Graduate and Professional Dual Degree Programs

The University of New Mexico offers both formal and individualized Graduate and/or Professional dual degree programs. Students must adhere to the general graduate degree requirements as described in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog. Interested students should also review the appropriate departmental sections of this Catalog and consult with each program for detailed information. With the exception of the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Biomedical Sciences and those programs that involve the Juris Doctor (J.D.), students in Dual Degree programs must complete both degrees in the same semester.

Dual Degree Programs – Individual

To pursue an integrated course of study combining two master’s degree programs, graduate students may, with prior approval of the two department chairpersons, embark upon their own individualized dual degree program culminating in two master’s degrees. See the Graduate Program section of this Catalog for more information.


Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy in Biomedical Sciences

The Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Biomedical Sciences Dual Degree Program is designed to provide comprehensive training in both clinical sciences and a basic biomedical science discipline. The intent of the program is to provide students with an integrated and cohesive training experience while obtaining the M.D. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences. Students participate in activities common to both programs while involved in the M.D. curriculum or engaged in Ph.D. dissertation research.

Currently, the program consists of 18 months of the M.D. curriculum followed by 3-4 years of Ph.D. dissertation research and the graduate school curriculum. Students conclude with the remaining two years of the medical school curriculum. The Dual Degree Program is designed to be completed in 7-8 years. Applications to this Dual Degree Program should be made through the M.D. degree application process. Students take three one-month long rotations in research laboratories during the initial 24 months of the program. These experiences are meant to broaden the research experience of the students as they decide in what research area they wish to specialize. Students can pursue many lines of research activity performed by investigators in biomedical research in the School of Medicine. A total of 48 credit hours plus 18 dissertation credit hours plus good standing throughout the School of Medicine curriculum is required for the Dual Degree Program.

See the School of Medicine: Doctor of Medicine and the School of Medicine: Biomedical Sciences sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health

The Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) and Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) Dual Degree Program requires five years of integrated learning. This integrated learning enhances opportunities for medical students to acquire public health knowledge and skills with the goals of 1) reducing disparities in health status within New Mexican populations 2) strengthening physician advocacy and leadership skills in health policy development 3) fostering evidence-based interventions and 4) using assessment skills to better determine population needs and interventions. Each student in this Dual Degree Program would be able to successfully complete both degrees in an integrated fashion.

The student applies simultaneously to both the M.D. and the M.P.H. programs and indicates on the two applications that they are applying for the Dual Degree Program. Students must meet the requirements of both programs and be accepted into both programs in order to be considered.

Students are admitted to each program separately, yet once they are admitted to both programs, they qualify as Dual Degree Programs students. For more information on the M.D./M.P.H. Dual Degree Program, contact the College of Population Health.

See the School of Medicine: Doctor of Medicine and the College of Population Health: Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Students should have completed an undergraduate degree for consideration for admission to the program and must commit to the shared-credit Pharm.D. and M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences before completing their second year in the professional program. Applicants are considered for the program under the same criteria as applicants to the graduate program.

The shared-credit Master's program is completed under Plan I (thesis) in accordance with the regulations found in the Graduate Program section of this Catalog and requires developing a thesis project, documenting the completed project, and defending a thesis.

M.S. concentration in Pharmacoeconomics, Epidemiology, Pharmaceutical Policy and Outcomes Research

The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) and Master of Science (M.S.) in Pharmaceutical Sciences with a concentration in Pharmacoeconomics, Epidemiology, Pharmaceutical Policy and Outcomes Research (PEPPOR) Shared-Credit Degrees Program is designed to prepare students for leadership positions that demand knowledge of health sciences combined with research experience. The goal is to provide graduates with the skills, knowledge, and experience needed for positions in pharmacoeconomics, epidemiology, pharmaceutical policy, and outcomes research in academic settings, the pharmaceutical industry, or pharmacy management.

Requirements for the shared-credit Pharm.D. and M.S. include completion of the UNM College of Pharmacy Pharm.D. curriculum and the following:

Credit
Hours
Shared-Credit Courses
PHRM 545 Pharmacoeconomics 3
PHRM 546
-and/or-
PHRM 547
Healthcare Systems Review

Research Design and Analysis
3
PHRM 804 Public Health 2
PHRM 809 Pharmacy and Health Care Delivery Systems 2
PHRM 828 Pharmacoepidemiology and Research Design 2
PHRM 836 Pharmacoeconomics 2
PHRM 837 Pharmacy Management and Operations 3
Subtotal 17
PHRM 591 Seminar in Administrative Pharmacy 2
PHRM 599 Master's Thesis 6
Electives (graduate-level biostatistics, epidemiology, etc.) 6
Subtotal 14
Total 31


Note: PHRM 545, 546 and 547 are Pharm.D. electives.

Additional Information: Students must complete the M.S. within one year after completing the Pharm.D. Students who choose not to complete the graduate portion of the program are still awarded the Pharm.D. when the requirements are met. See the College of Pharmacy section of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.

M.S. concentration in Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Sciences

The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) and Master of Science (M.S.) in Pharmaceutical Sciences with a concentration in Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Sciences Shared-Credit Degrees Program provides the guidance necessary for the Pharm.D. student to effectively translate scientific concepts to pharmaceutical research. Pharmacy is a health profession that integrates elements of chemistry, biology, anatomy, physiology, and other biomedical sciences. The Pharm.D. curriculum includes extensive didactic clinical preparation, hands-on clinical practice experience in a wide array of healthcare settings, and a greater emphasis on clinical pharmacy practice pertaining to optimize pharmacotherapy. Pharm.D. students would benefit from advanced opportunities in formal scientific research experience. The M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences is a course- and research-based degree that affords the research experience necessary to apply the scientific method to advanced research in pharmacy.

There is a growing need for Pharm.D. professionals to have formal research training to prepare them for many grant programs for which they are eligible as clinical doctorates. This need would be aided significantly by a program that oversees a formal research project, providing a complete "research culture" experience such as would be provided in a Master’s degree program.

Requirements for the shared-credit Pharm.D. and M.S. include completion of the UNM College of Pharmacy Pharm.D. curriculum and the following:

Credit
Hours
Shared-Credit Courses
PHRM 801 Foundations of Drug Action 3
PHRM 802 Mechanisms of Drug Action I 3
PHRM 805 Mechanisms of Drug Action II 3
PHRM 810 Mechanisms of Drug Action III 3
PHRM 811 Introduction to Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry 4
Subtotal 16
Additional Graduate Coursework
PHRM 597 Research Problems in Pharmaceutical Sciences 2-3
Other graduate courses approved by the student's Committee on Studies
Subtotal 8
PHRM 593 Pharmaceutical Sciences and Toxicology Seminar (or other science seminar series available for graduate credit approved by the student's Committee on Studies) 2
PHRM 599 Master's Thesis 6
Total 32


In addition to the above, students are required to take at least one Pharm.D. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) research rotation with their M.S. faculty mentor. Students may opt to take one additional Pharm.D. research APPE rotation.

Additional Information: Students must complete the M.S. within one year after completing the Pharm.D. Students who choose not to complete the graduate portion of the program are still awarded the Pharm.D. when the requirements are met. See the College of Pharmacy section of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Business Administration

The College of Pharmacy and the Anderson School of Management offer a Dual Degree Program leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy and the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.). The program is designed to prepare students for leadership positions that demand knowledge of both health sciences and management concepts. The goal is to provide graduates with skills, knowledge, and experience needed for management positions in the pharmaceutical industry, with healthcare organizations, or for retail/independent pharmacies. Under this program, the College of Pharmacy accepts 6 credit hours of M.B.A. core courses as professional electives and the Anderson School of Management accepts 5 credit hours in the College of Pharmacy (PHRM 809, 837) toward the 15 credit hours of elective credit in the M.B.A. program. Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools. Those planning to enter the program should consult with the admission officers of both schools as early as possible. 

See the College of Pharmacy and Anderson School of Management: Master of Business Administration sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Juris Doctor and Master of Arts, Master of Science, or Doctor of Philosophy

A student in this program is able to earn the Juris Doctor (J.D.) and a Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), or Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in an academic field. To enroll, a student must receive permission from the Dean of the School of Law, the Graduate Dean, and the chairperson of the graduate unit offering the other degree. Students must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both Schools/College.

In choosing courses for any semester, the student must have the advice and consent of the Dean of the School of Law, the major advisor and the chairperson of the department in which a graduate degree is being sought; in the case of a student pursuing the Ph.D., the Dean of the School of Law shall appoint one member of the Committee on Studies. The School of Law accepts up to 6 credit hours of appropriate graduate courses toward the J.D. requirements, and the graduate unit concerned accepts up to 6 credit hours of law courses toward its’ degree requirements.

See the School of Law: Juris Doctor and the Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Latin American Studies

The Juris Doctor (J.D.) and Master of Arts (M.A.) in Latin American Studies Dual Degree Program is jointly administered by the Dean of the School of Law and the Associate Director of Academic Programs for Latin American Studies. The purpose of this program is to prepare legal professionals for work in Latin America or with Latinx populations in the United States. By combining legal training with Latin American language and area studies, the program enables students to develop professional skills directly applicable to Latin American nations and populations. In addition, the student earns two degrees in less time and at less expense than would be required if each were pursued separately. Requirements are as follows:

  • 80 credit hours of Law coursework (that must include 9 credit hours of international law),
  • 24 credit hours of Latin American Studies coursework, including LTAM 510 and a minimum of 12 credit hours from one concentration in the M.A. in Latin American Studies program, and
  • 3 credit hour bridge course covering subject matter linking Law and Latin American Studies.

Students start in the M.A. in Latin American Studies program for their first year of the dual degrees program. Students then begin the J.D. program with the first-year Law curriculum which consists of required courses that emphasize methods of legal reasoning, policy analysis, and the analysis of legal institutions. During their third and fourth years, students can choose from approximately 100 elective courses in developing individualized programs suited to their career goals.

To meet the exit requirements for the Latin American Studies component, students must complete a capstone paper that spans content taken under the chosen M.A. in Latin American Studies concentration and law topics. The capstone paper is overseen by a Committee on Studies composed of three faculty members (including at least one member of the Law faculty and one non-Law Latin American-specialized faculty member).

Competency in Spanish or Portuguese is required. Entrance requirements must be met for both programs; applications should be submitted simultaneously. All students follow Plan II (non-thesis). Students interested in the program should consult the advisors in the School of Law and in Latin American Studies.

See the School of Law: Juris Doctor and the College of Arts and Sciences: Latin American Studies Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Juris Doctor and Master of Accounting

The School of Law and the Anderson School of Management offer a Dual Degree Program leading to the Juris Doctor (J.D.) and Master of Accounting (M.Acct.). Under this program, the School of Law accepts 6 credit hours of M.Acct. coursework towards the J.D. and the Anderson School of Management accepts 6 credit hours of J.D. coursework towards the M.Acct., subject to pre-approval from the faculty advisor. Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both Schools. Anderson School of Management accepts the LSAT in lieu of the GMAT if the student has already been accepted into the School of Law and has earned a “B” or better in the two prerequisites for admission into the M.Acct., MGMT 502 and 503 or equivalent.

Those planning to enter the Dual Degree Program should consult with the admission officers of both Schools as early as possible, and must meet with their graduate program advisor to discuss course selection.

Requirements:

  • 86 credit hours of J.D. curriculum requirements, which may include 6 credit hours of shared-credit electives from the Anderson School of Management selected from the list below.
  • 6 credit hours of prerequisite accounting coursework: MGMT 502 and 503. One or both of the prerequisites may be waived if the student has completed undergraduate or graduate equivalents of these courses. Equivalent courses must be identified to the Graduate Programs Manager prior to admission to obtain approval to waive the coursework.
  • 33 credit hours of M.Acct. curriculum requirements, which may include 6 credit hours of shared-credit electives from the School of Law selected from the list below:
      15 specified credit hours of accounting coursework: MGMT 540, 541, 550, 594 (topics titled “Business and Finance Concepts for Accountants” only), 640.
      12 credit hours of accounting electives selected from the following list: MGMT 542, 543, 544, 546, 547, 548, 549, 590, 591, 592, 593, 594 (topics titled “Internal Auditing and Investigations” only), 641, 642.
      6 credit hours of School of Law graduate-level electives selected from the list below.

Shared-credit electives reduces the total required credit hours for the Dual Degree Program to 119 credit hours.

Electives

The 6 credit hours from the School of Law must be selected from the following list of courses: LAW 520, 523, 530, 531, 534, 537, 546, 564, 581, 582, 584, 593, 623, 629, 631, 642.

The 6 credit hours from the Anderson School of Management must be selected from the following list of courses: MGMT 542, 543, 544, 546, 547, 548, 549, 590, 592, 593, 594 (Accounting special topics only), 641.

See the School of Law: Juris Doctor and the Anderson School of Management: Master of Accounting sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Juris Doctor and Master of Business Administration

The School of Law and the Anderson Graduate School of Management offer a Dual Degree Program leading to the Juris Doctor (J.D.) and Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.). Under this program, the School of Law accepts 6 credit hours of M.B.A. coursework toward the J.D. degree, and the Anderson School of Management accepts 6 credit hours of J.D. coursework toward the 15 credit hours of elective credit in the second year of the M.B.A. program. Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools. Those planning to enter the dual program should consult with the admission officers of both Schools as early as possible.

See the School of Law: Juris Doctor and the Anderson School of Management: Master of Business Administration sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Juris Doctor and Master of Public Administration

Under this Dual Degree Program, a student is able to earn the Juris Doctor (J.D.) and the Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) in approximately three and one half to four years. To enroll in the Dual Degree Program, the student must have completed the first year in the School of Law; in addition, permission of both the Dean of the School of Law and the Director of Public Administration and formal admission to graduate study are required. Students must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both Schools.

A student will pursue the normal J.D. program. During each semester and summer the student works toward the fulfillment of the course requirements for the M.P.A. The School of Law accepts up to 6 credit hours of public administration courses toward the J.D. requirements, and the School of Public Administration accepts up to 6 credit hours of law courses toward the M.P.A. requirements. In addition, the student may count up to 6 additional credit hours of law courses toward the M.P.A. electives requirement: these credit hours, however, do not count toward J.D. requirements. If the student is in a thesis program, the thesis requirement may be completed during the summer or fall following graduation from the School of Law. In choosing courses for any semester, the student must have the advice and consent of the Dean of the School of Law and the Director of Public Administration.

See the School of Law: Juris Doctor and the School of Public Administration: Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Arts in Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies and Master of Arts in Latin American Studies

The Language, Literacy, and Sociocultural Studies department and the Latin American Studies program offer a Dual Degree Program leading to Master of Arts (M.A.) degrees in Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies and in Latin American Studies. This program is intended to allow education professionals to enhance their secondary school teaching with Latin American topics in the humanities and social sciences. The program combines advanced professional development in education with advanced interdisciplinary study of Latin America and is designed to help students integrate the two fields through coordinated advisement and bridge courses.

The Dual Degree Program requires 51 credit hours of coursework for students who hold teaching certificates. The program includes three components:

  • 21 credit hours of Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies courses with a focus in social studies education;
  • 21 credit hours of Latin American Studies coursework, including at least 9 credit hours in each of two concentrations;
  • 9 credit hours of bridge courses: two core courses and one elective.

Completed separately, the two degrees would require 69–72 credit hours. Under the Dual Degree Program, full-time students would be able to finish in approximately three years.

Students pursuing this Dual Degree Program must meet admissions requirements of both the College of Education and of Latin American Studies. Separate applications should be made simultaneously to the Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies department and to the Latin American Studies program.

It is expected that applicants to the Dual Degree Program already have completed the licensure requirements for secondary teaching. Students who are not licensed upon admission may pursue licensure through the post-baccalaureate program in the Department of Teacher Education, Educational Leadership and Policy. Students should contact the College of Education Advisement Center (505) 277-3190 for individual advisement. Latin American Studies students should be prepared for additional coursework for licensure.

Each candidate must meet the relevant M.A. in Latin American Studies and M.A. in Language, Literacy and Sociocultural exit requirements.

See the College of Education: Language, Literacy and Sociocultural Studies Graduate Program and the College of Arts and Sciences: Latin American Studies Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and Master of Business Administration

The Anderson School of Management and the Latin American Studies program offer a Dual Degree Program leading to the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) and the Master of Arts (M.A.) in Latin American Studies. This program is designed to prepare individuals for a diversity of dynamic and productive careers throughout the world in businesses, governments, private and governmental foundations, consulting firms, and other institutions with emphases on Latin America. 

Students must enter the program with two years of undergraduate coursework, or its equivalent, in Spanish and Portuguese. Applicants with otherwise strong qualifications but with limited Spanish competence may be admitted on the condition that they complete SPAN **352 Advanced Grammar within their first year of graduate study. Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both graduate programs. Those planning to enter this program should consult with the M.B.A. program office at the Anderson School of Management and with the Latin American Studies program as early as possible.

Under this program, the Anderson School of Management accepts 6 credit hours of M.A. coursework toward the 6 credit hours of elective credit in the accelerated M.B.A. program, and the Latin American Studies program accepts 6 credit hours of M.B.A. coursework toward required M.A. coursework. Requirements are as follows:

  • 24 credit hours of Latin American Studies courses, including LTAM 510 and a minimum of 12 credit hours from one concentration in the M.A. in Latin American Studies program. The remaining 9 credit hours may be used for electives and thesis (under Plan I) or electives (under Plan II).
  • 31 credit hours of Management courses, including: MGMT 501, 502, 504, 506, 508, 511, 520, 522, 526, 598, 600, and 601.

Students interested in the focused M.B.A. option should consult the graduate advisor regarding number of shared-credit hours.

See the College of Arts and Sciences: Latin American Studies Graduate Program and the Anderson School of Management: Master of Business Administration sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and Master of Community and Regional Planning

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Latin American Studies and Master of Community and Regional Planning (M.C.R.P.) Dual Degree Program is designed particularly for students who are interested in the professional practice of planning in a Latin American context. The program enables students to develop the skills and background necessary to assess public needs, determine and develop regional planning strategies and programs, and become familiar with land use planning concepts. 

The Community and Regional Planning department at the University of New Mexico is dedicated to planning and advocating for sustainable communities and ecosystems throughout the Southwest region and Latin America. Graduates of this Dual Degree Program possess the knowledge and skills necessary to support planning by diverse human communities throughout the Western Hemisphere. Students in this Dual Degree Program learn to assist Latin American communities to create community-based plans and programs that sustain and enhance their culture, resource base, built environment and economic vitality. The program promotes participatory processes that respond to community identities and development needs.

Prerequisites to the program are competence in either Spanish or Portuguese (at least two years of undergraduate coursework or equivalent language training) and basic coursework in economics (micro and/or macro) and statistics. Deficit courses in economics and statistics may be made up after admission to the program. Applicants with otherwise strong qualifications but with limited Spanish competence may be admitted on the condition that they complete SPAN **352 Advanced Grammar, within their first year of graduate study.

The M.A. in Latin American Studies and M.C.R.P. Dual Degree Program requires a minimum of 54 credit hours. The required graduate credit hours include:

  • CRP 578, a 3 credit hour bridge seminar;
  • 16 credit hours of Community and Regional Planning coursework: CRP 500, 511, 536, 580, 587;
  • 24 credit hours of Latin American Studies coursework, including LTAM 510 and a minimum of 12 credit hours from one concentration in the M.A. in Latin American Studies program;
  • 8 credit hours of professional project, capstone studio (including preparation seminar), or thesis: CRP (588 and 589) or 597 or 598 or 599; and
  • 3 elective credit hours of Community and Regional Planning coursework.

Students must also demonstrate capacity in two Community and Regional Planning competency areas, as determined in consultation with their advisors: 1) Providing a real-time professional deliverable to a client, and 2) Using spatial analysis to analyze planning problems and develop planning solutions. Each candidate is required to complete the relevant M.A. in Latin American Studies and M.C.R.P. exit requirements.

See the College of Arts and Sciences: Latin American Studies Graduate Program and the School of Architecture and Planning: Community and Regional Planning Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Arts in Latin American Studies and Master of Public Health

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Latin American Studies and Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) Dual Degree Program is intended to prepare graduates to improve the health of Latin American populations and Latinx populations in the United States, with a primary focus on New Mexico, the Southwest, the United States/Mexico border region, and regions south of the border. It supplements the M.P.H. program with in-depth study of languages, cultures, and societies that help prepare graduates to work effectively either in Latin America, or with Latinx populations within the United States. 

The M.A. in Latin American Studies and M.P.H. Dual Degree Program requires 63 credit hours. A minimum of 21 credit hours are required in Latin American Studies courses, and a minimum of 42 credit hours are required in Public Health courses. At least 13 credit hours of the M.P.H. component must have significant content related to Latin America or Latinx communities in the United States, to enable the student to integrate the content and practice of the two degrees.

Applicants for the Dual Degree Program must apply separately to and meet the entrance requirements of each program. Preference is given to students who have public health experience, which may be community development, research, health education, health science, health promotion, or other health-related work. Experience can be paid or voluntary.

Coursework for the M.A. in Latin American Studies component of the Dual Degree Program includes LTAM 510 and a minimum of 12 credit hours from one concentration in the M.A. in Latin American Studies program.

The M.P.H. component of the Dual Degree Program requires a minimum of 42 credit hours as follows:

  • 15 credit hours of M.P.H. component core: PH 501, 502, 503, 538, 552;
  • 6 credit hours of additional M.P.H. component courses: PH 507; 533 or 555;
  • 11 credit hours: M.P.H. courses with Latin American Studies content as follows: PH 579, 583; 596 or 597; 598; and Public Health courses with Latin American/U.S. Latino content or courses throughout the university with demonstrated content on health and Latin America (3 credit hours);
  • 10 credit hours: Related electives. Must include 3 credit hours of shared Public Health/Latin American Studies content.

Courses that may be taken as shared electives must include at least 40% of Latin American Studies content. Students may seek approval from the M.P.H. Program Director and the Latin American Studies Associate Director for Academic Programs to count other graduate courses toward their elective credit hours. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss with their Public Health advisor their particular interests, for example: policy, community health, or epidemiology, and relevant courses offered throughout the University.

Exit requirements for the Dual Degree Program include a professional paper that spans topics from public health and the M.A. in Latin American Studies concentration, a master's exam in Public Health, and either PH 596 Professional Paper or PH 597 Public Health Integrative Experience. The Integrative Experience or the professional paper must address a public health topic related to Latin America or Latinx populations in the U.S. The professional paper is supervised by a committee of three faculty members, including at least one Latin American Studies faculty member from outside the M.P.H. program.

See the College of Arts and Sciences: Latin American Studies Graduate Program and the College of Population Health: Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Business Administration and Master of Construction Management

The Anderson School of Management and the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering in the School of Engineering offer a Dual Degree Program leading to the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) and Master of Construction Management (M.C.M.). Under this program, students will be required to complete 31 credit hours of M.B.A. core, 15 credit hours of M.C.M. core, and 3 credit hours of M.C.M. elective for a total of 49 credit hours to complete both degrees.

Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both Schools. Those planning to enter this Dual Degree Program should consult with the admission offices of both Schools as early as possible.

The M.B.A./M.C.M. Dual Degree Program is designed to accommodate students with interest or experience in all aspects and sectors of the construction industry. Prospective students need not have an undergraduate degree in engineering; rather, they are more likely to have a degree from a related field such as management or architecture. However, since the program is structured to build upon the educational foundation gained with an undergraduate degree in construction management, civil engineering or similar areas, educational backgrounds different from construction management may need to take some undergraduate prerequisite courses. The M.C.M. program is completed online and the M.B.A. program has online and face-to-face options.

  • 31 credit hours of M.B.A. component core: MGMT 501, 502, 504, 506, 508, 511, 520, 522, 526, 598, 600.
  • 15 credit hours of M.C.M. component core: CE 570, 573, 574, 575, 577.
  • 3 credit hours of M.C.M. component elective: Choose from: CE 571, 576, 598.

See the Anderson School of Management: Master of Business Administration and the School of Engineering: Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Business Administration and Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering

The Anderson School of Management and the School of Engineering offer a Dual Degree Program leading to the degrees of the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) and the Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Engineering (M.E.M.E.). Under this program, seven courses are shared: Anderson School of Management accepts 9 credit hours of coursework from the M.E.M.E. core and 6 credit hours of engineering technical electives; the School of Engineering accepts 6 credit hours of Management coursework. Engineering Track Electives may come from either the M.E.M.E. Computer Integrated Manufacturing concentration or from the Mechanical and Equipment Manufacturing concentration.

Students pursuing this program must satisfy the admission and other academic requirements of both schools. Students are required to complete a three-month industrial internship in a manufacturing setting (or demonstrate previous equivalent experience). Students are also required to complete a 3 credit hour project in conjunction with a manufacturing enterprise. The 60 credit hour M.E.M.E./M.B.A. curriculum is:

Credit
Hours
Choose from:
CS 529, 585; ECE 536, 574L, 595; ME 581.
3
ME 585 Modern Manufacturing Methods 3
ME 586 Design for Manufacturability 3
MGMT 501
-or-
STAT 570
Data Driven Decision Making**

Industrial Statistics
3
MGMT 502 Financial Accounting and Analysis 3
MGMT 504 Managerial Economics 3
MGMT 506 Managing People in Organizations 3
MGMT 508 Business and Society 3
MGMT 511 Technology Commercialization and the Global Environment 3
MGMT 521 Manufacturing Systems Management 3
MGMT 522 Managerial Marketing 3
MGMT 526 Financial Decision Making 3
MGMT 598 The Strategic Management Process 3
Elective MOT Elective (MGMT 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, 519) 6
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective 3
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective 3
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective 3
Elective Engineering Area of Focus Elective (for Plan II) 3
CS/ECE/ME Project (or 6 credit hours Thesis, Plan I) 3
Total 60


** Students may substitute MGMT 501 if STAT 570 is not available.

See the Anderson School of Management: Master of Business Administration and the School of Engineering sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Computer Engineering or in Electrical Engineering

The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) and Master of Science (M.S.) in Computer Engineering or in Electrical Engineering Dual Degree Program aimed at electrical or computer engineering graduate students who have an interest in a career that requires graduate-level training in both business and electrical or computer engineering. This program is offered by Anderson School of Management and by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the School of Engineering.

The 3-2 M.B.A. Electrical and Computer Engineering Student

For undergraduate Electrical and Computer Engineering students pursuing the Shared-Credit Undergraduate/Graduate Degrees Program for the “3-2” M.B.A., the Dual Degree Program must be entered soon after becoming a graduate student. In addition to fulfilling the M.B.A. requirements after receiving the Bachelor’s degree from the School of Engineering, the 3-2 Electrical and Computer Engineering student must earn at least 18 credit hours in ECE courses including 9 credit hours in an area of study as described in the Plan II requirements of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student Handbook.

  • Statistics: MGMT 501 (taken as ECE **340 equivalent)
  • Accounting: MGMT 502 (taken in senior year)
  • Microeconomics: MGMT 504 (taken ECON **300 in junior year)
  • Organizational Behavior: MGMT 506 (taken in senior year)
  • Ethics: MGMT 508 (taken in senior year)
  • Technical Communication: MGMT 511 (taken in senior year)

Requirements to complete M.B.A.

  • 12 additional credit hours in core M.B.A. curriculum (MGMT 520, 522, 526, 598).
  • 12 additional credit hours in elective M.B.A. courses.
  • Maximum 6 credit hours (ECE) outside Anderson School of Management.
  • 48 total M.B.A. credit hours.

M.S. in Computer Engineering or M.S. in Electrical Engineering Student: 9 extra credit hours must be taken to obtain the M.B.A. for a total of 42 credit hours. See the Plan II requirements of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student Handbook for details:

  • 18 credit hours in ECE courses (9 credit hours in the area of focus, maximum of 6 credit hours at 400-level).
  • 15 credit hours of M.B.A. curriculum.
  • 33 credit hours total in M.S. Computer Engineering or in M.S. Electrical Engineering Plan II program.

M.B.A. student: 12 extra credit hours must be taken to obtain the M.S. in Computer Engineering or the M.S. in Electrical Engineering for a total of 42 credit hours.

The Non-3-2 M.B.A. Electrical and Computer Engineering Student

The Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate student who did not complete his/her baccalaureate program from Electrical and Computer Engineering under the 3-2 M.B.A. program is also eligible to enter the Dual Degree Program. In addition to fulfilling the M.B.A. requirements,  the non-3-2 Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate student must earn at least 18 credit hours in ECE courses including 9 credit hours in an area of study as described in the Plan II requirements of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student Handbook.

Requirements to complete M.B.A.

  • 30 credit hours in M.B.A. curriculum (MGMT 501, 502, 504, 506, 508, 511, 520, 522, 526, 598, excluding waivers).
  • 12 additional credit hours in elective M.B.A. courses.
  • Maximum 6 credit hours (ECE) outside Anderson School of Management.
  • 48 total M.B.A. credit hours.

M.S. in Computer Engineering or M.S. in Electrical Engineering Student: 27 extra credit hours must be taken to obtain the M.B.A. for a total of 60 credit hours. Waivers can be earned for ECE **340, ECON **300 and other courses taken during undergraduate/graduate programs. See the Plan II requirements of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Student Handbook.

  • 18 credit hours in ECE courses (9 credit hours in area, maximum of 6 credit hours at 400-level).
  • 15 credit hours of M.B.A. curriculum.
  • 33 credit hours total in M.S. in Computer Engineering or M.S. in Electrical Engineering Plan II program.

M.B.A. student: 12 extra credit hours must be taken to obtain the M.S. in Computer Engineering or the M.S. in Electrical Engineering for a total of 60 credit hours.

See the Anderson School of Management: Master of Business Administration and the School of Engineering: Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Community and Regional Planning and Master of Public Administration

The Master of Community and Regional Planning (M.C.R.P.) and Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) Dual Degree Program is available to students who desire a public sector career in leadership positions requiring the skills of both a trained planner and administrator. The program of studies enables students to acquire skills and background necessary to assess public needs, develop community plans and programs, and in general to become effective administrators of planning organizations in urban, regional or rural settings. Students with undergraduate degrees in any discipline may be admitted provided they meet the entrance requirements of both degree programs. Each student selects either Community and Regional Planning or Public Administration as the home unit and is assigned an advisor accordingly. Together, the advisor and student organize an individualized program of studies that incorporates the core courses in both degree programs, an internship or extra course, a special interdisciplinary seminar on the practice of policy development, and 6 to 9 credit hours of electives. At the end of the M.C.R.P./M.P.A. coursework, students elect to complete either a thesis supervised by a joint faculty committee or a public administration professional paper plus a community and regional planning independent project.

This Dual Degree Program requires a minimum of 60 credit hours of coursework, however, the number of credit hours needed to complete the program varies according to the core requirements in effect for each degree. In most instances, the M.C.R.P./M.P.A. Dual Degree Program can be completed in two-thirds the time it would normally take to earn both degrees separately.

See the School of Architecture and Planning: Community and Regional Planning Graduate Program and the School of Public Administration: Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Community and Regional Planning and Master of Water Resources

The Master of Community and Regional Planning (M.C.R.P.) and Master of Water Resources (M.W.R.) Dual Degree Program prepares students to make important contributions in both water resources and planning through a familiarity with the scientific discourse of water resources and the language and methodologies from community-based planning. Diverse groups are brought together to collaborate in the mediation of water disputes, especially in the Southwest where demands on limited water resources are increasing exponentially. Students are exposed to the pedagogy of instructors in diverse fields of expertise, such as resource planning and management, dispute resolution and negotiation, hydrology, economic development, and collaborative planning. The M.C.R.P./M.W.R. curriculum is:

Credit
Hours
CRP 500 Planning Theory and Process 4
CRP 511 Analytical Methods for Planning 3
CRP 527 Watershed Management 3
CRP 532 Foundations of Natural Resources 3
CRP 536 Visualization Tools for Plan Making 3
CRP 580 The Politics of Land 3
CRP 587 Political Economy of Urban Development in a Global World 3
CRP 588 Project Development 2
CRP 589
-or-
CRP 599
Professional Project II

Master's Thesis
6
WR 571 Water Resources I - Contemporary Issues 4
WR 572 Water Resources II - Models 4
WR 573 Water Resources III - Field Problems 4
  Subtotal 42
  M.W.R. Electives
  Hydroscience 6
  Policy and Management 3
  Water Resources Utilities 3
  Electives approved by advisor 3
  Subtotal 15
  Total 57


See the School of Architecture and Planning: Community and Regional Planning Graduate Program and the Graduate Interdisciplinary Programs: Water Resources Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


Master of Public Health and Master of Science in Nursing

The Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) and Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) Dual Degree Program prepares Nurses interested in leadership careers for professional community health nursing and public health positions. Nurses are prepared to perform the core functions of assessment, assurance, surveillance and health policy in the public health arena.

The program of studies in the two disciplines enables Nurses with baccalaureate preparation to further develop skills necessary to assess and plan healthcare delivery systems within the public health system. The detailed plan of studies satisfies the core curriculum in both areas. The Plan I (thesis) option is minimally 54 credit hours. The Plan II (non-thesis) option is minimally 56 credit hours if the designated course plans are followed. Applicants must satisfy admission and other academic requirements of each program.

See the College of Population Health: Graduate Program and the College of Nursing: Graduate Program sections of this Catalog for course and individual degree information.


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