Geography and Environmental Studies

Chris S. Duvall, Department Chair
Bandelier West, Room 220
MSC 01 1110
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
(505) 277-5041
https://geography.unm.edu/

Professors
Chris S. Duvall, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Scott M. Freundschuh, Ph.D., State University of New York, Buffalo
K. Maria D. Lane, Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin
Melinda Morgan, J.D., University of Idaho
Associate Professors
Ronda L. Brulotte, Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin
Constantine Hadjilambrinos, Ph.D., University of Delaware
Christopher D. Lippitt, Ph.D., San Diego State University/University of California, Santa Barbara
Marygold Walsh-Dilley, Ph.D., Cornell University
Assistant Professors
Miriam Gay-Antaki, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Xi Gong, Ph.D., Texas State University
Natasha Howard, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Yan Lin, Ph.D., Texas State University
Yolanda Lin, Ph.D., Cornell University
Benjamin P. Warner, Ph.D., Arizona State University
Liping Yang, Ph.D., University of Maine
Lecturer
Caitlin L. Lippitt, Ph.D.,San Diego State University/University of California, Santa Barbara
Adjunct Faculty
Boleslo Romero, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara
Cody Wiley, M.S., University of New Mexico
Su Zhang, Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Emeriti Faculty
Elinore M. Barrett, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Olen Paul Matthews, Ph.D., University of Washington; J.D., University of Idaho
Stanley A. Morain, Ph.D., University of Kansas
Jerry Williams, Ph.D., University of Oregon
Affiliated Faculty
Craig Allen, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley (US Geological Survey)
Karl Benedict, Ph.D., University of New Mexico (UNM University Libraries and Learning Studies)
Christopher Brown, Ph.D., San Diego State University/University of California, Santa Barbara (NMSU Department of Geography)
Michaela Buenemann, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma (NMSU Department of Geography)
David Correia, Ph.D., University of Kentucky (UNM American Studies)
Fred Gibbs, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison (UNM History)
Sarah Hurteau, M.S., Northern Arizona University (The Nature Conservancy)
Anne Jakle, M.S., Massey University, New Zealand (UNM Office of the Vice President for Research: EPSCoR)
Kathleen Kambic, M.Arch., M.L.A., University of Virginia (UNM School of Architecture and Planning)
Elizabeth Keller, Ph.D., Oxford University (Sandia National Laboratories)
Eric Magrane, Ph.D., University of Arizona (NMSU Department of Geography) 
Frank Norris, Ph.D., University of Idaho (National Park Service)
joni palmer, Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder (independent scholar)
Will Pockman, Ph.D., University of Utah (UNM Biology)
Caroline Scruggs, Ph.D., Stanford University (UNM School of Architecture and Planning)
Steve Sesnie, Ph.D., University of Idaho (US Fish and Wildlife Services)
Melanie A. Stansbury, Ph.D., Cornell University (Utton Center, UNM School of Law)
Asa Stone, Ph.D., Washington State University (Central New Mexico Community College)
Mark Stone, Ph.D., Washington State University (UNM Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering)
Jennifer Tucker, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley (UNM School of Architecture and Planning)
Jacqueline Waite, Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park (Energy, Minerals & Natural Resources Department, State of New Mexico)

Introduction

Geography is the study of spatial patterns of human activities and cultures, of natural environments and events, and of the methods used to identify and portray spatial patterns. The department’s programs have two main emphases. First, many courses focus on human-environment interactions, and teach the knowledge and skills needed to understand the dynamic social-cultural and biophysical processes that shape our planet. Second, many courses teach the geospatial technologies and methodologies that enable the visualization and analysis of spatial phenomena.

Geography and Environmental Studies offers Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The B.A. and B.S. degrees prepare majors for careers in environmental studies, GIScience, and geography, or for entrance into the M.S. program. The B.A. degree provides students a breadth of knowledge across multiple fields of study within geography, while the B.S. degree offers students a more in-depth focus in a specific field of study within the discipline.

The GIScience undergraduate minor is ideally suited for majors from many College of Arts and Sciences departments, as well as from other Schools at UNM. These technologies have many practical applications in the social and physical sciences, engineering, healthcare, architecture and planning, and legal professions.

The Law, Environment and Geography undergraduate minor is ideal for majors from any of the social sciences who are interested in the ways law influences and is influenced by both human and non-human environments. It is an ideal track for students who are interested in pursuing careers in law, natural resource management, criminal justice studies, urban studies, and environmental science.


Courses

GEOG 1115. Maps and GIScience. (3)



GEOG 1115L. Maps and GIScience Laboratory. (1)



GEOG 1150. Introduction to Environmental Studies. (3)



GEOG 1160. Home Planet: Land, Water and Life. (3)



GEOG 1160L. Home Planet Laboratory. (1)



GEOG 1165. People and Place. (3)



GEOG 1175. World Regional Geography. (3)



GEOG 1970. World of Beer. (3)



GEOG 1996. Topics. (1-6, no limit Δ)



GEOG 2115. Information Design in Science and Society. (3)



GEOG 217. Energy, Environment and Society. (3)



GEOG 254. Introduction to Latin American Society I: Social Sciences. (3)



GEOG 2996. Topics. (1-6, no limit Δ)



GEOG 340. Latin American Culture and Society. (3)



GEOG 350. Field Methods in Geography. (3)



GEOG 352. Global Climate Change. (3)



GEOG **360. Land Use Management. (3)



GEOG 340. Latin American Culture and Society. (3)



GEOG 364. Law, Place and Space. (3)



GEOG 365. Nature and Society. (3)



GEOG 380L. Basic Statistics for Geographers. (3)



GEOG **381L. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. (4)



GEOG 390. Qualitative Methods for Geographers. (3)



GEOG 413 / 513. Critical Cartography. (3)



GEOG 427 / 527. Introductory Programming for GIS. (3)



GEOG 428 / 528. Advanced Programming for GIS. (3)



GEOG 440 / 540. Geographies of the Body. (3)



GEOG *445. Geography of New Mexico and the Southwest. (3)



GEOG *446. Exploring Oaxaca Through Food and Craft. (3)



GEOG *450. Hazards and Disasters. (3)



GEOG 453/553. Environmental Systems Modeling. (3)



GEOG 461 / 561. Environmental Management. (3)



GEOG 462 / 562. Water Governance. (3)



GEOG 463 / 563. Public Land Management. (3)



GEOG 464 / 564. Food, Environment, and Society [Food and Natural Resources]. (3)



GEOG 466 / 566. The City. (3)



GEOG 467 / 567. Governing the Global Environment. (3)



GEOG 469 / 569. Environments and Peoples in Latin America. (3)



GEOG 470 / 570. Environmental Security: Energy. (3)



GEOG 471. Senior Geography Capstone. (1)



GEOG 472 / 572. Environmental Security: Food and Water. (3)



GEOG *481L. Map Design and Geovisualization. (4)



GEOG 483L / 583L. Remote Sensing Fundamentals. (4)



GEOG 484L / 584L. Applications of Remote Sensing. (4)



GEOG 485L / 585L. Internet Mapping. (3)



GEOG 486L / 586L. Applications of GIS. (3)



GEOG 487L / 587L. Spatial Analysis and Modeling. (3)



GEOG 488L / 588L. GIS Concepts and Techniques. (3)



GEOG 491. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ [1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ])



GEOG 493. Internship in Applied Geography. (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



GEOG *499. Topics in Geography. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



GEOG 501. Geographic History and Methods. (3)



GEOG 502. Approaches to Geographical Research. (3)



GEOG 513 / 413. Critical Cartography. (3)



GEOG 514. Natural Resources Management Seminar. (3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



GEOG 515. Seminar in Geographies of Power. (3, may be repeated once Δ)



GEOG 516. Seminar: Globalization and Development. (3)



GEOG 522. Introduction to Spatial Data Management. (3)



GEOG 524. Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing. (3)



GEOG 525. Advanced GIScience Seminar. (3)



GEOG 527 / 427. Introductory Programming for GIS. (3)



GEOG 528 / 428. Advanced Programming for GIS. (3)



GEOG 540/440. Geographies of the Body. (3)



GEOG 551. Drylands. (3)



GEOG 561 / 461. Environmental Management. (3)



GEOG 562 / 462. Water Governance. (3)



GEOG 563 / 463. Public Land Management. (3)



GEOG 564 / 464. Food, Environment, and Society [Food and Natural Resources]. (3)



GEOG 566 / 466. The City. (3)



GEOG 567 / 467. Governing the Global Environment. (3)



GEOG 569 / 469. Environments and Peoples in Latin America. (3)



GEOG 570/470. Environmental Security: Energy. (3)



GEOG 572 / 472. Environmental Security: Food and Water. (3)



GEOG 580L. Spatial Statistics. (3)



GEOG 581L. Introduction to GIS for Graduate Students. (3)



GEOG 583L / 483L. Remote Sensing Fundamentals. (4)



GEOG 584L / 484L. Applications of Remote Sensing. (4)



GEOG 585L / 485L. Internet Mapping. (3)



GEOG 586L / 486L. Applications of GIS. (3)



GEOG 587L / 487L. Spatial Analysis and Modeling. (3)



GEOG 588L / 488L. GIS Concepts and Techniques. (3)



GEOG 590. Qualitative Methods. (3)



GEOG 591. Problems. (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



GEOG 593. Internship in Applied Geography. (1-3 to a maximum of 3 Δ)



GEOG 597. Master's Project. (3)



GEOG 598. Topics in Geography. (1-3 to a maximum of 6 Δ)



GEOG 599. Master's Thesis. (1-6, no limit Δ)



GEOG 601. Introduction to Geographic Theory and Application. (3)



GEOG 602. Integrative Research Design. (3)



GEOG 603. Professional Geographic Practice. (3)



GEOG 699. Dissertation. (3-12, no limit Δ)



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Office of the Registrar

MSC11 6325
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131

Phone: (505) 277-8900
Fax: (505) 277-6809