS 305. Drawing III. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 308. Painting III. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 310. Figure Drawing. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 313. Intermediate Sculpture. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 320. The Phenomena of Color. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 330. Intermediate Electronic Art. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 331. Video Art II. (3)



ARTS 332. Sound Art II. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 333. Introduction to 3D Printing. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 337. Intaglio Printmaking I. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 338. Lithography Printmaking. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 341. Intermediate Studio in Art and Ecology. (3)



ARTS 345. Serigraphy. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 357. Small Scale Casting. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 367. Advanced Ceramics: Professional Practices Studio Arts Intensive I. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 370. Arita Porcelain Vessels. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 387. Intermediate Photography. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 388. Photographic Lighting. (3)



ARTS 389. Topics in Studio Art. (1-3, no limit Δ)



ARTS 394. Computer Generated Imagery and Animation. (3)



ARTS 405. Advanced Drawing. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 407. Advanced Painting. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 408. Outdoor Studio. (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 409 / 509. Advanced Video Art. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 413. Advanced Sculpture. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 429. Undergraduate Topics in Studio Art. (1-6 to a maximum of 15 Δ)



ARTS 431 / 531. Advanced Time-Based Media. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 432 / 532. Special Projects in Electronic Art I. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 433 / 533. Special Projects in Electronic Art II. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 434 / 534. Immersive Media. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 435 / 535. The Art of Transmission. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 437. Intaglio Printmaking II. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 438. Advanced Lithography. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 440 / 540. Art and Ecology: Grant and Proposal Writing. (3)



ARTS 441 / 541. Art and Ecology: Computational Sustainability. (3)



ARTS 442 / 542. Art and Ecology: Sculptural Infrastructure. (3)



ARTS 443 / 543. Art and Ecology: Aesthetics of Sustainable Landscapes. (3)



ARTS 444 / 544. Art and Ecology: Creating Change. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 445 / 545. Text and Image: Graphic Design for Artists. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 446 / 546. The Politics of Performance. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 451 / 551. Land Arts of the American West: Research. (3)



ARTS 452 / 552. Land Arts of the American West: Field Investigations. (3)



ARTS 453 / 553. Land Arts of the American West: Creative Production. (3)



ARTS 454 / 554. Land Arts of the American West: Presentation and Dissemination. (3)



ARTS 457. Advanced Casting and Construction. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 458 / 558. Nature and Technology. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 469 / 569. Pueblo Pottery. (3)



ARTS 470 / 570. Advanced Arita Porcelain Vessels. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 474. Advanced Printmaking. (3, may be repeated four times Δ)



ARTS 487. Advanced Interdisciplinary Portfolio. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 495. Independent Study. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 498. Senior Seminar: Art Studio Capstone. (2)



ARTS 499. Honors Thesis. (3, may be repeated once Δ [3-6])



ARTS 502. Interdisciplinary Seminar. (3)



ARTS 505. Graduate Drawing and Painting. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 508. Graduate Outdoor Studio. (1-3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 509 / 409. Advanced Video Art. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 513. Graduate Sculpture. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 520. Graduate Phenomena of Color. (3)



ARTS 529. Graduate Topics in Studio Art. (1-6 to a maximum of 12 Δ)



ARTS 531 / 431. Advanced Time-Based Media. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 532 / 432. Special Projects in Electronic Art I. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 533 / 433. Special Projects in Electronic Art II. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 534 / 434. Immersive Media. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 535 / 435. The Art of Transmission. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 540 / 440. Art and Ecology: Grant and Proposal Writing. (3)



ARTS 541 / 441. Art and Ecology: Computational Sustainability. (3)



ARTS 542 / 442. Art and Ecology: Sculptural Infrastructure. (3)



ARTS 543 / 443. Art and Ecology: Aesthetics of Sustainable Landscapes. (3)



ARTS 544 / 444. Art and Ecology: Creating Change. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 545 / 445. Text and Image: Graphic Design for Artists. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 546 / 446. The Politics of Performance. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 551 / 451. Land Arts of the American West: Research. (3)



ARTS 552 / 452. Land Arts of the American West: Field Investigations. (3)



ARTS 553 / 453. Land Arts of the American West: Creative Production. (3)



ARTS 554 / 454. Land Arts of the American West: Presentation and Dissemination. (3)



ARTS 557. Graduate Casting and Construction. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 558 / 458. Nature and Technology. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



ARTS 569 / 469. Pueblo Pottery. (3)



ARTS 570 / 470. Advanced Arita Porcelain Vessels. (3, may be repeated twice Δ)



ARTS 574. Graduate Printmaking. (3, may be repeated four times Δ)



ARTS 587. Graduate Visual Art Seminar. (3, may be repeated four times Δ)



ARTS 593. Seminar in Studio Art. (3, may be repeated three times Δ)



ARTS 595. Graduate Tutorial. (1-9 to a maximum of 21 Δ)



ARTS 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC 11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809